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Full text of "Town Topics (Princeton), July 5, 2000"

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P/?S Committee Pushes 
for MinoritD Recruit- 
ment 3 

Panera Bread to Open 
125-Seat Cafe on Nassau 
Street 5 

New Jersey Breathes 
Files Petition to Par- 
ticipate in Smoking Ban 
Suit 6 

Gail F. Stem Wins State 
Museum Award 16 

Nursery School Founder 
Returns for Schools 70th 
Anniversary 26 




Princeton High Coach 
Peter Stanton Has 
Taught Team How to Win 
with Class and Lose with 
Dignity 30 

INDEX 

Art 28 

Calendar 37 

Classified Ads 44 

Clubs 15 

Consumer Bureau ... 26 

Current Cinenta 22 

Graduates 39 

Mailbox 34 

Music/Theatre 20 

New To Os 18 

Obi' , t 42 

People 41 

Real Esl.te Sales ... 43 

Sports 30 

Topiv w. 'own ... 3 
Trenton Roundup .... 8 
Weddings 17 



I 



No Action Is Taken on 
Doubling Meter Rates 
In Palmer Square Area 

Borough Council at its June 27 
meeting had been expected to 
introduce an ordinance that would 
raise the 75 cent hourly meter rate 
to $1.50 in Palmer Square and to a 
dollar in the rest of the Central Busi- 
ness District. But this never 
happened. 

After a discussion that lasted 
more than an hour-and-a-half, 
Council decided to go back to the 
drawing board and ask Borough 
Engineer Carl Peters to come up 
with a variety of possible parking 
changes, along with an estimate of 
the revenue that would be gener- 
ated by these changes. 

In addition, It would not have 
been possible that night to intro- 
duce an ordinance setting the 
higher meter rates because the 
draft ordinance was incomplete, 
and because earlier ordinances had 
not been codified, making it hard to 
prepare revisions. 

The meter rate increase in the 
Central Business Distnct had been 
offered as a way for the Borough to 
gain an additional $200,000 in reve- 
nue each year. This amount of 
money is needed to replenish sur- 
plus and avoid a tax increase 
higher than this year's 2 cent rise. 

A supporter of the meter rate 
hike, Councilman Roger Martindell 
said that in order to generate an 
additional $200,000 in revenue, the 
average Borough taxpayer would 
have to pay $70 more each year. 

Continued on Page 1 4 



50^ at all newsstands 



New Library Will Cost $17.5 



The new Princeton Public Library, 
now being designed by The Hillier 
Group, will cost a total of $17.5 mil- 
lion. That amount is almost $6 mil- 
lion more than the original $12 mil- 
lion estimate. 

"We are designing a building to 
meet the needs of the community," 
commented Library Board President 
Harry Levine, at a joint meeting with 
Borough Council and Township 
Committee members on Thursday, 
June 29. "We don't yet know exactly 
how we will pay for it." 

Architects for The Hillier Group 
presented plans for a spacious 
(54,525 square feet, plus pent- 
house), light-filled library to Town- 
ship and Borough officials last week. 
Luis Vildostegui noted that Hillier is 
designing the three-story building — 
to be located at the corner of With- 
erspoon Street and Wiggins Lane — 
from the "inside out." 

The entrance to the now library 
will be on Witherspoon Street; and 
patrons will be able to look "up in 
and up into the facility, seeing a 
backbone of books," according to 
architect Joe Rizzo. There will also 
be large bay windows facing Wig- 
gins Lane. 

The architects did not elaborate 
on exterior details, which have yet to 
be resolved, as do parking issues, 
re-location of library operations dur- 
ing construction, and — most impor- 
tant — financing. 

[In 1994, the architectural firm of 
Kieran, Timberlake & Harris, Phila- 
delphia, conducted an expansion 
feasibility study for" the library, 
financed jointly by the Township and 



the Borough, as co-owners. 

The consultants proposed con- 
struction of a two-story addition to 
the south of the library, along With- 
erspoon Street, raised on columns 
to allow for parking at ground level. 
They also recommended that the 
library's atrium area be filled in and 
that a small third story be added on 
top of the present structure. The 
cost for a total of 57,000 square feet 
was set at $12 million. 

At that time, the Township and 
Borough each agreed to supply $3 
million of the cost, with the remain- 
ing $6 million to be raised by the 
library board. These amounts were 
used, pending further study, until 
Hillier was engaged.] 



Municipal officials seemed taken 
aback at the increased construction 
cost last week, although f^r. Levine 
pointed out that, despite a change in 
library design, most of the hike can 
be attributed to inflation during the 
last six years. 

"Anything more than $12 million is 
not in the debt management plan of 
the Borough," commented Borough 
Mayor Marvin Reed. 

Mr. Levine assured municipal offi- 
cials that the library board could 
raise the additional monies, and that 
it would not ask for combined 
municipal conthbutions of more than 
$6 million. 

"Before we make a legal commit- 

Continued on Page 2 



Princeton Medical Group Physician 
H. Rothberg Retires After 40 Years 



Harvey Rothberg. 71, retired from 
active practice as an internist and 
oncologist with the Princeton Medi- 
cal Group last Friday — after 40 
years. 

Cince c !!iiMc;ing his retirement 
by letter to patients in April, Dr. 
Rothberg has been inundated with 
notes and communications from 
them. Comments range from the 
simple "You cannot retire!" to the 
more eloquent, "I have admired 
your keen scientific mind, your 
dogged determination, and, more 
importantly, your insistence to treat 



each patient as a unique individual." 
Reaction from the medical com- 
munity has been just as intense. 
"He is one of the greatest physi- 
cians I've ever had the privilege of 
working with," commented Ben 
Wright, Dr. Rothberg's partner for 
many years. 

Dr. Wright was one of nine doc- 
tors who welcomed Dr. Rothberg to 
the Princeton Medical Group when 
he joined it in 1960. [Twenty-one 
doctors are now part of the group 
practice, which has offices at the 

Continued on Page 40 




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enjoyed the Saturday night fireworks sponsored by tlie Spirit 
of Princeton from a vantage point across Lake Cameoie from 
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Princeton 

Town Topics 

(ISSN 0191-7056) 

Published Every Wednesday 

Donald C. Stuart 
1914-1981 

Dan D. Coyle 

1916-1973 

Founding Editors/Publishers 

Donald C.Stuart III 
Editor and Publisher 

Steve Alien 

Myrna Bearse 

Anne Rivera 

Assistant Editors 

Linda Sproefinle 
Advertising Manager 

Lynn Smith 

Gina Zechiel 

Advertising Representatives 

Donald Gilpin 
Nancy Plum 
Frank Rivera 
Jean Stratton 
Linda Tyler 
Contributing Editors 

Subscnplion Rates $20/yt (Princeton area), 
$22/yr (NJ. NY & PA); $25/yr (all oltter sUies); 
student sut)scriptions $18: single iss'ies $1 
mailed and 50 cents at newsstands For addi- 
tional intormatlon, please write or call: 

4 Mercer Street 

Princeton, NJ 08540 

609-924-2200 

Periodicals Postage Paid at Princeton, NJ Post- 
master Send aJdress changes to Town Topics 
PC. Bo» 664 Princeton, NJ 03542 



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Library 

Continued from Page 1 

ment, we must make sure 
library fundraislng will be suc- 
cessful," Borough Council- 
man David Goldfarb Insisted. 

Project Will Fly 

Mr. Levine said he was con- 
fident the 'project will fly." 
He said the library board has 
already made a substantial 
six-figure contribution to 
fundraising. 

Borough Council member 
Roger Martindell pointed out 
that a number of community 
organizations are involved in 
major fundraising campaigns, 
Including the Arts Council 
and McCartcr Theatre. "One 
could argue that there is a 
limited private pool of funds," 
he said. "Is a $17 million 
library something the commu- 
nity can afford?" 

"If the community's needs 
exceed public ability to pay. 
private funding may not be 
capable of supporting every- 
thing," Mr. Levine conceded. 
"There are other funding 
sources, such as the state. I 
am confident," he continued, 
"that the community places a 
high priority on a library of 
this dimension. If our advisers 
had been worried, they would 
have told us we would be in 
■ trouble." 

"The ultimate success of 
fundraising centers on the 
level of commitment of the 
governing bodies," com- 
mented Mayor Reed. "We're 
going to need authorization 
for more than $17 million in 
construction funds." 

No construction contracts 
can be let without municipal 
authorization to spend the 
entire $17 million, according 
to municipal officials. "The 
two municipalities will have 
to work with fundraisers," 
Township Administrator 
James Pascale pointed out. 

To get the project started, 
each municipality will have to 
pass a bond ordinance for its 
share of the total construction 
cost. Contributions that come 



Enchanted Summer Gardens . . . 




in through fundraising will be 
deducted from the total 
amount. Because the bills will 
not all come in at once, short- 
term bonds can be approved 
as the work progresses. 

"It is very unlikely that we 
would have to go to the bond 
market for the full amount," 
Township Financial Officer 
John Clawson told TOWN 
TOPICS. "As we go along, 
we will know the extent to 
which we must float bonds." 

16-Month Project 

The architects have esti- 
mated that construction will 
take about 16 months, and 
have projected a start date of 
March 2001. 

During those 16 months, of 
course, library operations will 
have to be located off-site. 
The possibility of relocating to 
the Valley Road Building, 
which is owned by the PrirKe- 
ton Regional Schools, is being 
discussed. 

Township municipal offices 
are now located in the build- 
ing, along with the school dis- 
trict's administrative offices. 
Once the Township vacates 
its 24.000 square feet, how- 
ever — anticipated for early 
next year — the library could 
move into the space 
temporarily. 

There are, however, no 
sprinklers in the Valley Road 
Building. If the library is 
required to install sprinklers, 
that will add $200,000 to the 
cost of the project. 

Parking at Valley Road is 
also limited. Provided the 
school district and the Town- 
ship can find an alternate 
space for the 15 school buses 
that now park behind the Val- 
ley Road Building, relocation 
would be feasible, Mr. Levine 
said. 

The issue of downtown 
library parking will be dis- 
cussed in detail at another 
joint meeting between the two 
municipalities and the library 
board, Mr. Levine said. At 
that meeting, scheduled for 
7:30, on July 31, in Borough 
Hall, other unresolved issues 
will also be clarified, he 
promised. 

—Anne Rivera 




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OPEN MOUTH WONDER: Aaron, Josh, Rebecca and Page Berger are in awe at 
the Spirit of Princeton fireworks display held on the Princeton University 
fields on Washington Road. ^ ,c^p^J„ 

Education Committee Urges Increase 
In Minority Staff; Focus on Early Ed 

■• - embers of the Prince- express in person, the impor- to read, we would then have 
ton Kegional Schools tance of recruiting minor- no one but the SWAT team to 



Beautiiul, Custom 

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Our 50th Year! 



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minority education Ities," he said 

nTn!l? ^^'' 'TH w^«° Th« recommendation was 
pu pressure on d.stnct offi- one of several goals enunci- 
cials to recruit teachers who «="uih.i 

are members of minority 
groups. At a meeting of the 
committee on June 21. board 
member Myra Williams sug- 
gested that a goal of 25 per 



TOPICS 

Of the Town 



St 

liewuci 



blame 

"We say our commimity is 

different, ' he continued. 

"Let's do something different. 

There's no reason we can't 

attack this issue head on." 

Dr. Graber suggested that 
committee members take the 

■I, JZ I possible ,o o Sri„°' .hr^com" J^jlS/' P<"t-,™c„, to 
work wllh Ih. director o( per- year. ' codd serve the distnct as a 

sonnel to target black colleoes T».» ™ i jii u . guideline. 

With high !^ality educaUon to^" t^r^^l ^ 'T"'*^ ^''^^^ ^ittman. a fom,er 
programs." she insisted. Its ^ext^Ptini J"'"^^" f ^^^''^ '"«"'b«^- "'^ he 

Other members of the Comm tTee ' c\a r ° wl r ^Mft " *°"'? ^'" t '^^"^ 
group pointed out that not Frank. "I think the recoil ^"' '' '^ committee submitted 
only teachers, but also admin- mendation oif^ ^rcent wTs of^T^n ""T, ° '^a ^"^ 
istrators, should be members a way of putting ZS^^Z- t^TT^^^'^t^ Z 

Assistant Superintendent goal, he added. Myra s involved in orchestra and cho- 
Jettrey Graber said that once statement was an expression ^js activities, as well as 
a human resources director is of a minority education com- dramatic performances 
hired, that person could meet niittee concern that has been 
with the committee. "You can going on for years. 

I think it was well received 
"•because it is so specific," Mr. 
Frank continued. "We have 
been without a personnel 
director for some time; and it 
has been hard to make much 




in 



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progress in terms of minority 
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The PRS district also needs 
to develop strong policies on 
intolerance, suggested Caro- 
line Mitchell, a committee co- 
chair. She said that policies 
on intolerance are just as 
important — and can be as 
effective — as policies on sex- 
ual harassment. 

Mr. Frank, who invited 
committee members to talk 
about their objectives, said he 
was struck by committee 
members' emphasis upon the 
importance of pre-kindergar- 
ten and early childhood 
[ education. 

Several members stressed 
, the importance of teaching 
children to read at an early 
age. Former board member 
Ricardo Bruce, in (>articular, 
urged that the district attack 
[discrepancies in the kinds of 
pre-kindergarten and kinder- 
garten education available to 
various groups of Princeton 
children. 



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"We should have a kind of 
SWAT team staff for eariy 
education," he said. "Invest 
money in the front end of 
education," he urged. "Then 
we won't have so many meet- 
ings like this. If a chikl got to 
fim iiEiKk JMitbout. b«ii«.abl» 



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for that quality. Bring us your estate jewelry, family heirkx>ms, 
even that clutter in the back of your jewelry box, and we'll 
offer you the best price in the area for your bit of the past. Stop 
in or give us a call. 

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104 Nassau Street, Piinceton, NJ • 609-924- 1 363 



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T Dinner On July 13 
|Wil] Kick Off 

^ Race for the Cure 

i Bristol-Myers Squibb Com- 
-» pany will sponsor a dinner, 
> "Celebration of Life," to 
Q honor breast cancer survivors 
lu and The Susan G. Komen 
a Breast Cancer Foundation 
^ New Jersey on Thursday, July 

. 13 from to 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 
"2 at the company headquarters 

. on Route 206. 

o Pre-reglstration is neces- 
uj sary. Space is limited. For 
5 reservations, call Jeanine 
g Miller at 252-2003 by June 
^ 30. There is free admission 
o for survivors. Guests pay $15 
^ each. 





S The 2000 Komen New Jer- 
g sey Race for the Cure will 

take place Sunday, October 

29 at Bristol-Myers Squibb. 

Everyone is welcome to par- _ 

a^ wScomi ''**'"'*' '''""'"' ^"' ^"^^ ^^^*-^ ®®0D: Max Shane, massage therapist, provided relaxing 

tjitome. massage to Princeton Human Resource Director Cynthia IMendez while Town- 

9.;9 o Jb °"' '^*" •'*''* "*■''**' f^¥M* Marchand waited her turn during the Senior Health Festi- 

^^^"-^""^ val held June 27th at the Princeton Shopping Center. iaw,fsPn^^o, 



50-70 



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A student In West Windsor, 
10-year-old Kyle White, has 
been the largest fund-raiser of 
anyone under the age of 17 
for the Komen New Jersey 
Race for the Cure. Kyle 
raised $1,000 in 1997 and 
again in 1998. In 1999 he 
collected more than $500, 
and is working to bring in 
more than $1000 for this 
year's race. 



Now Kyle has been recog- 
nized as a "Millennium 
Dreamer" for an essay he 



wrote about his volunteer 
efforts for the Race. Con- 
ducted by UNESCO, in asso- 
ciation with the Walt Disney 
Company and McDonald's, 
the Millennium Dreamers pro- 
gram recognizes young peo- 
ple throughout the worid who 
have made outstanding con- 
tributions in their community. 
Kyle traveled with his moth- 
er. Jane, to a special recogni- 
tion event at Walt Disney 
Worid Resort in May to honor 
the 2,000 winners from 100 
countries. 



Peace Voter 2000 Campaign 
Volunteer Training to Be July 12 

The CoaMtton for Peace Action will hoM a tralnlnQ for 
volunteers In the "Peace Voter 2000" issue advocacy cam- 
paign from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. on Wednesday, July 12, at 
the Unitarian UnlverBaHst Congregation of PHnc^on, 50 
Cheny Hill Road. 

The Training will give an overview of the Peace Voter 
fall campaign, and will offer training in Mk volunteers 
wiU use In implementing It. A light supper will be served 
and advance reservatk»is are requested. 

TJw training is open to members of the public who wish 
to advocate issues of peace and gun violence prcvcntton in 
the fall elections. 

To reserve a spot, caD the Coalition office, 924-5022. 








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Plans Move Ahead 
For Bakery/Cafe 
On Nassau Street 

Panera Bread has success- 
fully jumped what was proba- 
bly its highest hurdle when it 
was granted two variances by 
the Borough Zoning Board in 
late June. With these in hand, 
the cafe and baketv chain is 
looking hopefully at a Novem- 
ber 1 opening in the Nassau 
Street stores that formerly 
housed Verdge Technologies 
Diner and Great Impressions. 
The two storefronts will be 
combined into one 4,600 
square-foot bakery/cafe. 

The first variance gave Pan- 
era the right to use 700 feet 
in the rear of the street level 
as a portion of its headquar- 
ters. Borough zoning in most 
instances mandates that 
street-level retail or restau- 
rant use not be given up to 
offices, banks and other simi- 
lar uses. The second, a park- 
ing variance, requires that 
five off-site parking spaces be 
provided. 



walls in the interior are 
expected to remain. The bal- 
ance of the Fenwick offict 
will be housed in the 
basement. 

Panera will have a 125-seat 
dining area, including tables, 
chairs, couches, and arm- 
chairs. There will be a meet- 
ing room which, except at 
lunch, will be available for 
groups to use. 



Mr. Nawn said the Nassau 
Street Panera will open at 
6:30 a.m. seven days a week. 
The earliest it will close will 
be 8 p.m. on Sundays, and it 
will be open as late as war- 
ranted, up to 10 or 11 p.m.. 
in the latter part of the week. 



One of the spaces will be in 
the driveway of the Hodge 
Road home of Jim Nawn, an 
executive of The Fenwick 
Group. This group is a New 
Jersey franchise of Panera, 
Inc. and was formed to 
develop and manage the fran- 
chise rights of an anticipated 
40 Panera Bread bakery/ 
cafes in New Jersey. So far, 
four have opened, in West 
Orange, Paramus, Westfield, 
and Wayne. The company is 
in the final stages of lease 
negotiations for a site in West 
Windsor's Nassau Park, next 
to Target. 

Mr. Nawn anticipates that 
the Borough's Historic Pres- 
ervation Review Committee 
will review his plans on July 
12. He said he expects the 
plans will satisfy the concerns 
of the group "and with their 
stamp of approval we can 
move ahead to the building/ 
permitting stage." 

Combining Storefronts 

The storefronts of Verdge 
and Great Impressions, now 
startlingly dissimilar, will be 
merged into one, in a design 
that will be consistent with 
the Victorian nature of the 
building. This will include 
raised wood panels and 
extensive glass. The brick 



An on-site bakery will offer 
a variety of breads, including 
sourdough, rye, pumpernick- 
el, French, and focaccia, as 
well as croissants, Danish, 
and other pastries. 

The menu includes soup, 
salads, sandwiches, coffees, 
and specialty drinks, with 
most salads and sandwiches 
costing about $5. 

Through Operation Dough- 
Nation, Panera donates its 
leftovers to charity every day; 
matches donations from cus- 
tomers made at the cafe to a 
local charity; and enables 
fund-raising groups to sell 
special coupons for its prod- 
ucts and keep half the 
proceeds. 



Panera will bring together 
what had earlier been torn 
asunder. For years, Allen's, a 
children's store, was located 
at 134-136 Nassau Street. In 
the early '90s, a portion of 
the street level space was 
leased to Great Impressions. 
In 1996, the Allen's store 
premises were leased to 
Totally Wired, a cybercafc. In 

1997, Totally Wired assigned 
its lease to Verdge Technolo- 
gies Diner, another restau- 
rant. This closed in early 

1998. Since then, the Verdge 
space has been empty. Great 
Impressions only recently 
closed. 

Panera Bread has approxi- 
mately 170 cafes in the 
United States, primarily in the 
Midwest and Southeast. 

— Myma K. Bearse 



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Anti-smoking Group Seeks 
involvement in Litigation 

New Jersey Breathes, a coalition of some 40 anti- 
smoking organizations, filed a nnotion in state Superior 
Court on June 28 seeking to participate as an amicus 
curiae (friend of the court) on behalf of the Princeton 
Regional Health Conunission in defense of a legal chal- 
lenge to the conunission's ban on smoking. 

The ban is being challenged by the National Smokers 
Alliance and three Princeton restaurants, The Annex, 
Lahiere's, and The Ivy Inn. The Health Commission on 
June 23 filed a motion to have the National Smokers 
Alliance removed from the lawsuit, a motion whteh was 
countered last week in a plaintiffs' brief defending partici- 
pation of the Alliance. 

The Health Commisskin has agreed to place the smok- 
ing ban on hoW until there is a Judicial ruling. A July 20 
hearing is set with Superior Court Judge Linda Feinberg, 
but she is not expected to rule at diat time on the plain- 
tiffs' request for permanent Injuncthre relief. 

Attorney Robert J. Conroy, representing New Jersey 
Breathes, said the coalition wants to bring to the court's 
attention some things that might not otherwise come 
before it. Although New Jersey Breathes had earlier 
pledged financial support to the Health Commission if the 
ban were challenged, participating as an amicus curiae 
docs not appear to be considered provkiing financial 
support. 

New Jersey Breathes includes such groups as the Medi- 
cal Society of New Jersey, The American Lung Associa- 
tion, the American Cancer Society, and the American 
Heart Association. It has been involved in the movement 
to ban cigarette vending machines and efforts to limit 
second-hand smoke. 

Mr. Conroy said Judge Feinberg will decide on or before 
July 7 whether New Jersey Breathes will be allowed in as 
an amicus curiae. 

On June 1, the Princeton Regional Health Commission 
unanimously approved an ordinance prohibiting smoking 
in all enclosed public places: all restaurants, bars, caba- 
rets, and taverns; and all workplaces. Exceptions were 
made only for private homes, retail tobacco stores, and 
rooms in lodgings that were equipped with separate venti- 
lation systems. The lawsuit challenging the ordinance was 
filed one week later. — Nyrna K. Bearsc 



Professor Earns 
Failing Grade 
For Bad Behavior 

A professor at the Univer- 
sity of Tennessee was 
arrested and charged with 
DWI on July 2 at 1:56 a.m., 
after initally being stopped 
for making an illegal "U-tum " 
on Nassau Street. Robert H. 
Coleman III, 47, was taken to 
police headquarters for pro- 
cessing, and later posted 
$250 bail. He was released 
on his own recognizance, and 
is scheduled to appear in 
court on 7/24. 

A Raleigh, men's 10-speed 
white bicycle was stolen from 
outside of the Princeton Pub- 
lic Library, Witherspoon 
Street, between 6:45 and 
7:15 p.m. July 29. According 
to police, the bike was not 
locked. Its value is $200. 

Car Accident 

Township police responded 
to an automobile accident on 
State Road at 7:35 a.m. June 
29. According to police, a 
1987 Ford van, driven by 



Xillu Huang, 40, of Michigan, 
was traveling south on Route 
206 when it attempted to 
stop behind a 1998 Saturn 
SL2, driven by Delores A. 
Walter, 54, of Belle Mead. 

Huang was unable to stop 
his vehicle in time, and it 
crashed into the rear of 
Walter's car. The impact 
caused Walter's car to crash 
into the back of another vehi- 
cle, which according to 
police, left the scene. 

Witnesses told (lolice that 
the third vehicle involved was 
a gray 18-wheel tractor trail- 
er. One witness copied down 
the vehicle's license plate 
number, and after investiga- 
tion, police discovered it was 
a 1998 VMO registered to 
Sussex Transport, Inc. in Clif- 
ton. Attempts to contact the 
owner were unsuccessful. 

Huang was issued a sum- 
mons for careless driving. 
Walter was transported to the 
Medical Center of Princeton, 
complaining of facial pain. 
Police said that the driver of 
the third vehicle may not 
have felt the impact of 
Walter's car. 



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Diving Accident Sends 
Girl to Trauma Center 

A 13-year-old female 
Princeton Township resident 
was practicing dives with the 
Princeton Dive Team at the 
Community Park Pool on 
June 23, when she dove off 
the one-meter board and 
struck her head. She swam to 
the edge of the pool and was 
treated by lifeguards for a 
head laceration. 

She was unresponsive but 
breathing when the Princeton 
Pirst Aid Squad arrived on 
the scene, along with Mercer 
County paramedics. She was 
transported to Robert Wood 
Johnson Trauma Center in 
New Brunswick, where she 
was treated and released. 



MCCC Students 
Seek Nearby Housing 

Students at Mercer 
County Community Col- 
lege are looking for hous- 
ing near both its campuses 
— downtown Trenton at 
Nortf) Broad and Academy 
Streets, and West Windsor 
at 1200 Old Trenton 
Road. 

The college will serve as 
a listing agent for residents 
wishing to rent a room or 
apartment to a student. 

Financial and other 
arrangements are made 
between the home owner 
and the student. Call 586- 
4800, ext. 3435 for 
information. 



CLASSIC HAIR 

^^ 921-7047^^==" 

Full Service Hair Salon 
Manicure & Waxing 

open Monday - Saturday 

830 STATE ROAD 
PRINCETON, NJ 08540 



Wll OGOOSE 



(M^j/^s^ $f}W& ^msd^m 




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Garfield and Marks 
Misook 
Victor Costa 
Munchkins too! 
and much more... 




CMl-iilfflllli 

30%-50% off ALL SPRING MERCHANDISE! 

Mon.-Sat.10-6. Thurs.'lil 9, Sun. 12-4 • 6 Moore St. Princeton, NJ 08540 . 609.921.0338 



Our Great Summer Sale 
Save 30-507o 

SIDEWALK SALE Begins July 1 
Malleo & Co. 



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7 9 Hulfhh Street • Princeton ■ 6n9AM).U0() 
Open Daily 10-6, Tliursdiu/ & Fridny 10-9, Siniilni/ 12-5 



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BOOKS 
MUSIC 



imaginative toys for kids of all ages.' 

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609-924-TOYS 



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Paul M. Browne 

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Photos & References 
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BRICK 
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Walls Steps Patios Walkways Ponds 
Rock Gardens Tree & Shrub Installation 



Arts Council Cafe bnprov 
Wins National Award 

Cafe bnprov, the monthly 
cabaret at the Arts Council, 
has been awarded a prize in 
the National Hometown 
Video Festival. This prize is 
public access television's 
counterpart to the Emmy 
Award. 

Cafe Improv, a long- 
running music and poetry 
venue (simulcast on Prince- 
ton's public access cable TV 
station), came in first place in 
the "Performing Arts" 
category. 

The winning segment was 
part of the July 1999 Cafe 
Improv, featuring singer/ 
songwriter/surrealist painter 
Dan Zimmerman. In awarding 
the prize, the judges made 
particular mention of the pro- 
fessional quality of the perfor- 
mance and the artistic vision 
that pervades the broadcasts 
of Cafe Improv. 

For information about Cafe 
Improv, call Thomas Florck, 
734-5334 or tflorek@ets.org; 
or Anne Reeves, 924-8777. 



f^' 'me .%^ *^ 

Leon of Leon's Studio 

Complete Hair Care for Men & Women 

We Have Moved To 
863 Route 206, Princeton 

k(rear entrance) i 



SCHWARTZ 
SLIPCOVER WORKSHOP 



SLIPCOVERS • REUPHOLSTERY • BEDDING 
WINDOW TREATMENTS • PILLOWS AND MORE 



"Keepers of the Earth" 
For School Age Children 

The Stony Brook-Millstone 
Watershed Association, 
located on Titus Mill Road In 
Hopewell Township, is offer- 
ing "Keepers of the Earth" 
for school children, ages 6 to 
12, on Thursday, July 6, 
from 9:30 a.m.to noon. 

Children will experierKe the 
lifestyles of Native Americans 
by looking for different wild 
foods, playing games, paint- 
ing faces and listening to 
stories. 

Children may join one or all 



Free Legal C<Hi$iiltati<N! 
To Be Joly 12 at Nail 

Local attorneys will oHer 
individuals an opportunity 
to have a free 15 nUnute 
consuhation on Wednei»- 
day, July 12, in the centei 
court of the Quaker Bridge 
Mall, Route 1, Law- 
rencevUle. The focus this 
month will be in the fol- 
lowing areas of law: Family 
Law, Real Estate, 
LarKllord/Tenant, Personal 
Injiuy, Wills and Estates 
and Workplace Problems. 
Attorneys will be available 
between the hours of 5:30 
and 7. 

Sponsored by the Publk: 
Education Committee of 
the Mercer County Bar 
Association, Lawyers 
C.A.R.E. is the only free 
clinic of its kind in Mercer 
County. Lawyers C.A.R.E. 
is dedicated to counseling, 
providing assistance, iden- 
tifying resources and edu- 
cating the general public 
about their legal rights. 
Everyone is seen on a first 
come, first served basis. 
Free Brochures on a vari- 
ety of topics will also be 
available. 

For more information 
call the Mercer County Bar 
Associatton at 585-6200. 

of the nine sessions in this 
series. Pre-registration is 
required by July 6 and enroll- 
ment is limited. The fee is $7 
for Watershed members and 
$10 for non-members. For 
more information, call the 
Buttinger Nature Center at 
737-7592. 



Family & Children's Services 
of Central New Jersey 

The Counseling Center for 
Personal and Family Relationships 

• Personal Psychotherapy • 

• Maritaj/Couple Therapy • 
• Substance Abuse Therapy • 

• Family Therapy • Group Therapy • 

Most major inediLal insurance, managed tan., Medicaid and 

Medicare accepted. Sliding tec scale available. 

,1-800-479-3779 



Princeton 
609-924-2098 



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908-572-0.3(K) 



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WEDDINGS • SWEET 1 5 & 1 6 PARTIES 

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TRENTON ROUNDUP 



Deer Control Legislation 

Governor Christine Whitman signed dcer-nfuinagement legislation on Friday, June 30, 
opening the way for the Township to conduct a controlled hunt. 

The legislation permits municipalities, airport owners, and agriculture boards statewide 
to waive normal hunting regulations in areas where the deer population Is out of control — 
as long as the state Division of Fish and Wildlife grants permission. 

The Township, and especially Mayor Marchand. has been in the forefront of lobbying 
efforts for the legislation. The Township can only sustain about 300 deer overall — or 20 
per square mile — without damage to th^ ecology. In recent years, the size of the herd has 
increased to a total of more than 1 ,300, wreaking havoc with local vegetation and posing 
an extreme hazard to motorists. 

Opponents of the legislation, including the Mercer County Deer Alliance, argue that, 
rather than reducing the total deer herd, a hunt would cause it to replerush at a more rapid 
rate. They argue that other options ate available. These include rounding up the deer and 
transporting them out of state, or employing immunocontraceptive techniques. 

At press time, it was unclear what option the Township will choose. 

Sprinklers Required 

Last week, the Assembly unanimously approved legislation that would require all New 
Jersey colleges and universities to install sprinkler systems in every dormitory room. 
Governor Whitman has said she will sign the bill on July 5. h passed the state Senate on 
June 26. 

The bill applies to colleges, universities, boarding schools, military schools, fraternity 
houses, and sorority houses, and creates a $90 million loan program for the state to help 
pay for the sprinklers. There is a four-year limit for installing the sprinklers. 

Health Coverage 

The state Senate last week approved a bill to bring health insurance coverage to 
125,000 low-income and working families. The bill, S-1467, passed by a 39-0 vote and 
now goes to Governor Whitman for her signature. It wouki provkle subsidized healA 
insurance for working New Jersey residents. 

Over-time Nursing 

A growing shortage of nurses is causing problems for New Jersey hospitals, especially In 
specialties like critkal care. In order to keep units property staffed, some hospitals have 
bieen forcing nurses to work mandatory over-time. 

Legislation passed last week would prohibit forced overtime in New Jersey hospitals and 
nursing homes, except in emergencies. If Governor Whitman signs the bill, as expected, 
New Jersey would be the first state in the ruition to prohibit mandatory over-time. 

Carol Chemack, a spokeswoman for the State Nurses Association, explained that the 
nursir>g shortage, which she termed "almost a crisis situation," could also pose safety risks 
for patients if over-time is used as a solution. 

"An exhausted nurse working the 15th hour of a double shift involuntarily is not who 
you want taking care of you," she pointed out. 





FOURFOf^ 

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Exercise your 

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Fine Fubnituke • Intekiok Design & Decoratin( 

162 Nassau Street 924.2561 • 

Where Princeton gets its good looks. 



PERNA'S 

Plant & Flower Shop 

452-1383 

189 Washington Rd. 



PRJNCETON HEALTH FOOD 

1225 Route 206 (& 518) 

(Next to Grand Union) 

M-F 10-6:30; Sat 10-5 

609-279-1636 



Classic combination, 
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Hamilton iniroducti ihe Harkquin Collection in I8K gold and 

sterling silver. Available in two sizes. Necklace: medium SI, 59S, petite SI,I9S 

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HAMILTON . 

FAMILY-OWNED ?EWELERS SINCE H12 

1-S00-5-HAMILTON www.hamiltonjewelers.com 

Princeton, 92 Nassau St. (609) 683-4200 Lawrenceville, Alt. Rte. 1 (609) 771-9400 

PRINCETON LAWRENCEVllLE PALM BEACH PAIM BEACH GARDENS 



Httlit's Women's 
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m progress 

25'50% OFF 

A Large Selection of Styles by 

Seiby • Dexter • Bom • Steve Madden 

Zante • BeautiFeel • Clarks • & many more! 

Hulit's Shoes 

142 Nassau Street • Princeton • 924-1952 

Regular Hours: Mon.. Tues.. Wed. 9:30-6; Thurs. 9:30-7 p.m ; Fri. 9-6; Sat. 9:30-5; Sun 12-4 



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SPOTTED 



SIGMUND AWARD: Broadcast journalist, author, and political commentator 
Cokie Roberts, who spoke at the Douglass College convocation last month in 
New Brunswick, flanked by Douglass graduates Angela J. Clinton, left, and 
Stacey D. Schesser, who shared the Barbara Boggs Sigmund Award given by 
the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers. The award is named 
for Ms. Roberts' late sister, mayor of Princeton Borough, and one of the 
state's best-known political women until her death in 1990. 






PERENNIALS 



A Gardener'* Paradit* 
ctl. 1939 

erson's 

Garden Center 
Nursery ■ Green Houses • Landscaping 





Tea With Batterflies 
At Stony Brook'^fillstone 

The Stony Brook-Millstone 
Watershed Association, 
located on Titus Mill Road in 
Pennington, is offering "Tea 
with the Fritjllaries" for chil- 
dren ages 5 to 9 and parents, 
on Saturday, July 8 from 
1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. 

Children will enjoy a 
charKe to dress up in their 



5arbana L. Rus50 

CPP, CDP 

Divorce Mediation 
Divorce Planning 



Financial Plannine 
609-921-3017 



summer finery and take tea 
with the butterflies. The party 
will take place in the Kate 
Gorrie Butterfly House and 
will feature snacks, crafts, 
games, and tea. 

Pre-registration is required 
by July 8 and enrollment is 
limited. The fee is $5 for 
Watershed members and $8 
for non-memi>ers. For more 
information or to register call 
the Buttinger Nature Center 
at 737-7592. 



explained, it will take just a 
twist heer and there to allow 
every child to create dogs, 
flowers, rabbits, and more. 
For more information, and 
to register, call the library, at 
924-7073. 



^^ Shop at Peterson's for the finest qualitif money can buyl ^^ 

\^J^ 3730 Rt. 206 bctw. Princeton & Lawrenceville • 609-924-5770 ^t^J 
^\\h Hours: Daily 9-6; Sunday 9-5 ^M^ 




J' 




Balloon Workshop Set 
At the Rocky Hill Ubraiv 

The Mary Jacobs Library, 
64 Washington Street, Rocky 
Hill, will present a Balloon 
Workshop on Tuesday, July 
11, at 10:30. The program, 
conducted by entertainer Joe 
f^scher is designed for chil- 
dren, ages 7 and older. 

The event will offer the 
audience a chance to develop 
the skill to create a real bal- 
loon "sculpture." Once a few 
well-guarded secrets are 






0. 



Mazur Nursery 

and Flower Shop 

"Growers of Qualitv Plants" 

Blooming Annuals 
and Perennials 

265 Baker's Basin Rd«L'viUe*587-9150 



Georgie Skover, CKD 

&LS Design 

Kitchen Planning A Design 



609.497.0935 609.497.1161 Fax 
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47 State Rd. (Rt. 206) » PRINCETON - 609-497-0030 



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The best k0pt secret for 

ORIENTAL RUGS 

bought • sold • cleaned 
restored • appraised 

Roland Boehm, Jr. 
2^.«r« 10 Church St.. Lambertvllle 
"*^^^ Wed-Frl 12-5; Sat & Sun 11 -5.30 
or by gpp't. 609-397-0044 




Why Is Brandon 
Attracting National Attention? 

Simple... 



Princeton 80,000 sq. ft. 
W. Palm Beach 50,000 sq. ft. 
Denver 40,000 sq. ft. 
Hollywood 35,000 sq. ft. 
Chicago 25,000 sq. ft. 
Rockville 15,000 sq.ft. 
Brooklyn 15,000 sq.ft. 
Westchester 20,000 sq. ft. 
St. Louis 20,000 sq. ft. 
Potomac Mills 43,000 sq, ft. 
Westbury 20,000 sq. ft. 
and more! 






Our International buying power allows us to offer 
the highest quality furnishings at 

America's lowest prices! 



Call your nearest Brandon 
for further Information 



In Lawrenceville Call 

609-406-9100 




Open 
Sunday 9-4 

Tues. thm Sat. by app't 



4 UTHO ROAD • LAWRENCEVILLE, MJ 

At Rt 1. Behind Mercedes of Princeton & Lawrence Unco.n Mercury * 1/2 Mile South of 295/95 at Rt. 1 







I 




DOLLS FOR APPALACHIA: Stuart Country Day 
School student Avery Epstein, left, a Princeton res> 
ident, with Stuart Lower School Head Patty Schorr, 
and dolls collected for children in Appalachia. 
When Avery served as acting head of the Lower 
School recently, she chose the day's lunch menu, 
declared a no-homework day and authorized stu* 
dents to wear pajamas instead of uniforms. She 
also asked each girl to make a doll for less fortu- 
nate children. The dolls were delivered last month 
to Appalachia, by 16 upper school students, who 
went to Tennessee for a home-repair project. 

Habitat for Humanity Schedules 
Breakfast; Seeks More Volunteers 

Habitat for Humanity - Princeton Project invites current 
and prospective vohinteere to an orgarUzational breai<fast 
meeting, Saturday, July 15, at 9 a.m. at the Arts Council 
of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street. Over bagels and 
Juice, volunteers will discuss the work plan for Prtnceton 
Habitat's current project at 52 Leigh Avenue. 

Fc^k)wing breakfast, volunteers who would like to work 
for a couple of hours are invited to the Leigh Avenue 
project site to participate in demolition-related activities. 

In 1996 Habitat for Hunwnlty - Princeton Project 
embarked upon its first project at Lytle Street in the Bor- 
ough and now Is looking forward to the successful comple- 
tion of the Leigh Avenue duplex renovatton in the Town- 
ship. Habitat houses are bidh with volunteer labor, plus 
materials and cash donations from private indivkluals, 
churches, corporations, and foundations. 

To volunteer or to obtain more information, call, leave a 
message and someone will return your call within 24 
hours: 252-9292. Cash donations may be sent directly to 
Habitat for Humanity - Princeton Project, 20 Nassau 
Street. Princeton, 



RAl.PH LAI RES 



ELLEN TRACY • ES(A1).A 




Princeton 

CONSIGNMENT 

Boutique 

Where the quality of our clothing is matched 
only by the quality of our customer service! 

1378 VilLige Sh.ippcr, Kl I'M North i3 miles N of l'nm«on ' 
M'inI)(omery Tuwn«hip, N.J • SW924 22K8 • Mon-Sal 10*, Thurs 10-8, Open Sundays 15 



now A KARAS • LOUIS FERAVD • MOSDl 




Joanne Dailey, LCSW 

1 66 Bunn Dnve • Suite 1 1 • Princeton • New Jersey 08540 

609-683-0002 



Therapy for Women 

Self-Confidence Concerns 

Relationship Issues 

Depression 

Anxiety 



Als. Oail^, a Pnncelon ps/chotherapist 
^ for over 1 5 years, has helped many women 
\NOik through life obstacles and then move 
tov/ard autonomy and wholeness. 
She offers iroditKinal psychotherapy 
andjin Shinjyutsu. 




Bryn Mawr Book Shop 

Bargains in Quality Used Books 

102 Witherspoon Street • 609-921 -7479 
Summer Hours: Sat 12-4; Sun 1:30-3:30 



"Sy ^\ln'iil)riliniini liiit. Cavil Eiioii}{li 
^_^^^^ 45-B STATE ROAD 

PrinL^SoTiB- route 206 

PRINCETON, NJ 
TEL 609-924-9886 - 






s4 ^Ylxiiu/uil, '^Yleuie/v ^044/! 



Microdermahrasion, Chemical peels, and Laser 
Resurfacing can nuikc your skin look and fed younga 
and /u-riithit'T. By remoiing t/w outer layers of dt:ad skin, 
you can achiexe a nhrant complexion, mmimue wrinkks, 
and soften age sfyots and pigment irreijuluritie.s. Sc/ieJ- 
uL' a consultation uith Dr. Bninner to discuss the ideal 
slcin treatment for your particular skin care needs. 

/n Office .Siinikdl Siiite' .Avdi/d/'le 



Eugenie Bruiuier, MD, PA 



609-921-9497 

wuu'.bnoiJU'nnJ.eom 

WooJIuiiJs Professional Building, 

256 Bunn I)riie, Suite 4. Prineetrm 



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SCOUT CLEANUP: Princeton Girl Scout Troop 987 members, from left, Caro- 
line Black, Emma Heinlen, and Nicole Gabauer recently helped clean up 
Princeton Turning Basin Park, as one of their ongoing community service 
projects. Troop members scrubbed picnic tables, collected litter, and swept 
the park shelter floor. 



EST. 1891 



KOPP'S CYCLE 

...where quality 
comes first! 

38 Spring Street 
Princeton, NJ 

924-1052 



Novelist John Altman 
To Sign Books at Micawber 

John Altman, author of A 
Gathering of Spies, a World 
War II espionage thriller, 
recently published by Put- 
nam, wUl sign copies of the 
book on Sunday, July 9, at 3, 
at Micawber Books. 114 
Nassau Street. 

Mr. Altman grew up in 
Princeton, where his parents 
still live. In 1986, he 



attended the Governor's 
School, for creative writing; 
and in 1988, he entered 
Harvard College, where he 
designed his own major, "De- 
velopment and Construction 
of the Novel." The major 
required him to write one 
novel per year for his three 
upperclassman years. 




LUTTMANN'S 



Fine Leather Goods • Luggage • Pens 

20 Witherspoon Street • Princeton 

609»924-0004 

http://www.luttmanns.com 



SUNDAYS THROUGH THURSDAYS j 

BUY ONE DINNER 
GET 2nd ONE 1/2 PRICE 

2nd dinn«f must be ot equal ot leue< value 



May not be combined with ottiei ofters f xp«e5 8,'3 1 ,'00 



restaurant & catering 
SP ANISH MEDITERRANEAN CUiS INE 

Enjoy Fine Dining in a relaxed atmosphere 
• TERRACE DINING AVAILABLE • 



Upon graduation, he 
returned to Princeton with 
the novels — all three of 
which he k>st in a house fire, 
which he started accidentally 
in his parents' home with a 
cigarette. He now lives in 
New York City where he is a 
freelance writer ax\d musi- 
cian. 

A Gathering of Spies, Mr. 
Altman's first published nov- 
el, pits a female Nazi agent 
carrying secrets from Los Ala- 
mos against a British Ml 5 
agent, bearing his own 
secrets. The book has been 
praised by a number of crit- 
ics, including best-selling sus- 
pense novelist Stephen 
Coonts, who caUed it "A siz- 
zling zinger of a classk: spy 
story." 



Mini Catering-Oft Premises 
20% OFF 

ANY 
CATERING 

I May not be combined with oltiet otters 
Exp 8/31/00 



Ci 



Half Tray Each 

TOSSED SALAD 

& PAELLA 

VALENCIANA, '39.95 

I May not be combined wif' ■ <■ ^ 
I Exp a/31'OC' 



47B Route 206, Princeton • 609-497-2774 

Open tor Lunch: Tues-Fridoy 1 1 30 to 3 
Dinner: Tues-Tlujr 6-9; Frl & Sot 5-iaSunday3-9 





John Ahman 



RRECISION 
CUXTINCB 

by our new york 
trained staff 



THED ANGLE 

• 3B2 Nassau Street • Free JPaxking. 



a REPAIR 

Princeton Shopping Center 

984-6920 



f^Glendale's 

4040 Quakerbridge Rd • Lawrenceville • 609-587-0333 
Kendall Park Shopping Center • 732-297-2224 



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i_-'arr* 



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" Artfully 
Rendered. 



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rorm, color, light, texture... wc create rooms that are a study 

in the elements ot fine art. Our renowned crattsmanship 
and discriminating design will inspire the heart of your home. 

Sit 

Kitchens Unique, Inc. 

BY LOIS 
Kikhtn^ Baths Home Offices Home Theatres Libraries Furniture Specialty Tiles 

Visit Our Showroom at 259 Main Street in Chester, NJ 
or Call 908.879.6473 



YOU FEEL BETTER 

AFTER GENTLY SOAKING 

IN THE WATERS AT A SPA, 

RIGHT? 





•^ «>Mi»iy»i»w-i 



So DO YOUR CLOTHES. 



Miele 



Introducing Miele Wet Cleaning, tlie 
freshest, gentlest new cleaning system ever 
developed: safe for your clothes, better for the environment, kind 
to chemically-sensitive skin. Trust wet cleaning to pamper your 
most delicate silks, w(x>lens, linens and rayons like a day at a spa, 
leaving them soft to the touch, with a fresh, clean sc-ent. You'll also 
notice the difference witli casual wear, from khakis to golf shirts. 
Wet cleaning: Miele perfected it, we have it, and you will lo\'e 
what it does for your most cherished garments. 



Come in and try it today 



22.5 NiLssaii .Sirett, I'linccton 
Ample Parking Available 
I'lione 609-924-3242 

Hours: Mon-Fri. 7:30 am to 7 pin 
Sat. 8 am to 5 pm 



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C L E A N/E R S 



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Palmer 
Square 

downtown" PRINCETON 

supliisi iiah'ti slioppiliL* 

*'\* (^11<MU Cilleries 

,//i>//- H'i'f' c' Sill lOam-bpm 
Thiir.' c^ tri 10ani-9pm * SiiiuKm Noon -5 pm 

www.palmersquare.com 




Featuring Fine ^ine and Gourmet Foods 

We're more than 
a fine wine store! 

party goods • delicatessen 
large selection of wines, beer& liquor 



PriiHeton-Hiifhmiwn 
i Cranbun Roudi. 
Pniueion Junction, 
SJm50 

609-799-0530 




Houn: 

Mon-Sat H a.m. ■ 9p.m. 
Sun 10 a.m. ■ 5p.in. 





For V> 

Your Summer Treat ^ 
Thomas Sweet now carries: 

Sour Balls 

Fruit Slices 

Crystal Mints 

Gummi Bears 

Coffee Chews 

Licorice Pieces 

Raspberry Gels 

Teenee Beanees 

Butterscotch Hard Candy 

Sugar & Salt Free Hard Candy 









ChecaMc M !jdi lii^ Sun 11 6 
IcaCraVK Sun M T WI1 6 

Thll 9 Fn&SaMin 



Chocolate • Coffee 

Mofl TlHKs&Sunll 11 
fniSal 11 midniow 



§^® 



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*4b 

Local Fare 

from Frittceton 's kiuhens 



Nam Nguyen 

Chilled Honey dewSoup 
with Mint & Lime 

Very easy & delicious, but make sure your honeydew shows 
signs of being perfectly ripe: a creamy color on the outside and a 
strong fragrance before it's cut. 

1 medium ripe honeydew melon 
(4'/2 lbs), cut into chunks (6-8 cups) 

'/i cup fresh lime juice 

2 tbsp. fresh minced mint 
Blueberries for garnish 

Place everything, except blueberries in a blender. Puree until 
smooth. (You may need to do this in several batches.) Transfer 
to a container with a lid and chill until very cold. Give each 
serving a few blueberries and another sprinkling of chopped 
n'.int for a refreshing treat on a hot summer's day. 



TwinFish 



• 609-924-4975 • 



Our 

CHICKEN POT PIES 
are available at 
Nassau St. Seafood 
& Whole Earth 




More to Come .. 
favorite recipes. 



Watch this space weekly jor Princeton's 

. Provided by L^iin Smith. Town Topics 



Sponsored by: 




Vhole Ecirfh 



miHciToiff MATUMAL rooDf eiie<iiiv 

• SIMCI If 70 • 

360 NASSAU STREET PRINCETON 609 924-7429 

ORGANIC PRODUCE • WHOLE GRAIN BAKERY 

VEGETARIAN OEU • NATURAL COSMETICS & BATH PRODUCTS 

COOKBOOKS & BOOKS ON NATURAL HEALING 



Ride for Runaways Ends 
July 15, at Local Mall 



joined forces this year to 
sponsor the ride. Monetarv 
and other types of contribu- 
This year's Anchor House tions are made by corporate 
Ride for Runaways, a 500- sponsors, as well, iricluding 
mile ride beginning in Natural Quaker Oats, Nabisco, Pepsi 
Bridge, Va.. on July 8, will Cola, and Kraft General 
anrive at Quakerbridge Mall, poods. as well as many local 
Route 1, on July 15. Riders businesses, 
ujll pass through the Blue p^^ ^^^ Information, call 
Ridge Mountains, scenic West y^^^ jj^^ ^^ ^^ ^nchoi 
Virgmia, and Amish country j^^^^ Foundation Office, at 
"- their way to their 



on 

wekome-home ceremony. 

This year will mark the 
22nd Ride, an annual event 
to raise funds for Anchor 
House, a home for homeless, 
runaway and abused children 
in central New Jersey and 
Bucks County, Pa. According 
to Ride officials, the Ride 
raised more than $375,000 
in 1999, from more than 
8,000 individual pledges. 

Funds are raised in several 
ways. Each cyclist must col- 
lect a minimum of $750 in 
pledges, although the average 
amount per cyclist is closer to 
$2,000. 

The Times Newspapers, 
WHWH/AM and WPST/FM 
and Comcast Cablevision 



278-9495. 



Copies of* 

TOWN TOPICS 

dating back to 1946 

are now available on 

microfilm at the 

Princeton 
Public Library. 



it's NOT 

the same 

old routine. 




Enjoy something delicious. 

Why settle for mediocre Chinese or Pizza 
when you could have an eating experience of 
pure delight? Enjoy meals with new flavors and 
special twists. Our endless selection of unique 
gourmet foods will entice your palette. Once 
you've given us a tr>' you surely won't miss the 
monotony of the usual routine. 

For a lunch to savor, 
stop by or give us a call. 



Hlth Bon Afpilit 
tveryday can be a ctlebraUon! 



Princeton Shopping Center 
North Harrison Street 

609-924-7755 

Corporate Accounts Welcome 



ss*-^, 



^ 



Shop Here... 

...Live Longer! 

With all the great news 

about seafood and 

produce in your diet, 

you'll add years 

to your life every 

time you come to see us! 

Nassau St. Seafood & Produce Co. 
Your Seafood Professionals! 




(609) 921-0620 • Catering: 924-8406 

256 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 
Mon-Fri 8:30-7:00; Sat 9-6; Sun 9-3. (We deliver, too.) 

15 min. courtesy parking in front of store • FREE parking in our lot 










YOUR BEST RESOURCE 

FOR PERSONALIZED 

INTERIOR DEC ORATIN(; 

SERVICES 

Designer Fabncs 

Cuslum WiTik)* Trcainienli 

Wallpaper/Carptls & Cu.lom Rugs 

Upholstery * Slip Covers 

Fumilurt 

PRINCETON SHOPPING CENTER 

609-924-3367 

MOM K.^{^^lMl^^. A. I MHt<< »U!l k^ si H . H I •- 




w 



HOST I i 

HELPERS 1/ 1 

609-921-0990 /I p 

Bartenders / ■ '^ 
Servers 
Kitchen Help 

Full Service 

Party 

Rentals 



'J(pBinson s 
9-Comemade ChocoCates 

Over 100 varieties of ctiocolates 

Rl 206 & Monlgomery Center • Rocky Hill • 609-924-1124 




LIBRARY STAFF HONOREES: Leslie Burger (left), Princeton Public Library 
Director, and Harry Levine (right), President of Trustees, with staff members 
honored for their length of service to the library: Linda Simon, Elinor Riddle, 
Barbara Bradsell, DeAnna Wynne, Barbara Ackerman, Jane Clinton, and Eric 
Greenfeldt. Missing from picture are Elba Barzelatto, Terri Nelson, and Bar- 
bara Silberstein. 



Library Board Honors 
Long«Tenn Employees 

Ten Princeton Public Libra- 
ry staff members were hon- 
ored at the June Library 
Board of Trustees meeting for 
their length of service to the 
library and its patrons. 

According to Library Direc- 
tor, Leslie Burger, the com- 
bined length of service of 
these staff members totals 
168 years. 



Harry Levine, president of 
the trustees, presented certifi- 
cates and monetary awards 
based on length of service to 



Circulation Department staff 
members, Barbara Ackerman 
(13 years), Barbara Bradsell 
(22 years), Elinor Riddle (15 
years), DeAnna Wynne (13 
years); 

And also Information Ser- 
vices Department staff, Elba 
Barzelatto* (15 years), Bar- 
bara Silberstein (16 years); 
Technical Services Depart- 
ment staff, Jane Clinton (24 
years), Terri Nelson (12 
years); Library Bookkeeper, 
Linda Simon (11 years); 
Assistant Library Director, 
Eric Greenfeldt (27 years). 



of these and all library 
employees enables the 
Princeton Public Library to 
continue providing excellent 
service to Borough and 
Township residents," said Mr. 
Levine. "We applaud you for 
your hard work and ongoing 
commitment to the library." 



"The continued dedication 



TOWN TOPICS 

is 
printed entirely 

on 
recycled paper. 




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It's jiisi not the same without wine. 

CLARIDGK WINK AND LIQUOR , 





/',,„•• I'-'i !/>■'/>/" '/'/ r\ „r. I OJ/ 'i/f>f' 



CHAMBERS WALK 

Summer Sizzles... 
Cool Off With Chambers Walk 

Call Us About: 

Pool Parties 

Barbeques 

Reunions 

Corporate Picnics 

Clam Bakes 

609-683-5439 • 609-695-9446 



INOUtGn 

56r\/ing Oysters 

or\ the half shell 

two sauces 

1/2 dozen 
9.95 



Sangria 

our own blend, 
a pitcherful 
or by 'the 

Eufo^Ameriean 

Wstro^l^ar 

301 N. Harrison St. • Princeton • 609.921.2779 

Open Saturday 1 1 :30-10; Sunday 5-9; Monday-Thursday 11:30-9:30 



pasta * ravioli * sauce * >ide^jpJWs • .sand- 
wiches • panini • home made eiiti^lPlisitv 
tray^^fljfcsto ♦ ciiiarcuterie • cheese' 

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san dwiches • panini ♦ home made entrees 

lareuterie ♦ cheese ♦ 
^ivioH * sauce • sides • 
m\mi • home made 
^mivT* antipasto • charcuterie * 
clieese • olives • bread • pasta • ravioli • sauce 

* sic^J(a1^^sa(J!^:i^^ iTroc 

made entrees • party trays « antipasto 

charcuterie ♦ cheese * olives • bread ♦ pasta • 

Brought to you by 

ravioli * sauce • ^llJ^Vlt * ^^^^^^'^'^''^^'^^^ * 
panmi * home ^^'^'rHl<^ ^'^^^ * 

antipasto ♦ chare? KITC4-I£N e * olives ♦ 

&MARKET ., ,, 

bread • nasta • ra tt- * ^^des • salads 

U I i- ciKi (./«>:♦*<.«. i IV www.lucy»r«vloll.eom 

830 State Road (Route 206 ) • Princeton • Phone 609-924-6881 • Fax 609-279-9118 
Hours: Monday-Friday 7:30-7:00 • Saturday 10:00-5:00 • Sunday Closed 





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Parking Meters 

Continued trom Page 1 
"The meter rate increases 
arc based on a user fee con- 
text," he said. "Only people 
that use our streets would 
picit up added costs." 

"We have to be very careful 
about the way we approach 
meter rates," said Council- 
woman Wendy Benchley. 
"We need to make every 
effort to support downtown 
merchants and restaurants. 
This is too big an increase." 
She urged Council to meet 
with merchants to come up 
with a compromise plan. 



$1.20 and 90 Cents? 

Mayor Reed came up with 
the suggestion of raising the 
Palmer Square rates to $1.20 
and the adjacent areas to 90 
cents, but no one picked up 
on the idea. Mr. Goldfarb, 
however, said that if every 
meter were raised 25 cents an 
hour, ♦^'c Borough would 
come close to achieving its 
revenue goals." 

"I can't believe $1.50 park- 
ing in Palmer Square is unrea- 
sonable," said Mr. Martindell. 
"This is the premier parking 
spot in central New Jersey." 



gested it might be appropriate I 
to increase the amount of the | 
$18 fine for meter violation. 



In addition to the mer- 
chants and restaurateurs who 
have strenuously rejected the 
meter rate increases, 2578 
people signed a petition 
against the idea. 

As he has on many occa- 
sions, Councilman David 
Goldfarb raised the issue of 
setting up a Special Improve- 
ment District (SID) in the Bor- 
ough. He said this was the 
kind of mechanism to have in 
place to deal with issues such 
as meter rate increases. 

Improventent District 

An SID functions by placing 
an additional tax on mer- 
chants, with the money then 
used for the betterment of the 
improvement district. One of 
the best known SIDs was 
established in Manhattan's 
Times Square, which has 
undergone an enormous 
cleaning-up and massive 
changes. 

"Let's draft an [SID] ordi- 
nance and tell merchants we 
will discuss it," urged Mr. 
Goldfarb. "If we start to move 
ahead with a garage, we have 
to have an SID in place." 



There were surprisingly few 
business owners in the audi- 
ence, given the high interest 
in the topic. Logan Fox, co- 
owner of Micawber Books, 
was there, and he told Coun- 
cil they had no idea of the 
anger about meters he and 
other merchants see on a day- 
to-day basis.. "It does keep 
people away. On Saturday 
and Sunday we get outsiders, 
and we need outsiders." 

He said that raising meters 
every time the Borough has a 
shortfall is not the thing to 
do, and asked if Palmer 
Square would make the first 
hour free in their garages so 
people could easily come into 
town to take care of brief 
errands. The second hour, he 
said, could make up for the 
first. 



Mr. Goldfarb also said that 
a $1.50 meter rate raises a 
lot of questions, and that 
"there is something to be said 
about the shock of a 100 per- 
cent increase." 

A reminder of the need to 
generate an additional 
$200,000 in revenue was 
offered by Councilman Ryan 
Stark Lilienthal. "If we lower 
the rate we should look at 
extending the hours," he said. 



Mr. Goldfarb was critical of 
Palmer Square on several 
counts. First, he said he had 
spoken to Palmer Square 
about their garage rates with 
very little effect. Second, he 
said that Palmer Square had 
satisfied its legal requirement 
with the Planning Board to 
provide parking, but then set 
the rates so high that nobody 
who is a shopper is willing to 
pay them. 

"This is a brute force way of 
raising revenues," said Leo 
Arons of The Gilded Lion, 
who is a member of the Traf- 
fic and Transportation Com- 
mittee.. "There are alterna- 
tives. Each time there is a 
shortfall you raise meters. 
This has to stop sometime. 
The time is now." 



JUNCTION 



33 Princeton-Hightstowrffid 
Ellsworth s Center 
(Near Tram Station) 

799-8554 

Tues-Fn 10am-6;00pm; 
Sat 8am-3 30pm 



Irv Urken, of Urken's Hard- 
ware, suggested that 10-hour 
meters be extended to non- 
metered streets, and that the 
meters operate Sunday after- 
noons, after church services. 

Several members of Council 
seemed interested in having a 
plan that would provide incre- 
mental increases in meter 
rates over a number of years, 
if for no other reason than to 
keep the issue out of the 
headlines. Mr. Goldfarb sug- 



DOES YOUR FAMILY NEED 
FINANCIAL HELP? 



The Chocolate Cat is prepared 
to make a gift of money to 
families that face unexpected 
or short-term problems. 

Repayment is not necessary. 
There are no strings attached. 



The only requirement is that within one year you 
must help someone else in some way just as you 
have been helped. Write us a letter and tell us 
your story. 

Post Office Box 85 
Kingston, New Jersey 08528 

'^ . 




"I have the sense we're 
refusing to decide some basic 
questions," said Mr. 
Martindell. "We're pushing it 
back to staff, and staff will 
have to make policy 
decisions." 

Mr. Peters will bring his 
recommendations on an 
increase in meter rates, and 
possibly an extension of 
hours, to the July 18 Council 
meeting. At last week's meet- 
ing, he said he might try to 
bring an increase to one dol- 
lar in certain areas, look at 
long-term meters, and raise 
rates at meters that weren't 
raised in 1998. He also said 
he believed meters should go 
to 8 p.m. since there is no 
movement of cars at night. 

— Myma K. Bearse 



PERENNIALS • POTS OF ANNUALS 

BUDDLEA • DAYLILIES 

ORNAMENTAL GRASSES 

Lawn & Garden Fungicides & Insecticides 

Summer Lawn Fertilizers • Mulches 

Deer & Animal Repellents 

FRIENDLY & EXPERT SERVICE 
Hours: Mon-Fri 8-5; Sat 8-4; Closed Sundays July & August 



OBAL'S 

"For the very best" 



516 Alexander Rd., Princeton, NJ 
(At the Canal) 

LANDSCAPE CONSULTANTS 

452-2401 



Summer Sale on Accessories! 





Kevin 

FURNITURE GALLERY 

^ hne Handmade rumiture, Ughting and [Tistinctive Accessories 

Located behind The Lambertville House • 28B Bridge Street • Lambertville, NJ 
Tel 609.397.7887 • Fax 609.397.7889 • email: kkopil@together.net • www.kevinkopil.com 



PARDON THE MESS 



After years of planning, revising, designing, 

and redesigning, the Whole Earth Center's 

parking lot is finally being paved! 

During construction, our parking spaces will be limited ancJ our lot may be full- 
particularly during ou> peal: shopping hours. We apologize for any delays 
this will cause and we will work hard to limit the inconvenience to our customers. 

If our lot is full, please use the metered spaces on Nassau Street. 

There is also parking on the sun-ounding side streets. 

(Please take careful note of posted restrictions on hours and no parking zones.) 

Our peak shopping hours are between 1 1 :30AM and 2PM. If you are able to 
shop during off-peak hours, you will find the lot less crowded. 

We thank you for your patience and 

invite you to enjoy a free cup of 
tea or organic coffee >vhilc you shop. 






Whole Earth Center 



NATURAL FOODS GROCERY • SINCE 1970 



360 NASSAU STREET • PRINCETON • 609.924.7429 



HOURS:M.W 9AM-7PM 
f^ TH-F 9AM-9PM 
^B SAT 9AM-7PM 
mm SUN 10AM-5PM 




Checks should be made out 
to the Kingston Garden Club. 
Tickets and maps will be 
available the day of the tour. 

The club welcomes new 
members. It is not necessary 
to be a resident of Kingston 
to join. Meetings are held the 
first Monday of each month 
at 7:30 p.m. To become a 
member, call Club president 
Karen Under, at 683-0483. 




DRAPERIES 

Mon-Sat 10-5»Thurs 10-9 
Kingston Mall • Route 27 • Kingston. NJ 

609-683-0666 



CO 

3D 



PLANNING A BALL: The Bastille Day Ball, to benefit Trinity Counseling Ser- 
vice, will take place on July 8, at Drumthwacket. Planning the event are, 
standing, from left. The Rev. Peter K. Stimpson, executive director, Tnnlty 
Counseling Service; Brian Markison, Bristol Myers Squibb; and Elliott W. 
Wislar, director. Fleet Investment Group. Fleet and Squibb are corporate 
sponsors of the event. Sitting, from left are Co-chairs Sophie Glovier and 
Anne Elise Matthews. Call 333-1145. 



rp 




will benefit the Kingston Gar- 
den Club and its conununity 
beautification aiul educational 
outreach projects. 
The five gardens that will 

Kingston barden UUb self-guided walking or driving 
Will Sponsor Tour tour are primarily the cre- 

The Kingston Garden Clubj^^^^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^ themselves. 
wUI sponsor a tour of five pri-^^ United budgets and lim- 
vate gardens in Kingston on j^gj time. 

Saturday, July 15, from 10 to 

2. TTjc rain date is Sunday. ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^lub pre- 

"5!_ u J * .u * ^i sidents garden, for example, 
On the day of the tour, tick- ^^^^ ^ exuberant dteplay 
ets may be purchased at 14 ^^j ^^^^^^ ^ ^^ informal, natu- 
Basln Street, Kingston. Gen- ^ ^^^ Easy-care perennials 
eral admission will be $10; ^^ ^j^^^s predominate. This 
senior citiien discount tickets ^^^ features mature spccl- 

'f.u'* '^.^J^^^.^ j«!!!?niens of several low- 
children will be admitted free 



All proceeds from the tour 



nnaintenance plants, iiKluding 



Support Sources 

H.O-P^ (Helpfaig Otli«r PeofM* E^«»^): « *«*: 
week educatkm and support program for recently wfclowed 
men and women of all ages, is accepting registrations for 
the Summer Series, beginning this week. D^ «nd evwiing 
classes wUl be avaibble In Mercer County. Reglstratkms 
ckMe alter the third meeting. To receive InformatkMi, or to 
rS^er. call H.O.P.E.. at 1-800-9664488. extenston 
788. 



many types ot ornamental 
grasses; 35 varieties of daylil- 
ies, which shoukl be at their 
peak at the time of the tour; 
and a rich selcctton of hearty 
perennials. A bountihJ vege- 
table garden Is also on the 
property. 

A one-acre garden featuring 
rock walls, rock borders, 
designer rocks, field stor»e, 
blue stone, river rocks, and 
glacial till, from Virginia, 
West Virginia, Pennsylvania, 
South Carolina, New Jersey 
and the Rhone Valley In 
France Is on the tour. Shrubs, 
perennials, and annuals cre- 
ate a unique bird-watching 
sanctuary anud the rocks. 

A 4-year-old cottage garden 
is another tour highlight. Its 
informal and semi-structured 
"garden rooms" provide 
many comfortable niches on 
the property. 

For more Information about 
the tour — or to order 
advance tickets, contact 
Renee Kumar. 966 Ridge 
Road, Monmouth Junction 
08852. or caU 683-3830. 



Michael Miller is pleased to announce 




is Moving North up Route 27 to 



L" 



Princeton Garage 



3860 Route 27, Princeton 

(Two Miles North of the Amish Market) 

Call for an appointment 

609-924-7727 

or visit our website at princetongarage com 



SPECIALIZATION: 

AIR CONDITIONING • AUTO DETAILING 

STATE-OF-THE-ART 4-WHEEL ALIGNMENT 



m 






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OUTDOOR ESTATE 
TEAK FURNITURE 

First Quality Plantation Groivn Solid Teak 
Dining Settings Tables & Chairs 



Benches 

Round Tree 
Benches 



Steamer & 

Poolside Loungers 

Planters 



And much more 

TEAK MART 

Cranbury, NJ • Freehold, NJ 

609-655-9099 (fax: 609-655-9783) 732-3084232 

email: tline@erols.com • By Appointment 




The Arthritis Foondation. New Jersey chapter, has 
launched a new help line caDed "Arthritis Answers to 
provide support and infonnation to people with artiritte. 
The Foundation seeks to extend the number of arthritis 
patients served by providing die most up-todate general 
Information on various forms of arthritis, rheumatic disease 
cs, and assodatwl musculoskeletal condltkMis. 

Arthritis sufferers are also Invited to contact the Arthritis 
Foundation, New Jersey chapter, for a hw brochure about 
gardening and arthritis. The brochure InchKtes inlonnatio" 
about getting started, planning your time, arrangh^ a 
garden to suit the gardeners needs, and using the right 
equipment and plants to maximize enjoyment Call 8«»- 
467-3112, or visit the Foundations web site, at 
r.arthrttls.org. 



The Greater Philadelphia chapter of the ALS 
AModatioii will meet on Saturday, July 8, from 1 to 3, 
at the LawrenccvlUe Municipal Building, Route 206. 
dhectly south of 1-295/95. Facilitator Cathe Fricrnf ra- 
cemes an ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease) patier^. *^ »J^ 
lies and friends, as weU as anyone Interc^^ In teaming 
more about ALS. For more Information, call Ms. Frierman, 
at 394-3556. 

A Brwwt C«ie«r SamKMrt meeting «J1 take pla« 
at the Princeton Breast Institute. 842 State Roe«Ueco^ 
floor, on July 17. at 12:30. For more Information, cal 
924-1528, 

The Princeton Senior Resource Center will sponso' » 
C«ngiv«r»* Support Groop meetii^ on Ju^ ii, 
frj^^^n^. FjSStated by Beveriy A. Zola, » llc«»»d 
Seilo^lLselor, the group wlU ^}\oMpJ^ 
Lpons&te for the care of f^^J^^ZZ^^ 
baCe between caregMng and *=art^*<>/.*^^^J^ 
group is open to community members, but registration is 
Squwted. Call 924-7108. 

Hrroos wffl hokl a PF1A6 (Piaf«rt», FMrfH*^ 

S^ndaHTlO. at Trinity Church, 33 Mercer ^ 
S2^atT45 pk. with a business tn^^ "Wj' 
SSnal operntocus^m m^ will foDow at 7.30. 
For mow tafonoation, caD 683-51 W. 





Gail F. Stern 



cHistorical Society Head 
Wins Statewide Award 

Gail F. Stem, the director 
of the Historical Society of 
Princeton, received the New 
Jersey Association of Muse- 
ums' John Cotton Dana 
award at its annual June lun- 
cheon meeting at the Stead- 
man Gallery at Rutgers' Cam- 
den campus. 

Director of the Society 
since 1993, Ms. Stem has 
overseen many successful 
exhibitions and education 
programs. 



The current exhibition, 
"Old Traditions, New Begin- 
nings," is co-sponsored with 
The Jewish Center of Prince- 
ton and is mounted at both 
sites — Bainbridge House 
and The Center's facility at 
435 Nassau Street. 

Ms. Stem served as mu- 
seum curator, then museum 
director, of the Balch Institute 
for Ethnic Studies In Philadel- 
phia, from 1979 to 1993. 
She has served on the boards 
of the American Association 
of Museums/International 
Council of Museums, the NJ 
Association of Museums, and 
the Mid-Atlantic Association 
of Museums. 



Boy Scout Troop 40, 

West Windsor recently held a 
Court of Honor at which rank 
ddvancements and Merit 
lodges were awarded. 

A Life Scout award went to 
Eric Zahn. Ben Skidmore 
received the Star Scout 
Award. Achieving the rank of 
Second Class were Robert 
Abraham, Michael Hicks, 
Daniel Ibanez, David Colbert, 
and Kevin Huang. Michael 
Hicks also made Tenderfoot, 
dong with Matt Mazur. 

The rank of Scout was 
awarded to Daniel Brought- 
on, Ian Clark, Tim Forrester, 
Andrew Grzywacz, Sam Har- 
rison, Dan Jankowski, 
Andrew Lavandera, Jason 
Lee, Michael Makai, Andrew 
O'Shaughnessy, Michael Perl, 
Ryan Smart, and Logan 
WUder. 

Merit Badges were awarded 
to Brian Iselin, Aviation, 
Canoeing, Citizenship in the 
Nation, Communications, 
Family Life, Music, and Traf- 
fic Safety; Zain Zayecd, Fam- 
ily Life; Ben Skidmore, Per- 
sonal Management and 
Communications. 

Chris Reil and Michael 
Meers received the For God 
and Country religious award. 
Ryan Gaylo and Eric Zahn 
were elected to the Order of 
the Arrow; and Drew Gaylo 
achieved Brotherhood in the 
Order of the Arrow. 

Scoutmaster Chris Gaylo 
led the Court of Honor at the 
First Presbyterian Church, 
Dutch Neck, where Troop 40 
meets on Monday nights. 



John Cotton Dana, for 
whom the award is named, 
was the first director the 
Newark Museum, in 1909. 
He wanted musetims to be of 
practical value to all Newark 
citizens, and to be "hzuid- 
maidens of the schools." In 
its annual presentation of the 
Dana award, the NJ Associa- 
tion of Museums honors both 
the recipient and the memory 
of Dana, a museum pioneer. 

AARP Driving Conrae 
To Be Held at Hoqiitai 

An AARP "55 AUvc/ 
Mature Driving Course" 
will take place on Monday, 
July 14, and Tuesday, July 
25, from 10 to 2, in the 
ground floor conference 
room of the Medteal Cen- 
ter at Princeton, 253 With- 
erspocm Street 

The program wtn bei»«- 
aented in two separate s»- 
dons. PreHregfartration is 
reqiib«d; and there is an 
$8 fee for eadt partici- 
pant. Spaces will be 
assigpied on a first-onne, 
flr«t served ba^. Umdi 
may be purchased in the 
Medical Colter dining- 
room; or participants miv 
brtais their own. 

For more Informaflon, 
caJ] AARP representative 
Don RobbltM, at 655> 
1061. To make a reserva- 
tkm. caO Carol Sdrier- 
befffli, In the Medical 
Centar't pub&c relations 
office, at 497-4191. | 



Robert Shinn, commis- 
sioner of the NJ Department 
of Environmental Ptotcctlon 
(DEP), will speak at the gen- 
eral membership meetirig of 
the Chamber of Com- 
merce of the Princeton 
Area on Thursday, July 13, 
at the Doral Forrestal. 

The meeting will begin at 
11:30, with a reception, fol- 
lowed by the speaker's pre- 
sentation and a buffet lun- 
cheon. The comn\issk}ner's 
remarks will focus on the 
effect that devek>pment and 
growth have on the quality of 
life and the envirormient. 

Commissioner Shinn, has 
headed the DEP since 1994, 
loi>ger tlian any other com- 
missioner in the department's 
29-year history. He served for 
26 years as an elected official 
at local, county, and state lev- 
els, devoting much of liis 
energy to open space, pine- 
lands, and farmland preserva- 
tion, water supply, and solid 
waste management issues. 

At the time of his nomina- 
tion as commissioner, Mr. 
Shinn was a state assembly- 
man. He authored New 
Jersey's Water Supply Critical 
Area Law, wtikh gives the 
state authority to manage 
threatened surface and 
groimd water resources. He 
also wrote the law regulating 
the handling and disposal of 
medical wciste. 

The cost to attend the 
meeting will be $28 for 
Chamber members; $30, for 
other guests. To make a res- 
ervation, caD 520-1776. 



The Boheme Opera 
Guild is sponsoring a bus 
trip to New York City on 
Wednesday, July 26. 

Departure time is 8:45 a.m. 
sharp, from Burlington Coat 
Factory in the Lawrenceville 
Shopping Center. The bus 
will return at approximately 7 
p.m. 

Upon arriving in New York, 
the bus will make two stops: 
Times Square (Theater Area) 
and American Museum of 
Natural History/Rose Center 
for Earth and Space/Hayden 
Planetarium. (Admission fee: 
$14 for senior citizen.) 

The $20 cost per person 
includes bus fare only and 
does not include lurK:h or 
admissions. 

For Information call Peggy 
Yengo, 883-0326 or Louise 
Schloenbach, 896-2213. 



Giri Scouts to Hold 
Summer Activities 

The Princeton Girl 
Scouts will hold a program 
of Slimmer activities at the 
Witherspoon Street Pres- 
byterian Church Fellow- 
ship Hall, for five consecu- 
tive Tuesdays, from 1 to 4, 
starting Ju^ 11. All girls 
from age 5 through age 1 8 
are welcome. 

There is no charge; early 
registration, however, is 
important, because only 
30 girls per day may 
attend. 

Cooking lessons, a wild- 
life workshop, and a ses- 
sion on using aiKl conserv- 
ing energy arc among the 
subjects that will be cov- 
ered during the "Sunmier 
Fun Tuesdays." Girls who 
are not currendy registered 
scouts are welcome. 

For information, call 
683-0121. 



J ^incfow 

DESIGN CENTt* 



Custom Window Treatments 

609-924-0029 

NAME MtANOS AT A DISCOUNT 

Htsnteiual ' ComnmcaJ 
Fully Guannteed • frte Estiirutes 



JOSEPH J. FELCONE INC. 

^re ^ooks 

Fine books and autograph letters 

bought, sold, and appraised since 1972 

Princeton • 924-0539 



N.C. JEFFERSON 

Plumbing & Heating 

• Commercial 

• Residential 

• Free Estimates 

190 Witherspoon Street 

924-3624 

State Ucense Number 70B4 



"Fine Wine Affordably Priced'' 

Celebrates Christmas 
and Channukah in July! 

For one week only... 

10% OFF EVERYTHING 
IN THE STORE 

except beer. 



Okay. 

WE'LL GIVE YOU 10% OFF 
ALL CASES OF BEER. 

July 5, 2000 to 
July 11,2000 
save on 



everything 

from Absolut to Zwack. 



^^ * 



':WS^ 



Featured Wine of the Week 
Domaine Alary Daniel et Denis 

1998 Cuiranne Cotes du Rhone Villages. Quite possibly the best wine that we 
have had with firilled fodds in a long time. Ltnided with hrifiht berried fruit 
and a long peppery finish. Outstanding! 12.99. oops... $11.69 



234 Nassau Street • Princeton • 609-924-0836 



uty^ iNiKU 1 



CUSTOMER-FRIENDL Y PRICES! 
EVERYDAY DISCOUNTS ON 

BOOKS 

All hardcovers and 
paperbacks on the 

NY Times 
Bestseller List 

30% OFF 




U-STORE 



CUSTOMER-FRIENDLY HOURS! 

9to9 

NOV^ OPEN 

9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday-Saturday 

& Sun day 1 1 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

all year 

We're not just 

another bookstore. 

We have stripes! 



rinceton 



:i6 University Place • Princeton, NJ 08540 • f>09-921-8500 



The Princeton Pharmacy 

At the University Store Ground Floor 



WILL REMAIN OPEN DURING 

The University Store 

REMODEL 

Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. 
Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.nn. 
Sunday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.nn. 

FREE Delivery 

Senior Citizen Discounts 

CaU 924-4545 



JEWELRY & REPAIRS 

MANY REPAIRS 
WHILE YOU WAIT 

Custom Creations 
at affordable prices 

f^MCtTOII 

683-7133 



Unusual Gills 
i for Unusual 

\People 



Art, Jewelry. & 
Home Accessories 



Located at MB Jewelers 

McCaltrey's Stiopping Center 

Rt 57f 4 Souirilleld Rd 

West Windsor 

609-716.8106 



Decorator's 

Consignment 

Gallery 

Simply the best 

used furniture & 

accessories of the 

Princeton area. 



open Thursday 
through Siintby 
noon to () pm. 



Comer of 518 & Great Roail 
Just North of Princeton 



To ain.sign 

your better merchandise 

call ('iO)-4r>6-4^(00 




Patuda'A 

HAIR DESIGN 

357 Nassau Street 
683-4114 

specializing in 
long hair ♦ sculptured hair cuts 

perms ♦ style-dry ♦ sets 
color ♦ highlights ♦ hair relaxing 
t)ody & carefree curl 
Tues-Sat 8-5 




Megan Lynn Dubbi> 



Engagements 

and Weddings 



Engagements 

Dubbs-Leddy. Megan 
Lynn Dubbs, daughter of Mr. 
Jon Alan Dubbs and Mrs. 
Susan Manuel. Allentown, 
Pa., to Terence Robert Led- 
dy, son of Dr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Patrick Leddy, 
Princeton and Mantobklng. 

Ms. Dubbs Is a graduate of 
The Lawrenceville School and 
Lehigh University, Bethle- 
hem, Pa. She is employed by 
Merrill Lynch. New York. 

Mr. Leddy. a graduate of 
The LawreiKeville School and 
Colgate University. Hamilton, 
N.Y.. is employed by Merrill 
Lynch, Manhattan. 

An August wedding is 
pUuined. 



Mrs. James Cahill, Richboro, 
Pa. 

Ms. Shaughnessy graduated 
summa cum laude from 
Creighton University. Omaha, 
Neb., and is a third-year law 
student at the University of 
Colorado College of Law, 
Denver. She is employed as a 
summer law association in 
the Denver office of Arnold 
aikl Porter. 

She has accepted a clerk- 
ship with the Honorable Jus- 
tice NaiKy Rke of the Cok>- 
rado Supreme Court, 
effective upon graduation 
from law school. 



Shaaghnc>sy«Cahill. 

Meaghan Maureen Shaugh- 
nessy, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Michael Shaughnessy. 
St. Paul, Neb., to Andrew 
Forrest Cahill, son of Dr. 
Teena Cahill and Brooks 
Dyer, PrtaKeton, and Dr. and 



Mr. Cahill Is a 1990 gradu- 
ate of The Hun School. He 
holds a B.S. degree in electri- 
cal engineering from the Uni- 
versity of Denver, and an 
M.S. degree in electrical engi- 
neering from the University of 
Cok>rado. He is employed as 
the manager of engineering 
for Soft-Imaging Systems In 
Lakewood, Colo. 

The wedding will take place 
on July 29, In Denver. 



J L 



I \ I \ - \ r \ ■ -^ ''J ' » r I i vTTVnTTTTT 



I JJ^i',- MIDitT II t^J^JKj ' 



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The resources 
to excel. 

The chance 
to explore. 

The courage 
to leaa. 

The faith 
to malce a difference. 

The confidence 
to succeed. 

STUART. 

IZOO Stuart Road, 
Princeton, NJ 05540 

Ilduciting mrl.s Prc-School 

through Grade 12, 

boy-s Prc-5chool cxilij. 





Meaghan Shaughnessy and Andrew Cahill 

ASHTON-WHYTE 

Fine Bed Linens • Table Linens 
Furnishings • Toiletries 



51 North Tulane Street 
Princeton NJ 08542 
phone 609 921 2827 

434 Greenwich Street 
New York NY 10013 
phone 212 777 8282 



EASTRIDGE design 



■«ii>wnaaaMMaa>**<*«'4u»*je:^ir ' 



esi 



Sandra Grundfest, Ed.D. 

Licensed Psychologist — Career Counselor 

609-921-8401 



Drug Abuse Counseling and Therapy 
Offered By Arnold M. Washton, Ph.D. 




< 

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i^aiai 
M^aa 

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LHtLi^ttiLn ftnij 

PRlNf ETON'S PREMIERE HAIR COIORINC 
STUDIO FOR WOMEN AND MEN 



60'M)24-1824 
14 Spring Siretl • Princeton, N| ()H')40 



Taking that first step to 
get help can be the 
hardest, points out ad- 
diction psychologist Arnold 
M. Washton. 

For people struggling with 
alcohol and substance abuse, 
just being willing to admit the 
problem and discuss It Is a 
major step forward. The rela- 
tionship with the drug is so 
strong and intense that even 
though they come In voluntar- 
ily, patients are still ambiva- 
lent about stopping drug or 
alcohol use. 



o 



o 



COMPARE PRICE 

ON ANY CAMERA. 
CALL 609-924-7063 

Any 35mm, Digital, 
APS, or Video Camera 



USED CAMERAS WANTED! 

Trade or Cash 



NEW YORK CAMERA 

173 Nassau St • Princeton • M-F 8:30-6; Sat. 9-5 




IT'S NEW 

To Us 



Now Dr. Washton' s prac- 
tice, both in Princeton and 
New York, specializes in the 
treatment of chemically- de- 
pendent healthcare profess- 
ionals and business execu- 
tives. He also sees other pa- 
tients, from high school 
students to senior citizens. 

He serves as Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Psychiatry at the 
NYU School of Medicine; as 
chief consultant on alcohol 
and substance abuse in the 
Department of Psychiatry at 
Lenox Hill Hospital; and as 
Affiliate Psychologist In the 
Department of Psychiatry at 
the Princeton Medical Center. 




Founder of the first cocaine 
hotiinc in the U.S. In 1982, 
he is an internationally known 



ADDICTION HELP: 'Hlie initial exposure to drugs is 
usually in a social situation. At first, drugs can have 
a reinforcing value to the person. For example, H 
someone is in turmoil or distress, and the drug 
relieves that, then the value of the drug becomes 
more meaninghji." Arnold M. Washton, Ph.D. helps 
people who are struggling with alcohol and sub- 
stance abuse. 



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Dr. Washton, who practices clinician, researcher, and au- 
at 256 Bunn Drive as well as thor, and has received re- 
in Manhattan, has been treat- search grants from the Na- 
ing patients with these addic- tlonal Institute on Drug 
tions for 25 years. He Is a Abuse, 
licensed psychologist, with a Helping people to overcome 
proficiency certification in ad- drug abuse is daunting, and 
diction fjsychology from the Dr. Washton Incorporates be- 
American Psychological Asso- havioral and psychological 
elation. College of Profession- therapy, with a practical em- 
al Psychology. phasis. Always, the first step 

After graduating from New is Intunediate abstinence. 
York University with a Vnique Service 

bachelors degree, and then „_,,., . , «„, 
with a Ph.D. In psychology The kind of service I offer 
from City University of New is unique, he «cplains. This 
Yorit. he determined to spe- is not a cUnic. There are rela- 
clallze In addiction tlvely few real addiction spe- 
psychology. ^jalists. The special^ of ad- 

diction psychology has only 
Dramatic Results evolved over the last decade. 
"During my internship, I Addiction is a problem unto 
took part in a Harlem clinic Itself. Treat that, and then 
for heroin addiction," he re- you can treat the other prob- 
calls. "1 committed for three lems. Often there are co- 
months, and stayed for 10 existing psychiatric problems, 
years, eventually becoming di- Patients can have difficulty 
rector of the clinic. managing internal feelings, 

"Having grown up in the such as anxiety, anger, dlsap- 
Bronx, I had seen the ravages pointment, etc. 
of drug addiction. At the clin- Initially, he says, he and the 
Ic, I found the patients to be patient try to reach agree- 
fasclnatlng. Each was a ment about the goal. "It's 
unique Individual. And 1 saw about people, places, and 
people get better, often with things; getting rid of drug 
dramatic results." 



paraphernalia, getting rid of expect. I help them understand 
die dealer's number, avoiding that it's not unusual to see 
situations where drugs and al- mood changes, etc.. and start 
cohol are found, keeping to doubt the process. I give my 
j,ysy patients permission to resist 
the treatment." 



He emphasizes the Impor- The therapeutic process In- 
tance of establishing a thera- eludes a long-term Investment 
peutlc alliance with the per- of time and effort, he adds, 
son In a private setting, where noting that most of his pa- 
honesty and confidentiality tients have already seen gener- 
are key. *>' therapists. 

"These addicts are not dys- "Addiction Is a self- 
hinctlonal people," he ex- medication disorder, using 
plains. "The biggest challenge brain modifying chemicals to 
is to find my way into each alter internal feeling states," 
person's reality and to work he points out. "The most Im- 
within that, rather than Im- portant part Is teaching some- 
pose my reality. You start one coping skills and help 
where the person Is. I try to them recognize and make use 
find the best way to engage of internal feeling states." 
them. 

Everyone Is different, he 



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Providing superior education for students 
with learning differences. 

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ri'sideni 

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VV.icUworlh 



"I'm their coach and guide," adds, and he does not favor a 
he continues. "I'm on their single medKxl of recovery for 
side. I'm not here to judge all. He includes Individual and 
them. I'm here to facilitate group sessions, and also sees 
the process to help them get patients' families, 
where they want to go. I also "There's a lot to be said for 
focus on what Is right about going slowly and findin-g the 
them and their life, and help best treatment for each ;ndi- 
them feel secure. They al- vldual. For instance, group can 
ready have a lot of negative be very helpful, but groups arc 
feedback, and they feel their not good for everyone." 
life Is crumbling." 

Dr. Washton identifies three Dr. Washton emphasizes 
parts of the therapy: (1) that only a small percentage of 
breaking the cycle of acidic- p>eople who try clrugs become 
tlon. emphasizing abstinence, addicted. For those who do, 
which can take three months; however, he offers help. He 
(2) relapse prevention, three has treated thousands and 
to six months; and (3) psycho- thousands of patients, and 
therapeutic work. says that when people stop 

VUnr^ina *iian» taking drugs. they will revert 

Wammg Stgns ^^ ^^^^, behavior. 

"In the first sbc months of ,., ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ miraculous 

treatment, a patient may have ^^^^^^^^j^ .„ ^i^ ^ork. 

one or two setbacks, he ex- .^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ dramatic 

plains. The Pressures are ^^ ,^ ^ ^^,3^,,^, ,hort 

veiv serious. When dils hap-^^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^, p^. 

pens we have a relapse dc- ^jents ,00k better and think dif- 

K^"Ss ^S'L^tl^eTe ^-rt^-^ ^ °" ^^ 
drug Its a change in attitude, ^°^^ ^ e^oven/- 
moSd. behavior all leading Dr. Washton s se^ons are 
up to taking the drug. tVPically one hour, and can be 

a, . , ,7 , .. covered by insurance. Hours 

I help them recognize the . ' „i„»„onf dQ?- 

, , u u * * arc by appointment, '*yi 

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Contemporary to Classic Designs 
From Margaret Miller Interiors 



Nineteen years In busi- 
ness! Not so many es- 
tablishments achieve 
this degree of longevity any- 
more, and Margaret Miller 
Interiors can be proud of this 
accomplishment. 

"We have so numy regular 
customers and a very big net- 
ivork of referrals; there's a 
great deal of word-of-ntouth," 
says Interior decorator Marga- 
ret Miller, who opened Marg- 
aret Miller Interiors In 1981 
in the Kingston Mall on Route 
27. 



'We'll start with something In 
the house they like — an Ori- 
ental rug, a painting, their 
grandmother's Spode pitcher. 
Often, we'll find colors here 
they like, and color is 
crucial." 

Important ciuallties for a 
decorator are an eye for color 
and an ability to visualize, she 
adds. "The client has the ben- 
efit of working with someone 
who can walk you through It 
and help you see what can 
result. I have also been tokl I 
have a very good eye for 
color." 



"Originally, we were a wall- 

f^ paper store, with vertical and 

mini blinds and shades," she 

recalls, "h evolved into de- 

' sign, which is what I always 

' wanted to do." 

* The fcKus of Ms. Miller's 

j business is design, but her 

store also offers a wide vari- 

" ety of Items for purchase and 

' extensive room to browse. 

j Framed Art 

I Fabrics, accessories, fuml- 

< ture and framed art are all 

' available, covering a big price 

1 range from $12 up to the 

$ 1000s. Everything from 
I painted hutches to book ends 

, and brass birdcages to silk 

, flowers Is on display, as Is a 

I big selection of fabric samples 

, and also frame samples for 

) mirrors. 

' "We sell a huge amount of 

frarned art," says Ms. Miller. 
j3 "This evolved out of having a 

fri few pieces of art here to ac- 

cessorize vignettes, cmd now 
we have all styles and sizes, 
including prints and signed 
and numbered lithographs. In 
a medium price range. It's 
like having an art gallery on 
the side, and it's extremely 
popular." 

Helping her clients achieve 
the look that reflects their 
particular taste and persoruill- 
ty is Ms. Miller's biggest plea- 
sure, and she works with peo- 
ple of all ages and life-styles. 

"They are singles, couples, 
and all income levels." she 
notes. "These are people who 
have decided to seek profes- 
sional help. Having a decora- 
tor Is probably the best Invest- 
ment you can make. You'll 
end up not nriaklng mistakes." 






Ms. Miller takes on all sizes 
of Jobs, from one room to an 
entire house, and she has 
many customers for whom 
she has worked on all rooms 
in the house, including help- 
ing them when they move to a 
new home. 

"I move right along with 
them," she smiles. "I think my 
specialty Is coordinating a 
harmonious look to the 
house, so that the rooms flow 
Into each other, yet are differ- 
ent with a distinctive quality. 
It should look as though it has 
been decorated In one period 
of time rather than over a 
long time. It should be a com- 
plete l(X)k." 





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CREATIVE DESIGN: "I enjoy ttte creatraity, and I like 
working with people, especially helping them 
achieve wtiat they want, but dont always know how 
to express." Interfor decorator Margaret Miller is 
shown with her 10-year«ld canine companion, 
'iJnus." 




In many cases, clients are 
choosing to re-do the rooms 
in their house, rather than 
moving, she reports, and Ms. 
Miller helps them find their 
own look. 

"I try to develop their own 
taste. I'll ask many questions 
to determine a life-style — are 
there kids, pets, do they cook, 
have parties, arc they formal. 
Informal? A home should be 
lived In." 

Eye For Color 

Sometimes, clients are con- 
fused or uncertain, and then. 



Ms. Miller says that today 
people are more apt to 
choose a style that is lasting, 
and are not driven by the par- 
tictilar trend of the moment. 

"They are not decorating 
]ust to please or Impress their 
neighbors. They want to 
please themselves, and have 
the design fit In with their life- 
style. A Tuscany look is popu- 
lar today, with faded terra 
cotta. And tile is a favorite, 
h's easy to live with." 

Special Touches 

"Eclectic Is favored today, 
too," she adds, "and there Is 
a less contemporary look than 
there was 10 years ago. Peo- 
ple want a classic feeling. 
Also, when I finish a room, I 
like to leave a vacant spot, so 
the client can get a perfect 
piece of art to fill it. Accesso- 
ries are the easiest way to 
change the look of a room. 

"I especially enjoy helping 
to put In great accessories at 
the end of die project," she 
continues. "That's really how 
It's to look — when you put In 
the picture frames, the can- 
dlesticks, the fresh ftowers. 
The special touches that 
make the room special and 
make it your honw. This is 
hin!" 



Privacy is the key now. and 
wItkIow treatments are more 
opulent. Swags, festoons, 
trims. It's much more elabo- 
rate. Even In Informal rooms, 
people like dressed-up win- 
dow treatments." 

Ms. Miller's clients are from 
the PrirKeton area, as well as 
beyond. aiKl she works on all 
kinds of projects, including 
commercial and corporate, 
and recently completed a cor- 
porate headquarters. 

She charges a one-time 
consultation fee, which 
IrKludes a floor plant, coordi- 
nating the entire house, 
selecting carpet, drapes, hir- 
niture, etc. 
Projects vary In time, she 



notes, adding "With a big job. 
you and the client get to 
know each other very well!" 

It's Important to have a 
good relationship, she points 
out, noting, "Remember, this 
Is supposed to be fun. It's not 
a chore!" 

Ufe Is stressful today, she 
adds, and people want to 
have a space they can feel at 
hon>e in. "1 kx>k forward to 
making someone's house 
their home. I want them to be 
comfortable In their home." 

Margaret Miller Interiors' 
hours are Morulay through 
Saturday 10 to 5, Thursday 
until 9, and by appointment. 

683-0666. 

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Ms. Miller has seen a vari- 
ety of changes over the years, 
including the increasing popu- 
larity today of home offices. 
She also notes that "In win- 
dow treatments, verticals, 
shades and blinds are not 
quite as popular as before. 

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^ FINAL DAYS 

Closing July 30th 

Substantial 
Savings 

on 
Fine Furniture 
Lighting 
Original Art (Oils) 
Home Accessories 
Jewelry 
Gourmet Food 
Candles 
and 
lots of 
new arrivals 
from our warehouse 



609-397-4440 



=i 




(^ Mikhail Baryshnikov and the 

H White Oak 
Dance Project 



in 



"Past Forward" 



UU Prior to national tour! 

Cu Mr Baryshnikov will 

f— narrate and dance at 

<^ all performances. 

Thursday-Saturday, 
August 3-5 
at 8 pm 
BEST SEATING: 
Sunday, August 6 
at 2 pm 



Order tickets 
on-line at 
www.mccarter.org 

or call 

609-258-ARTS(2787) 

Pnnceton, New Jersey 







.i 



^ 



\ This pfogram is made possible m part by funds horn ttie New Jersey Stale Counal on me Ann 
\^ Oepartmenio* Stale and made possible m part by (unds from »ie National Endowmenllof the Arts 



•?u Jl OF SONG: Westminster Choir College will present its third annual Summer Song Festival 
with three performances in July. Developed by pianist J.J. Penna, who will serve as accompanist for 
«!i*b!1*!.' ^ . '•.^'*"' '*"" *«]»'*>'• « different dimension of the song repertorie. ranging from Kurt Weill 
fiJf £ ! '^■^. ° ***• •""•'««♦ ?*" o*"* «»«•• All performances begin at 7:30 p.m. in Bristol Chapel on 

li!.« S^r/Kl^ ^'T'*"** /^^'"'•c"*" '» ''••• W«*"'ed. ♦'•o'" "ett. are some of the artists: J.J. Penna, 
Laura Brooks Rice, Aurora Micu, Scott McCoy, and Marcia Roberts. 



17TH SEASON 



'PRINCETON 
BALLET SCHOOL 

Classes in ballet, modern, 
jazz & Spanish dance. 

609-921-7758 




PERFECT STORM 

Daily: 
1:30.4;15,7.9.30 (PG-13) 



SUNSHINE 

Daily: 
1,4:30,8:00 (R) 



HAMLET 

Daily: 
1:45.4:30,7:10,9:35 (R) 



JESUS' SON 

Daily: 
1:45,4:15.7:05.9 30 (R) 



PATRIOT 

Daily: 
1:30,4:45,8:00 (R) 



ME MYSELF IRENE 

Daily: 
2. 4:30, 7. 9:30 (R) 



Three Concerts 
Are Offered Free 
At Choir College 

Westminster Choir College 
of Rider University will 
present its third annual Sum- 
mer Song Festival with three 
performances in July. Devel- 
oped by pianist J.J. Penna, 
who will serve as accompanist 
for the series, each recital will 
explore a different dimension 
of the song repertoire, rang- 
ing from Kurt Weill and 
Broadway to the music of our 
own time. All performances 
begin at 7:30 p.m. in Bristol 
Chapel on the Westminster 
campus in Princeton. Admis- 
'sion is free. 

The program on Thursday, 
July 6 is entitled "New Voic- 
es." The final two decades of 
the 20th century saw a rea- 
wakening of song composi- 
tion in America. This concert 
examines the styles and 
trends among American song 
composers as they look for- 
ward to a new era of experi- 
mentation and invention. The 



program will include Joseph 
Schwantner's Black Anemo- 
nes; David Del Tredici's 
Acrostic Song; Aaron Jay 
Kemis' Smple Songs, and 
Tom Cipullo's Bobby Collins 
Songs. 

Serena Benedetti, soprano, 
and Scott Murphree, baritone, 
will perform. 



Serena Benedetti, soprano; 
Laura Brooks Rice, mezzo- 
soprano; Beth Miller, mezzo- 
soprano; Scott McCoy, tenor; 
and Elem Eley, baritone, will 
perform. 



June 17 



July 23, 

2000 at 

McCarter 

Theatre 



CARMEN 

Julys, 14 



FALSTAFF 

July 9, 15 



The program on Sunday, 
July 9 is entided "Uncommon 
Theatre: The Songs of Marc 
Blitzstein and Kurt Weill." 
Weill's music aggressively 
forged a new era in musical 
theater, fresh with a new- 
found social awareness and 



MUSIC & 
THEATER 



The program on Friday, 
July 14, is entitled "A Span- 
ish Songbook." It will feature 
the nuiny faces of contempo- 
rary Spanish song, including 
works by Falla, Turina, Mom- 
pou, Dorumsgaard, and Obra- 
dors, as well as Robert Schu- 
mann's Spanisches Lieder- 
spiel. 

Aurora Micu, soprano; 
Scott McCoy, tenor; Marcia 
Roberts, mezzo-soprano; and 
Christopher Judd, baritone, 
will perform. 



SIX CHARACTERS 

IN SEARCH OF 

AN AUTHOR 

July/, 12. 16,&22 



BURNING 
BRIGHT 

July 21 &23 



PRINCETON 
GARDEN THEATRE 

Fri. June 7-Thurs. July 13 

For schedule ot Weds., 7/5 & Thurs. 7/6 
please refer to previous week. 



ME, MYSELF 
& IRENE 

Fri: 7:15, 9:45 

Saturday & Sunday: 

2:00,4:30,7:15,9:45 

Monday-Thursday: 

6:45,9:15 



raw, biting sarcasm. His 
American theater works are 
filled with alternating 
moments of sublime lyricism 
and bluesy romp. 

Marc Blitzstein, best known 
as the English language trans- 
lator of Weill's Threepenni/ 
Opera, was a similar theater 
renegade who influenced 
countless generations of com- 
posers and introduced a new 
realism onto the Broadway 
stage. 

The program will include 
concert excerpts from Street 
Scene, songs by Blitzstein, as 
well as a medley of Weill's 
classic songs, arranged by 
Peter Wright. 

Margaret Cus^ck, soprano; 



Copies of 

TOWN TOPICS 

dating back to 1946 

are now available on 

microfilm at the 

Princeton 
Public Library. 



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Fri: 6:1 5, 9:30 * 

Saturday & Sunday: 

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Monday-Thursday: 

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due to last minute special screenioRS. 

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Concert Series 
Continues Jidy 9-15 
At Choir CoUege 

Westminster Choir College 
of Rider University continues 
Its 2000 Summer Concerts 
the week of July 9 with a 
hymn sing, a sing-in, a recit- 
al, three concerts, and two 
special Songfest recitals. 

On Sunday, July 9, 
Westminster's Songfest 2000 
scries of recitals continues 
with a program entitled "Un- 
common Theatre: The Songs 
of Marc Blitzstein and Kurt 
Weill," coordinated by J.J. 
Penna, a member of 
Westminster's piano faculty. 
Weill's music aggressively 
forged a new era in musical 
theater, fresh with a new- 
found social awareness and 
raw sarcasm. His American 
theater works are filled with 
alternating moments of sub- 
lime lyricism and bluesy 
romp. 

Marc Blitzstein, best known 
as the English language trans- 
lator of Weill's Threepenny 
Opera, was a similar theater 
renegade who influenced 
countless generations of com- 
posers and Introduced a new 



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PLAYING IN PETTORANELLO GARDENS: Queenl 
Esther as Titania and Obie A ward- winning David 



staoe"" tL 'n' n^r*^*!,^ ?r*:2f.Pf" " Bottom rehearse for Shakespeare's 



stage. The program will 
include concert excerpts from 
Street Scene, songs by 
Blitzstein, as well as a medley 
of Weill's classic songs, 
arranged by Peter Wright. 

Margaret Cusack, soprano; 
Serena Benedetti, soprano; 
Laura Brooks Rice, mezzo- 
soprano; Beth Miller, mezzo- 
soprano; Scott McCoy, tenor; 
Elem Eley, baritone; and J.J. 
Penna, piano, will perform. 



"A Midsummer Night's Dream," which playsl 
through July 23 at Pettoranello Gardens in Commu- 
nity Park North. 



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On Thursday, July 13, the 
Limburg Choir (a visiting 
choir from The Netherlands) 
will present a concert of 
sacred and secular vocal 
music at The Playhouse. 
Their vast repertoire includes 
a multitude of styles, and the 
group will perform music by 
composers such as Mozart, 



Unless otherwise indicated, 
all performances begin at 
7:30 p.m. in air-conditioned 
Bristol Chapel on the 
Westminster campus in 
Princeton, arnl they are open 
to the public at no charge. 
Westminster Choir College is 
located on the comer of 
Hamilton Avenue and Walnut 



On Monday, July 10, Sue Brahms and Rutter. The choir Lane 

BIcn Page will lead partici- Is a mixed voice choral To receive a complete list- 

pants in a hymn sing. Ms. ensemble composed of music ing of Westminster's summer 

Page is director of Choirs for f^^^.or advanced ama- concerts, call 921-7100 ext. 

Children and Youth at Nassau curs. Admission is free but a 307. por current information 

free-wili offering will be 



taken. 

On Friday, July 14, 
Westminster will present the 
final recital in the Songfest 
2000 series, "A Spanish 
Songbook." It will feature the 
many faces of contemporary 



Presbyterian Church in 
Princeton. 

She holds two degrees from 
Westminster, which has hon- 
ored her with the Alumni 
Award for "outstanding work 
in the field of children's 
music." Ms. Page currently 

teaches Choir Training for Spanish song, including 
Young Singers at Westmin- works by de Falla, Turina, 
ster. Mompou, Dorumsgaard and 
Obradors, as well as Robert! 

On Tuesday, July 11, Schumann's Spanisches 
Roger Briscoe, conductor! ^'^dersplel. Op. 74. 
will lead audience members 

in a sing-in of Brahms' Ein Aurora Micu, soprano; Mar- 
deutsches Requiem. Partici- cia Roberts, mezzo-soprano; 
pants are encouraged to Scott McCoy, tenor; Christo- 
bring their own scores; how- P*^*^ ^^*^' baritone; and J.J. 
ever, a limited number will be Penna, piano, will perform, 
available for borrowing at the On Saturday, July 15, stu- 
door. dents participating in the 

On Wednesday, July 12, Westminster Middle School 
participants in the High Vocal Camp week will per 
School Sob Artists work- 'o™ a "*" ' 
shops will perform a recital. a-n>.. 



about all performances call 
921-2663 ext. 308 weekdays 
between 9 a.m. and 4:30 
p.m. or 219-2001 for 24- 
hour concert information. 



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Current Cinema 

Titles arid times subject to change: call theatre 

PRINCETON GARDEN THEATRE, 683-7595 

Friday. July 7 - Thursday, July 13 
The Patriot (R): Fn , 6:15, 9:30; Sat , Sun . 2:45, 6:15, 9:30, 
Mon -Thrs , 7:45 

Me. Myself and Irene (R): Fn , 715, 9:45; Sat., Sun., 2, 4:30. 
7:15, 9:45; Mon. -Thrs , 6:45, 9;15 

MONTGOMERY CINEMAS, 924-7444 

Friday, July 7 - Thursday, July 13 
Ttie Patriot (R): 1 30, 4 45, 8 
Perfect Storm (PG 13): 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:35 
Me, Myself and Irene (R): 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 
Sunshine (R): 1.4:30,8 
Hamlet (R): 1:45, 4:30, 7:10, 9:35 
Jesus' Son (PG): 1:45, 4:15, 7:05, 9:30 

MARKETFAIR, 520-8700 

Friday, July 7 - Thursday, July 13 
Shaft (R): 1:25, 4:15, 7:20 10:15 
Chicken Run (G): 1 1 , 1 , 3: 1 5, 5:20, 7:30, 9:45 
The Patriot (R); 11 40, 12:45.3:10,4:30,6:45,8:15, 10:10 
The Perfect Storm (PG 13): 11:15, 12, 2:45. 330, 6:15, 7. 9:30. 
1030 

Rocky & Bullwinkle (PG): 1 1 30, 2, 4:30, 7:05, 9:40 
Scary Movie (R): 11:25, 1:55.4:25.7:10,9:15 
The Kid (PG): 12:05, 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45 

MERCER MALL, 452-2868 

Friday, July 7 - Thursday, July 13 
Fantasia 2000 (G) 12:45. 2:30, 4 25 
Mission Impossible 2 (PG 13): 1:30, 4:15. 7. 9:45 
Small Time Crooks (PG): 1 . 3:20. 7:25, 9:30 
Keeping the Faith (PG 13): 1:20, 410. 7:05. 9 35 
Big Momma's House (PG 13): 1:10. 3:30. 7:30. 9:50 
Gone in 60 Seconds (PG 13): 2. 4:30, 7:35. 10 
Boys and Girls (PG 13): 7:15, 9:20 
Gladiator (R): 1:45. 4:45. 7:50 
Me, Myself and Irene (R): 1:15. 3:50. 7:10. 9:40 
Big Kahuna (R) 1 40, 4, 7:20. 9:25 
Passion of Mind PG 13): 1:50. 4:20, 7:40. 9:55 



Off-Broadstreet Theatre 
Plans Summer Production 



The cast also iiKludes Drew 
Huricy, Pamela Wright, Rob 
Carcione, Catherine Rowe, 
The farce, Will You Still and Fred Schwab. 
Love Me in the Morning?, ^^ Houston has also 
will open at the Off- ^^ ^ Qff-Broadstrect 
Broadstreet Theatre July 14 productions of Abie's Irish 
for a seven-weekend run Hie ^^^ ^^j Triumph of Love. 

theater is celebrating its 16th 

anniversarv with this comedy _ , ,„ , , 

by Brian Clemens and Dennis Performances wiU run July 

c_ 14 to August 24. Curtain is 8 



Spooner 
Suzanne 



Houston of 



R LUE POINT 

*^ GRILL 



p.m. on Friday and Saturday 

„_, ^ J /^ ^ u and 2:30 on Sunday, with 

Princeton and Curtis Herr j^^^^^ ^^^^^j ^^ ^our 

star as Jeremy and Celia Win- g»_i|g, 

throp, newlyweds deciding to .. ' r_,. ,- 

finish their honeymoon with a ^ Admission Friday and Suii- 

qulet week at home. To their f V Is $20.50; Saturday Is 

surprise, they discover both * 

of Jeremy's partners have For reservations or informa- 

accepted the offer to use the tion, call the theater, located 

home for a small holiday. The at 5 South Greenwood Ave- 

even bigger surprise is that nue in Hopewell, at 466- 

each partner arrives with the 2766. 

other's spouse. 




Fresh fish. 
Friendly prices. 

Nofoofoo! 

Enjoy Front Patio Dining 



258 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 
609.921.1211 




Stony Brook WatenlMd 
Sets SoMKr Concert 

An outdoor summer con- 
cert featuring Good Mea- 
sure, for families and 
adults, will be hekJ Satur- 
day, July 15 at 8 p.m. at 
The Stony Brook-Millstone 
Watershed Association, 
Thus Min Road, HopeweU 
Townsh^. 

The group's repertc^ of 
lively dance music and 
plaintive slow airs is 
derived from die Irish and 
Scottish traditions and 
from Appaladtian tunes. 
New England contra danc- 
es, and the jigs and re^ of 
Cape BretMi, Nova Scotia. 

Cost is $7 for aduhs and 
$4 for (Mdren under 12. 
The conceit wlO be hdd 
oittdo(Mi bdrind the Butt* 
in^er Nature Center or 
indoors in the event of rain. 
Refreshments will be 

For information, call 
r37-7592. . 



Indian Devotional Songs 
To be Sung in Plainsboro 

Hindustani vocalist Mitali 
Banerjee Bhawmik will sing a 
concert of Indian devotional 
songs on SaUirday, July 15 at 
8 p.m. in the Robing Room of 
the Chapel at St. Joseph's 
Seminary in Plainsboro. 

She will be accompanied l>y 
Samlr Chattejee on tabla and 
Madhu Vora on harmonium. 
Sitarlst Daisy Pradis will also 
perform. 



A student of the maestro 
All Akbar Khan for more than 
20 years, Ms. Paradls is 
regarded as one of the few 
Americans who can give an 
authentic rendition of North 
Indian classical music. 

The Robing Room is on tfie 
ground floor of the Chapel. 
Attendees are invited to come 
early to enjoy the grounds or 
pk:iyc on the lawn. Ilckets 
are $15 general admission; 
$8 students. Call 252-9185 



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(Next to ShopRite) 

Mon Thut 11 30 9 30 Fn 11 30 10 30: 
Sal 12-10 30, Siin 12 00-9 30 






DOROTHY AND TOTO: Joanna Woodruff is Dorothy 
and Tigger plays Toto in "The Wizard of Oz," at the 
Open Air Theatre at Washington Crossing Park 
July 6, 7, 8, 12, 13, 14 and 15. 



The 

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Sit back and enjoy your meal 

while listening to our jazz pianist 

every Wednesday through 

Saturday evening. 

The upstairs bar is spacious, 

comfortable and offers 

an extensive wine and beer list. 

If you are planning a party, 
ask about our large banquet areas. 

Excellent food and friendly service. 

Give us a try! 

The patio is open for dining alfresco! 

Open for Lunch at 1 1 :30 Monday through Saturday 
Dinner served Monday through Sunday starting at 1 p.m. 

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Lunchi, Dinner & Private Parties 




Opera by Weisgall 
Is Next Offering 
At Opera Festival 

Opera Festival of New Jcr- 
[j scy present's Hugo Weisgall's 
Six Characters in Search of 
an Author on July 7, 12. 16, 
and 22. Performances will be 
held at McCartcr Theatre 
Center, Opera Festival's 
home since 1998. The pro- 
duction will be sung In 
English with English superti- 
tles projected above the 
stage. 

This thought-provoking 
piece is essentially an opera 
within an opera. A wayward 
family stumbles upon a 
rehearsal for an opera and 
requests that the director 
direct their story. As the 
opera progresses, we see how 
this surreal plot unfolds with 
the "Characters" telling their 
story and the 'Real People' 
dealing with the plot of it. 

Six Characters is Opera 
Festival's first of two modem 
operas being presented this 
season; the other is PriiKeton 
resident's Frank Lewin's 
Burning Bright. Six Charac- 
ters In Search of an Author 
is based on the play by Piran- 
dello which was named the 
best play of the 20th century 
by Time magazine. 

Conductor Barbara Day 
Turner and Stage Director 
Albert Takazauckas will bring 
the modem masterpiece to 
McCarter's stage. "We are 
very excited to bring this 
stunning masterpiece to life. 
The cast is headed by some 
of the most respected artists 
in the field with Rosalind 
Ellas and Robert Orth," said 
General Director Karen Tiller. 
The Coat 

The cast of the Opera Festi- 
val production Includes 
Rosalind Ellas (Mother) who 
returns to the Opera Festival 
after the 1997 production of 
Vanessa. Past engagements 
include La Fille du Regi- 
ment, Dialogues des Car- 
melites, Le Nozze di Figaro, 
Der Rosenkavelier, and An- 
drea Chenier at Metropolitan 
Opera and Hansel and Cre- 
te/ on PBS which earned her 
an Emmy Award. 

Robert Orth (Father) came 
to national attention with his 
acclaimed performances of 
Harvey Milk at Houston 
Grand Opera, San Francisco 
Opera, and New York City 
Opera. Other past engage- 
.ments include The Aspem 
jPapers at Washington 
[Opera.Six Characters in 
Search of an Aufl^pt^i Q^^",- 
-aufih Opera 'tH^ter.'^'anii' 



Candide at Austin Lyric 
Opera. 



Neal Harrelson Plrector) 
has performed in Eugene 
Onegin at Arizona Opera, 
L'Elisir d'Amore with Nash- 
ville Opera, La Boheme with 
the New York City Opera 
National Tour and Cosi fan 
tutti with Virginia Opera and 
Anchorage Opera. 

Michaela Gurevich (Step- 
daughter) returns to Opera 
Festival aher last season's 
Postcard From Morocco. 
Other past appearances 
iiKlude Otello and, Don Gio- 
uanni at Austin Lyric Opera 
and Minnesota Opera and 
Summer at Berkshire Opera. 



Good seats are still avail- 
able for all performances. 
Tickets range in price from 
$22 to $82 depending on 
seat location and perfor- 
mance date. For ticket infor- 
mation, call the McCarter 
Theatre Box Office at 609- 
258-ARTS (2787). 

Opera Festival of New Jer- 
sey features catered picnics 
under The Festival Tent on 
the lawn at Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary located at 
the corner of Alexander 
Street and College Road 
across from McCarter The- 
atre. Picnics must be ordered 
at least three days in advarKe 
from Richard's Market Cater- 
ing at 716-0069. Reserva- 
tions for picnic tables are rec- 
ommended at a cost of $10. 



"Wizard of Oz** k Next 
At Washington Crossing 

Playful Theatre's produc- 
tion of The Wizard of Oz 
will be performed at the 
Open Air Theatre at Wash- 
ington Crossing Park, begin- 
ning July 6. Performances, 
which begin at 8 p.m., will 
also take place July 7, 8, 12, 
13. 14 and 15. 

Dorothy will be played by 
Princeton resident Joanna 
Woodmff, whose father, Lou 
Woodruff, will conduct tfie 
15-piece orchestra. 



Other performers inchide 
Marty Berrien, Fred Gropper, 
Danny Giglio, Ketty Peace 
Getlik, Diane Wargo, 
PriiKeton resklent Kurt Pen- 
ney, Dawn Appelget and 
Vince Gagliano. 

Tickets are $7.50 on 
Wednesday, Thursday and 
Friday; $9 on Saturday. Chil- 
dren are half price. There are 
no reservations. To check on 
group rates, or for other 
information, call the box 
office at 737-1826. 



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609-921-6950 • 609-921-6959 

FAST FOOD & CATERING 

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Monday thn>ut>h Sunday 1 1 AM - 10 PM • Parkint; Ac-ro<>s Strrrt 



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Come in and sample 

Mediterra's 
Summer Menu 




[Executive CHiefl 
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A SAMPLING OF OUR NEW SUMMER MENU 



Gazpacho 

Caprese Salad with Yellow Beefsteak Tomatoes, 

Roasted Red Peppers and Fresh Mozzarella 

drizzled with Basil Oil 

Spinach Fettuccine Primavera with Grilled 
Chilean Seabass and a Beet Emulsion 

Grilled Vegetable Napoleon with Fried Pasta 

and Seasonal Vegetables topped with Smoked 

Mozzarella and an Asparagus Coulis 

Curry and Sesame Scented Yellowfin Tuna 
served rare over gazpacho 

Pan- Seared Grouper with Darjeeling Poached 

Forbidden Rice and Shiitake Mushrooms in a Shallot 

Saffron Broth "Burned" with Garlic Oil 

Chicken Roulade stuffed with Sopressata, Fontina 
and Scallions served with a Wild Mushroom Pan Jus 

Flank Steak marinated with Fresh Horseradish 

and Herbs drizzled with Au Jus and Garlic Spinach 

served over a Red Onion and Mushroom Confit 

Reservations are recommended. For our schedule 
of music and upcoming wine dinners, please call 

609-252-9680 

NEDITERRA 

Restaurant & Tapas Bar 

A T2 Venture 



29 Hultlsh St • Palmer Square 

r llliceiuii 




member Margie Thomas on 
the cello, and violist Dr. Alice 
Lindsay, an international 
soloist, former member of the 
New Jersey Symphony 
Orchestra and co-founder of 
the International FAME Music 
Festival. 

They will perform works 
from Bach, Mozart and Bizet. 

For ticket information, call 
the FAME office at 732- 
477-7772. 

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results 




the family tlieatre 



Mercer County 
Community College 

1200 Old Trenton Rd. 
West Windsor 

609-584-9444 



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Richardson AuDiroRiUM 

in Alexander Hall 



Princeton University 

Richardson 

Auditorium 

Box Office 

Tickets & Information 
(609) 258-5000 



CHAMBER MUSIC AT PRINCETON: The Osiris Piano Trio will perform, as part 
of the Princeton University Summer Concerts series, on Tuesday, July 11, in 
Richardson Auditorium. 



Osiris Ptano Trio 

To Perform on Campus 



perform at Barnes and Noble 
on Friday, July 7 at 8. 

On Thursday, July 6, at 8, 
The third in the series of Barnes and Noble will prc- 
frce chamber music evenings view the FAME Chamber 
presented by Princeton Uni- Music Quartet featuring vio- 
versity Summer Chamber 
Concerts will take place on 
Tuesday, July 11. The fea- 
tured performers will be the 
Osiris Piano Trio. 

The Osiris was formed as a 
result of a performance given 
by its members, three Dutch 
musicians, at the Amsterdam 
Concertgebouw recital hall In 
1988. The ensemble won the 
Philip Morris Rnest Selection 
In 1992 and the Annie Bos- 
boom Prize in 1997. 



iinist Mia Wu, a recording art- 
ist and faculty member at 
Barnard, Sherry Apgar of the 
Chamber Symphony of 
Princeton on the clarinet. 
New Jersey Pops Orchestra 



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Songs * Chants * Movement * Dance * Instrument Play 

Musk Classes for Newborn to Age 4 

SUMMER CLASSES 
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Information, Reservations 

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For Fall 2000 

(609)924-7801X17 

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West Windsor ♦ Plainsboro ♦ Cranbury ♦ East Brunswick 



The Osiris has performed 
throughout Europe and in 
Scandinavia, Estonia, and 
South Africa. The Trio made 
its American Debut at 
Carnegie Hall in 1997. The 
program will feature 
Beethoven's Trio In D major 
Op. 70 No. 1 Ghost; 
Norden's Bring in da fonk 
(1998) and Dvorak's Rano 
Trio Op. 90 Dumky. 

Other concerts in the 2000 
Princeton University Summer 
CoTKerts series feature the 
St. Petersburg String Quartet 
on Thursday, July 20, and 
the WfTiitman String Quartet 
on Tuesday, July 25. 

Princeton University Sum- 
mer Chamber Concerts take 
place at 8 in Richardson 

Auditorium. Free tickets (a 
maximum of four per person), 
required for admission, will 
be distributed on a first<ome, 
first-serve basis at the Rich- 
ardson Auditorium box office 
beginning at 6 p.m. on the 
night of the concert. 



Admission to the audito- 
rium begins at 7:30. Concert- 
goers are eiKouraged to pk- 
nic on the grass behind 
Alexander Hall before each 
cotKert. These concerts are 
supported by generous contri- 
butions from many Prirtceton 
area residents and local busi- 
nesses as well as grants from 
the Mercer County Cultural & 
Heritage Conunission, PNC 
Bank, MerriD Lynch, Presby- 
terian Homes at Meadow 
Lakes and SiemerK Corpo- 
rate Research, inc. 

For informatkxi i^ease call 
497-1642 . 



Jui,ChMri>er Music 
At Area Book Store 

Ja2z great Mondre Moffett, 
facuhy/arltot member o^ the 




14th ANNUAL 



(ON(M IN m (.m]m\) 

Thursday 6 to 8 p.m. 



Phoenix Rising 

Latin Jazz 
July 6 

Carnaby Street 

British Invasion 
July 13 

Weather permitting 

Sandy Maxwell Band 

July 20 

Monday Blues 

Big Band 
July 27 

First Class Act 

Oldies 
August 3 



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Music Performance Trust Funds & PNC Banl( 




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^^MSICREVJEW 

Meridian String Quartet's Free Concert 
Packed the House at Richardson Thursdav 

1^ or the past 32 years. Princeton Uni- drifting away to pizzicato nothinqness The 
r """^'X ^L^*^" P''^"''"9 " ^"^- f«"^ movement V// etalTr^Zd^ 

L T Ae tlTT" S!"" ''^'':!."^ ^"^^^' '' P'^^ '^Seiher wfth definE a^ 

some of the finest chamber ensembles exactness, which the players were able to 

around. Amazingly, the University has been do expertly 

able to keep these concerts free-of-chargc. o„ ^k • i . 

and Princeton audiences have shown their ^^^°''f'^ « 'ate, string quartets, those 

appreciation by packing Richardson Audito- ^"1^ }^^\ ^'* mammoth. 

rium for these events. Thursday night's con- ?," expanded the quartet format 

cert featured another stellar chamber 1°"" LT. ""o^^^nts to five, but more than 

ensemble: the Meridian String Quartet ^°<'"*0" o» another movement was the 

which has been performing togetfier for ter;""'*^"*/T""°?! of sections within 
years. a "a "^r lor len movements that add to the length of the 

Tw^ _ , .. *°'''* Constantly changing tempt and 

col^ff TnT?J "•^*^*«°"^'y '^^"^ «"d dynamics within movements make L and 
concise, and Thursday s concert featured other late works of Beethoven a supreme 
music celebrating the Romantic era. The chaUenge for performers. 
Quartet, including violinists Sebu Sirinlan 
and Lisa Tipton, violist Liuh-Wen Tmg, and One of Beethoven's Last 

^m^.^H in S^f J ?finn ^^°"§^ '""^^'^ interrupting his work on the quartet. 

Si irs^le th^tit ' 'h ^' TLf ''f ^^°^«" ^°*« his illness and rLverv 
5^ Romanti^et ^ ^'°"^ '" '"''' ^* composition in the form of the 

Au^ T "''^''3^' Dankgesang (Hymn of Thanksgiv- 

Although Puccini is better known for 'ng) which forms the central movement of 
operas than chamber music, his the work. The Meridian Quartet played this 
Crisantemi, composed in 1890. contains movement as a seamless hymn, for the 
much of the poignancy of Madama Butter- most part changing chords exactly in time, 
fl]/ or Turandot. The quartet moved effort- although occasionally one instrument was a 
less together through painstaking cadences bit ahead. The Molto Adagio section of this 
full of pathos. First violinist Mr. Sirinlan movement was especially exquisite 

^!LT^^ °[ ^* l"^'°^l! ^ ^^ °"*- ^^ '^«"dian capably handled the chang- 
movement work against the undulating ing tempt and dyna- mics of the work 

irff T'lLl.'^" r°"f ^°"" '1^ including'^ the fluid'and pianissimo opening 
^L T^n! K ^, "^ °' •""''" .°!1^ '""'^ ^'^a^'^ '^"'°^- Shades of traditional 18th 
swear one has heard in a melodramatic century string writing alternate with the 

depths of Beethoven s anguished pianlssi- 

Shades of Paris '"°*' ^"^ ^^ ^^'^^ between piano end forte 

T. ^ . were always well balanced. The Quartet 

he Quartet then moved to a work of succeeded in giving a different character to 
the same time period also with the each new key. The only weak part of the 
capability for visual depictions, but quartet was the fourth movement Alia Mar- 
with a very different flavor. Ravel's String da. which after the long controlled intensity 
Quartet in F Major, composed from 1902- of the Dankgesang section sounded a bit 
03 and his only work in this genre, contains raw. 
many musical shades of Paris at the turn of j|,„ Quartet 
the century. This work has the same flutter- however came 
ing undulations as the Puccini, with many ^a^jj tooether 
duet moments between the first vtolin and f„. , n«luho.i 
viola. Ms. Ting joined Mr. Sirinlan in these J,na, AJjeato 
duets with a very rich sound from the viola, appassionato. 
As with all the quartets performed this whk:h in style 




The next conceit In 
the Princeton Ihyvei^ 
sity Sununer Chamber 
Concert Series will be 
Tuesday, July 11, feat* 
turins the Osiris Piano 



fv» Mfiui Oil uic i|uaiit:ia ij«iiuriii«u uii» wnicn m siyie Trios. Free tickets are 
evening, no one player stood out as a solo- foreshadows available on the day of 
ist, but Mr. Sirinlan led the Quartet well on Beethoven's th« performance. 
this musical stroD through Paris. Ravel's Symphony No. —————— 

typical key changes and harmonies were 9. At one time these summer concerts were 
well handled, and although the music was presented outside, but the move inside to 
at times frenetic, the Quartet always found Richardson has enabled the series to brir»g 
resolution together. Phrases were held up in higher level ensembles. As free concerts, 
just k)ng enough, and especially in the case the price cannot be beat, and the commu- 
of the first movement Allegro Moderato, nity has long learned to take advantage of 
sections were ended with grace or by th«€ opportunities. ^Mancy Phun 







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PERFORMING FOR FAMILY, FRIENDS & FACULTY at Saturday morning gradu- 
ation ceremonies at the Princeton Nursery School are Emadiong Umoh and 
Jayda Milan Parker. 



iPnoio by cnmti PtKu) 



»» 



Nursery School Founder Margaret Flinsch 
Still Lauds 'The Life of the Imagination 

Margaret Matthews Flinsch, 92, help. They purchased the building at 78 

founder of the Princeton Nursery Leigh Avenue that still houses the nursery 

School on Leigh Avenue, returned school and sustained it through the first diffi- 

to help celebrate the school's 70th anniver- cult years of operation, 

saiv on June 23 and 24. A widow for many "| ^i^^y^ felt children were not understood 



years, she now lives in 
White Plains, N.Y., 
with a young house- 
keeper. The two 
motored down for the 
occasion. 

"My mother was a 
social service worker 
for the Borough," Ms. 
ininsch recalled in an 
Interview, "who was 
concerned about the 
children of working 
mothers. She looked 
at day nurseries in the 
area and was ap- 
pcilled." 

In 1929, Ms. Rinsch 
returned to Princeton 
from Vassar College, 
where she had studied 
psychology. Deter- 
mined to start a nurs- 
ery school, she and a 
friend, Kelly Prentiss. NURSERY SCHOOL DIRECTORS: 
opened with 40 chil- Jean Riley, left, director of the 
dren from Italian and Princeton Nursery School since 1973, 
black families. They with Margaret Matthews Flinsch, its 
accepted children as first director, who founded the 
young as 6 months. school in 1929. 

They 




solicited sup- 
port from a number of sources. "When i>eo- 
plc discovered the nursery school was inter- 
racial, most of them were shocked and 
withdrew their support," Ms. Flinsch recalls. 
Her father and mother — the Rt. Reverend 
Paul Matthews, Episcopal Bishop of New Jer- 
sey, and Elise Matthews — pitched in to 



by adults," Ms 
Flinsch stated, "and 
that the life of the 
imagination ought to 
be supported. We 
learn by being with 
children." 

To this day, she 
dislikes to use the 
word teach. "We 
operated on the basis 
of non-teaching, let- 
ting children make 
their own coordi- 
nated choices," she 
declared. 

"Some of us 
believe modem edu- 
cation is damaging to 
children." she contin- 
ued. "They are sub- 
jected to too much 
academic pressure. A 
number of parents 
recognize that, as 
well." 

Practices at the 
nursery school were 
— and are — based 
on Montessori princi 



pies and on the ideas of Harriet Johnson, 
founder of the Bank Street School in New 
York. 

Where the Princeton Nursery School once 
served 40 chiklren, there are now 50, rang- 
ing in age from 2 to 6. The school has also, 
recently, entered into an alliance with the 

Continued on Next Page 




HOLD ON TO YOUR HATS: Absnel Esteban clutches his mortarboard at Satur- 
day's graduation ceremonies for the Princeton Nursery School as Caitlin 
Orantas serenely Ignores hers. (Phoio»,amm,ptm) 



• Accounting/Tax Preparation 

AZER HOWARO !■ CO., CPA 

la^ specialibli (or acaaemcs, fwipiolil 

otgani/alions and individuals 

■157 Mo Hariison Piincelon 609921-8666 

OUR, ROtfRT H., CM Tax planning & 
uieparalion lot individuals cotpotalions. & 
liduciaries Compulen/efl accounling & 
review tor small businesses Ptepafation o( 
financial slaiemenis auditing booKkeepmg & 
payfoll irMxnpson Coufi )95 Nassau Slieel 
Prineel on 9216220 

• Air Conditioning; 

LAVmENCEVILLE FUEL Since 1926 

■I ... ii.f -. Lawrencevl 896-0141 

NASSAU OIL Sales & Service 

rtCX ' SljlP K.] PiiriLBlor. 9;'4 3530 

PRINCETON AIR CONDITIONINQ, 
INC. Since 1^70 Raplacemenl stteciaiibis 
f ret- eil 39 Evetell Dr Pfn Jcin 799 3434 

PRINCETON FUEL OH. CO. Since i942 
SA; Ai,;.,in1ei'jl Pin 924 1 100 

STEELECO, Inc. Auliiori/ed Carrief dir 
Healin g & A/C speciali sts 609-695-2673 

• Airport Transportation: 

A-1 LIMOUSINE SERVICE 24 m set 

.11.1- N > ti I ,•. ('..,1 iiru ,r, i.'4 0070 



• Bathrooms: 

QROVE PLUMRINO « HEATINO 

Kilclien f. Brfltiioom remodeling 55 N Mam 
Windsor 448 6083 

• Bathtub Resurfacing: 

•AVE YOUR TUB! Professional Resur 
lacing FiDerglas & Porcelain Done in your 
home Ins jred • Over 10 years 737-3822 



I Beauty Salons: 



• Alarm Security Systems: 

ALEN SECURrrV INC. Since 1970 

Burglar K 'ire <„s'Kint Access control CCTV 
24 Ir iTKXMlOdny 799 3883 

FEDERAL ALARM COMPANY 

We provide service & 24 hour monitoring on 
all maKes & models regardless of wtio 
inslaliert inpm fiQO ^p^ 3912 

• Appliance Repair: 

APPLIANCE TECH Ry Frank Lacato 

Since 1972 Dff:tb6b 326? 

FAIRHILLS APPLIANCE REPAIR 

C>serl lepairs on rr>a|Or appliances retrigera 
tors treezers disfiwashers an conditioners, 
wasnets dryers ranges Regular servce n 
Princeioii 609-393-3072 

• Auto Body Repair Shops: 

BODY SHOP By HarM WIW—i lor 

ill i;:i(i>ign & domestic cars Specializing in 
TitwiglabS UniOody repair a specialty Cor 
vette Route 206 Princin 921-8585 
MAOIC PmnN AUTO BOOV Princeton 

Pi>e i.a*rvl (lOmin liom Prn ) 393-5817 

RICOV AUTO BOOV 

Foreign & domesic 601 Rie 130. RobOms- 
villp (609) 585-4343 

• Auto Dealers: 

HAMILTON Chryalw-Ptvmewlh 

Autn Sales & Service 'Central Jersey s larg- 
est 1 240 Route 33 Hamilton Square 
586 201 1 (20 mm from Princeton) 

HOUM OF CARS, MC. T/A ECON- 
OMY MOTORS Cookstown-New Egypi Rd 
CooKslown (609)758 3377 

LAVniCNCE TOYOTA 683 4200 Free 
St i.iile service lo Princeton 

?6'" Rtp 1 ; ;;Aienceville 

MERCEDES-iMS Salat, Swvica A 

Laacins MILLENNIUM AUTOMOTIVE 
GHOlip 1250 Rl 22 East Bndgewaier 
308 685 080C 



LA JOLIE Full servce tiair styling 
Majsage Itierapy 4HulfistiSl Prn 924-1188 

• Building, Commercial: 

HARDEN CONSTRUCTION Otiice tit 
ups. renovations additions etc 609-452-9449 
or 9?1 3566 

a Building Contractors: 

BAXTER CONSTRUCTION Inc. Gen 

eial conliaclor;. specidlii'iiiQ n. additions, ren 
ovalioni lemudoling & ue* iKjmes Ai; 
phases of residential & liglil commercial con 
siruclion Pleasf? call 609-924-9263 

EDWARD BUCCI BUILDERS, bic. Cus 

torn home tjuiloiii i luiiOiMai n iht Princeton 
area to* over 40 yrs Additions & renovalKX^s 
Commercial/resioenlial 924 0908 
NICK MAURO A SON. hie. 924 2630 

Ne* tomes .idddions ler-ovalKXis, offices 

WNI. SIBASTUNO General building 
conlractor serving Mercer County for a quarter 
centwy Additions concrete tile Pincln JcIn 
799- 1782 (FAX 799-56441 

RAYHON WOOOWORKINO, Inc. 

Custom builder specializing m equality renova- 
tions millv»0(K & cabinels 609-259-7285 
JUUUS SESZTAK BUILDER 

Additions renovations restorations 
Relerences 609 466 073? 

W.R.H. DESION/BUILD, Inc. 

Ne* Conslruction Cor.sulling & Planning 
Additions & Renovations 609 730-0004 



• Auto Detailing: 



WAX ON WHEELS F..lenor'iri|er.o< cd' 
'.ire Haict Aas!^' A wa" TL>ijch liP service 
Biisioeb'. or tvjrne 609-276-9544 



• Auto Rentals: 

ECONO^AR Daily Meekly & monthly 
raif t All si/es o' cars ''lew & used cars Free 
customer picK up m Pm area 568 State Hd 
(Rt 206l Prn 924-4700 

HAMarON CHRYSLBR44.YM0UTH 

Renl/lease by day week rrvorth or year Insur- 
ance replacements Hie 33 Harmllon Sq (20 
mm from Prn) 586-201 1 



• Airto Repairs & Service: 

DARIO-S IMPORTED CAR SERVICE 

o,..t.-t.i.i. .'(i'lj III iniuo'itKJ car lepaifs 
299 Hillciest Av Ewing 396-5538 

FOWLER'S OULF Foreign & Oomeslic 
repairs VW Specialist NJ Insp Cir 271 Nas- 
sau 3t . Princeton 921 9707 

HAMILTON CHRYSLER#LYMOUTH 

Ct-ntr.ii Jerseys largest " 1240 Rie 33 
H,imiito(iSq (20tiiin Irom Prn ) 586-201 1 

LARINI'B SERVICE CENTER Road set 
vtce 24-hour lowing Princeton 272 Alex- 
ander Si, 924 8553 Kendall Park Ries 27 & 
518 (732)297 6262 

PAUL'S AUTO REPAIR Foreign & 
domestic & ligM truck repairs Flatbed towing 
N J Inspeclior Cir 691 Rie 130. Cranbury 
395-7711 & 443-4411 



Dining Out? 



Princeton & Near Vicinity: 



*** Ambassadors, Hotel prize 
winners, students & ordinary 

mortals share hearty moderately-priced 
tfH ..1 (ir.nk & hlg^ spirits Mon-Sal 11am lo 
1 am at THE ANNIX RESTAURANT 

Downstairs al 1261/2 Nassau Si opp Fire- 
suifie Litjr.iiy Princeton 609-921-7555 

*** From n/lst urnmi, CU- 
nese food comulnews commue to 

il.i. k r days a *eek lor Cantonese Hunan 
M inoarin & S?echuan entrees & delicacies to 
LITTLE SZBCHUAN RESTAURANT. 

BYOB Old Trenton Rd (1/? mile south of 
Priiirelon-Highlstown Rd Iralfic It) We'l Wind- 
sor 609 44.3 Vtn 

•*♦ Middle Eastern cuisine at 
Montgomery Shop. Ctr. Feiatei hi^m 

" 'I', siv,' .|.|„,t :„iKl,iv,w S more pleas- 
di.iiy M:vvii a: SAHARA RESTAURANT 
U S 206 at Monlgomery Theatre BYO Take- 
out 609 921 8336 

*•* Sushi Plus a wide-ranging 
Asian Memii\ soonja's cafe wnere 

authentic Kofean & Japanese dishes are gra 
cirxisly served lor lunch & dinner Open 7 
days a week at 244 Alexander Street |ust 
above the Faculty Rd iraftic lighi Convenient 
to both McCarlet Theatre and the University 
(Where Andy s Tavern was once a Princeton 
LandrtiacKJ 824-921^. 



CONSUMER 

BUREAU: 

How it works: 

I No Butineas Finn Pans A Fee 
Of Am Kind in order to get on or 
Slay on Consumer Bureaus complete 
unpublished Register of Recommended 
Bus.fiess People (whch can be checked 
tree of charge by calling 6O9-9240737) 

2 In Order To Be and Remain 
On Consumer Bureau's Reg- 
i ster Of Recommended Bus 



messes, each recommerxjed business 
firm musi resolve to ttie satistaclion of 
(^nsunrif ' Bureau's all-consumer Volun- 
teer Pare each and every customer 
complaint of theirs (if any) known or 
reported to Consumer Bureau. 

3 ONLY Busi n ess firms In 
G ood Sfomlififl on the Bureau's 
Ftecommended Register are allowed to 
advertise m these Consumer Bureau 
Town Topes classified columns (while 
shanng with other Consumer Bureau 
Recommended business firms the cost 
ol such advertising) 

► FOR FRE E INFORMATION OR 
ASSISTANCE w ith any business firm 
located within 25 miles of Princeton call 

609-924-0737 



CONSUMER 
BUREAU 



PO' 



Since 1967 1 52 Alexander SHeel 
P Box 443. Princeton. NJ 08540 



• Building Materials (See Lumber): 

heath lumber CO. oiice ■,ob7 

Home buiWing ctr 1580 N Olden Av Ewing 
Prompt deliver y 1 -800-8SHEATH(43284) 

• Carpentry: 

KEN SCHEETZ All types o( carpentry & 
home improvements No |0b too small Over 
24 yis exp I amoertville 397-0938 

DAVID SMITH Built m cabmelry Book- 
cases wainscoting crown moldings chair 
rails & home offices 609-497 39 1 ' 

TWOMKY BUILDERS « CARPENTRY 
OCTAItS Aliefations balhrooms kitchens 
decks basenients srnalljohs loo 466-2693 

• Carpet & Upholstery Cleaners: 

CARPET TECH Cleaning A Restora- 
tion Specialists rcrj in \'tC)t] 

WORTHBUY CARPET A POWER 
CLEANERS ■32-961-0600 



• Carpet &Ri| Shops: 

C. FRIED Kaiastan Bigelow Lee 
Mol d*k Major Drands al discount Vmyl floor- 
I'-.g Mor Igomery Ctr Rocky Hill 683-9333 

LOTH Plows A C sW w Since 1939 
Brand name carpet & tlooimg Karastan Big 
Blow Lee Vinyl, tile, ceramics, hardwood 
208 Sanhican Dt Trenton 393 920 1 

REGENT FLOOR COVERING, INC. 
Since 1963 Visit our showroom Complete 
selection ol wall lo waH carpels & area rugs 
7Rle3:N PonnirrjUif 73,' .■'466 

• Chimney Cleaning/Repair! 

E A E CHIMNEY SWEEPS /er 10 yrs 

ol chimney m-,!,, ,■ , ■ ,i cleaning 

Visual and/or cairii.-id e.auianon Masonry 
repairs Tullyiown Pa 215-945-2200 



> Cleaning; Dry: 



LUXE FRENCH DRY CLEANERS Dry 

ciBdiiing laundry, pick-up & delivery at both 
hornet of fice 9210693 4 799 0716 

• Computer lntemetTervJc«K 

NEW JERSEY INTERNET m. I 6800 
Guaranteed Best Choice tor Internet Access - 
Free startup software Free knowledgeable 
and courteous telephone suppofl Flat '19 95 
monthly rale www NJI co m Established 1990 

• Computer Repair & Service: 

PRINCETON COMPUTER SUPPORT, 

hie Repairs/upgrades notebooks mullime- 
dia monilofs printers CD-ROMS Pentiums 
sound card/speakers hard disks tape back- 
ups Rocky Hill 921-8889 



• Driving Schools: 

WINOBORO DRIVING SCHOOL Cu; 

lege educated inslruclws Pnncipdi nslruclor 
Meivin L Jones M Ed lurmer drivers' ed 
teacher al Princeton High Schoo l 275-1990 

• Electrical Contractors: 

JOHN CIFELLI [leclncui Cuniracloi 
Installations, repairs Residenlial/comrcl Lie 
•4131 Insured/bonded 921 3238 

NASSAU ELECTRIC Installation & 
repairs Residential & comrrvercial service 
Upgrading Trouble shooting Outlets 
installed Fully insured licensed & bonded 
Free Fstinates 924 8823 

JOHN PROCACCINO ELECTRIC 28 

yrs exp Quality ie(.ii:t! Resi(tei>ii.ji Corn 
mercial Design & ouild Lie » 12800 
Insured/bonded 921-3306 

• Fencing: 

AHordable Fane* by SUBURBAN 
FENCE 2r(l .\ 3id yeneiation lairnly bin, 
nes:, 100 s ol styles V.sil ni,r Ijrgfjsi 
in-lhe-area fence display |usi oH u S 1 near 
Bruns wick C ircle 452-2630 or 695 3000 

• Fitness Training: 

THE PRINCETON BODYSMITH 

Indlvlduall/Ml l',iii,r'i; ;:i,.jrj|7r, 
AFAA ceililiL-: « :• ■: ■ ' '.ir 

• Floor Covering Contractors: 

REOENT FLOOR COVERING, INC. 

Since '%;i Vi^i! oui stiOAroon.s Cijmn cfna' 

6 residential carpels vinyl wood & ceramc 

7 Rie 31 N Pen nington 737-2466 " 

• Floor Refinishing/lnstallations: 

APPLIED WOOD PRODUCTS, INC. 

Insured Freeesi 1 ft(X) '.)1 'Ihi)} 

FLAWLESS HARDWOOD FLOORS 

Sanding, refmishing & installations Di.iSt con 
trol Systems 3fd generalKjn 1 888 '47 2284 

JIM MeCOMHICK FLOORING. HtC. 

Serving Prn since 1948 908 454-3812 
609279-6868 

• Florists: 

HAOERTY THE FLORIST Flower & gar 

den ar 79 S Maiiv Ciai . ..., 395 0660 

PERNA'S PLANT A FLOWER SHOP 

Operi 7 days Local delivery & towers by wiie 
189 Wash Rd Pnncelon 452 1383 

• Fuel Oil & Oil Burners: 

LAWRENCEVILLE FUEL Smce \'*fi 
Fuel oil plumbing hing it cond & energy 
audits 16 Gordon Av Lwrncvl 8960141 

NASSAU OIL 24-hr "State ol the Art- 
equipment sales & service 800 Stale Rd Pm 
924-3530 

PRINCETON FUEL OIL CO. Since 1942 

Sale-j inslailalion & setji e ol qjalily 
iiealiiiii. iir conditioning CARRIER dealer 

.'VO Aif-..-,i .le-Sl Pm 9/4-1100 

• Furniture Dealers: 

WHITE LOTUS FUTON OC' 

n.i'ijrnadf IcIOTi mattresses Oa- i. •■ 
.r.ef'v beds Convertible couche iires 1 
-I'l.'Sbei-. Hd'acrafteO missic 'i/e 

C-«quisite(arjiiCi Piltows Cuslon. *,i- 
202 Nassau St Princeton 609 49' ijt» 

• Furniture Unpainted: 

ERNEV'S UNFINISHED FURNITURE 

One ol Itie largest selections ui ./ 
niture m Islew Jersey "From Coi,' 
temporary ' 2807 Rie 1 Aiie: i l 
Lawrenceviile 530CI097 ^^^ 

• Garage Doors: 

MILLER OARAGE DOORS Resideniia 
garage doors lepaired/repiacfi i lallea 
Radio controls Automatic door op<:-'!.-<s Fu'ly 
insured Free eslimates Owner operate J 
W Win dsor Twp 800-799-2193 

• Garden Centers: 

MAZUR NURSERY A FLOWER SHOP 

..'f/, fl.ikei ', B3'>.'^ Rl) Latv: 18^ <'■ 

OBAL GARDEN MARKET INC. v-^' 
thing lor tlie garden Annuals d^'--' 
shrubs, trees, seed & fertiii/er Mf.-.-^' S'- 
Road al the Canal. Princeton. 452 2401 

• Glass: Residential/Commercial: 

NELSON GLASS A ALUMINUM JdU 

Wa 4b bpnng. Pnnceior. 924-aM: 

• Gutter Clemliig ft Repair 

QUTTERMAN! GUTTER CLEANING (re 
nioves debus by hand, then HYDROFLUSHfS 
them cleani| Gutter repair/replacemen 
Seamless Shdil (GUI. d 92 1 2299 

• Hardware Stores: 

WILLIAM H. LABAW HARDWARE 

f(i}3dinq Blvd Belte Mead 908-359 1.- <■ 

• Hearing Aids: 

ERNrS HEARING AW CENTER 

Since 1947 Senior cili/er discount ' 
2907 Rt 1 Lawrenceviile 609-882-4200 

• Heating Contractors: 

LAWRENCEVILLE FUEL Since 1925 
16 Gorito*. Av Lav.ienctmilla. 896-0141 

NASSAU OIL 24-hr 'State of the Art 
equipment Sales & Service 
800 Slate Rd Prn 924 3530 

PRINCETON FUEL OIL CO. Since 
1942 Installation & service ol quality heating 
& air condtg equip CARFIIFR dealer 
220 Alexander St Prn 924 1100 

• Historical Restoratiofls: 

FLESCH'S ROOFING Fof all rootir^g & 
guller Aor» Sttecidiiimy m historical restoia 
tion Built in Yankee gutters, cornice 4 slalH 
work 609394 2427 

R.J.W. BUILDERS General contracloi 
15 yrs e«ri Sor^ciali^'ing m cornice repair & 
rebuilding Hisloncal molding latxicalion Mill 
work 609-882<511 

• Home Improvement & Repair: 

AMOROSO BUILDERS An phases n! 

new const . remodehng & repair work Rea 
sonable rales 609 658 249 
M.A.K. CONSTRUCTION 

Improvements & remodeling 
Siding & roofing 800 821 3288 



(continued m next cokimnl 




• Home Improvement & Repair, ico, 1 1 

SOUDERS, RAYMOND L., Jr.. Inc. 

Over 25 years exiwrirncc b% 1 156 

TWOMEY BUILDERS A CARPENTRY 
DETAILS Alloralioiis. bjltirooms kiicl^ens 
decks: basements. smaH )o0s too 4 66 2693 

# Heme inspection Service: 



AMBIC BLOO. INSPECTIONS. Stale 

licensed ASrII S, BOCA Ceil.liud Member 
"Complete inspection services will save you 
lime & money with one phone call ' 
1-888-262-6242 



I House Cleaning: 



AMERICANA MAID SERVICE 'Excel- 
lence 111 fn.«ne iiedi^iiiy befviitg Prn area lor 
16 yrs Free phone estimates 921-1663 

FUTURE BEST Home MirintoiiMie* 

WKIy Oi-v. .:■ Pie & post moving 

Carpels I .'. J .-.s Insured 890-8165 

• insurance: 

ALLEN * STULTS CO. Smce 1681 
Propeny casualty lile group 
100 tto Mam Si Highisiown 448-0110 

mmlean agency 

3rd fkxx 138 Nassau Street. Prn 683-9300 

PRUOCNTIAL INSURANCC 

Oowniown Pnncelon 683-9300 



• Mason Contractors: 

ANDREOLI CONSTRUCTION CO. 

SinevsalKs siups pahos & kiundalions Quarry 
& ceramic tile 406 6565 

DESANTIS A MAMMANO Masonry Res- 
loiation Brich & stone poinling 394-7240 

FAH MASONRY Bricx. bkxk & concrete 
work lnlerioi/e«lefior ceramic & marble work 
Landscape design 732-448-0900 

• Medical Equipment: 

HOMECARE AMERICA Nassau Park 

Slir.i.iii J r Hii,-i Ml • S 609-419-1900 

• Mortgages: 

SOVEREIQN BANK 

18fc .1 II. ,■ Pin 609-279-6022 
and 1-800-275-8711 



• Moving & Storage: 



• Interior Desigii: 



JOY ANDERSON INTERIOR DESIGN 
LTD. Highly pof;,o(iali^ed service lor all o( 
your lurnishing & decorative needs Free con- 
sultation 609-466-0881 



"Terror -tree decorating 
lor the budget conxxxis " 609-734-0141 

• Jewelers: 



Gemologisls 
& tamity jewelers lor more than a hall century 
Penmnglon Shop Ctr 737-3775 
Ewing 962 Parkway Av 882-08X 

PfNARDI JEWELERS Diamond special- 
ists Repair service 1270 S Olden Av Hanml- 
lonTw p 585-7495 

• Kennels: 



ANCHOR MOVING A STORAGE 

MaytiuAc-r aytifiL i\iaii>y oAned & operated 
tor Z^ years Ptincelor 921 3223 

BOMmrS Meiring A Sleri««. Local & 
long distance nrxwing & storage A lull service 
WORLDWIDE relocation company Uniled Van 
LmesAi/ih Agi Pm 452 2200 

PRINCETON VAN SERVICE The Mov- 
Int Eapcfts Full service moving, packing & 
storage Antiques, artwork & pianos Free 
price quotes 609-497 9600 WeOsile 
www princelonmoving com 

• Mufflers: 

JOSEPH J. HEMES A SONS, Inc. 

Mulliers lor loreign & domestic cars 100% 
guarantee, 1233 HI 206 N. Prn 924-4177 

• Painting S Decorating: 

DOUO SACKES Inlerior/ekterior pamling 
Historical restorations Plaster repairs & sheet 
rocking Popcorn ceilings Power washing 
17 yrs exp 908-904-4418 

JUUUS H. GROSS INC. Serving the 
Princeton community since 1959 Prolessonal 
inierior & exterior painimg & paperhanging 
Power washing (jwnei operated & site super- 
vised Free estimates Prompt service 924- 
1474 



FLESCH'S ROOFINO For all rooting & 
gutlerwork Buill in Yankee gutters cornice & 
stale work 609 394 242'' 

R.A. McCORMACK CO. Since 1970 
All types fooling Fully insured 737 6663 

BRUCE RICHARDS Home Improve. 
NMils, Inc. Rooling & siding specialists 
since 1972 Mercerville 609 890-0542 

THERIAULT ROOFING Repairs all 
types ol new roofs gulteis Siony B'ook Rd 
Hopewell (609) 4r,i ■:;fi4'. 



Professional nlenor & exterior pamiing Owner 
Operated Free Est Ret s 609 584 8808 



BED A BISCUIT INN Dog & cat board 
ng & grooming Oversized mdoor/outdoor Plintinfl t PiPOr HanOinO: 
runs Exercise paddocks Open 7 days • -r a a 

65 River Rd. Belle Mead 908-874-7748 



• Kitchen Cai>inets: 

FLEETWOOD KfTCHENS A BATHS 

107 Sherman Ave Ranlan 906-722-0126 

• Landscaping Contractors: 

DOERLER LANDSCAPES, Inc. 

Estab 1962. Certilied landscape architects & 
contractors Sleven J Doerler N J C L A 
SAS00629 Lawrenceviile 609-896-3300 

STEVEN N. HARHIOH, Sr. A Sons 
L«ild sB «p> DositiMrs Full landscape 
design work & installation Lawn mamienance 
& tree removal 448-0229 

JOHN KOCmS LANDSCAPHM 

Specializing m oIuk stone & brick walks & 
patios Foundation landscaping Sprinkler sys- 
tems Fully insured 737 3478 

CHARUE WAGNER Lawn S GarriMi 
Sarvice Landscaping Mulchmg Spnng 
itrt-' p Grass cuHing. 609-393-5042 

• Laundries: 

LAUNDROMAT OF PRINCETON Wash 
dry & loiii o' sen service Large capacity 
washers Oper 7 days 6 10 1 1 Stalled M-F 
8-8 Sat/Sun 8-5 Ptr. Shop Ctr 924 3304 

• Lawn Maintenance: 

BUONO LANDSCAPING, Inc. 

Complele lawri & garden maintenance 
Brick & blueslone walks 466-2205 

RAFFAtLI CARNEVAU 

Mowmg Clean ups Pruning Reseeding 
Fertilizing Weed control Planting 
Flowerbeds 924-3032 

LAWN DOCTOR of PRINCETON- 
PENNINGTON-HOPEWELL Complele 
lawn iBrtilizaliai services, including 'Nalural 
Program ' N J D E P Cert applicators Serv 
entire Prn regon Freeesi 609 737-8181 

PRINCETON PROPERTY MAINTE> 
NANCE Mowing & maintenance 921 -91 16 

LARRY Q. SCANNELLA Landscaping & 
gardening Complete lawn maintenance 
including mowmg & organic lertilization D E P 
certified Mulching & pruning Palios Walks 
Oramage work ^k hoe Top soil Insured 
Free estimates 924-2666 

• Lawn Mowers, Garden & Farm 
Equip. Sales & Service: 

JOSEPH J. HEMES SONS, Inc. Auth 
Sales A Service Simpiiciiy lora Bob Cat, 
While Homeliie. Green Machine, Anens 
1233 US 206 al 518 Prn 924-4177 



H. 924-1474 
Painimg paper hanging & decoralirig by 
Pnncelon owner smce 1969 



I Paving Contractors: 



CROSS COUNTY PA VINO, hw. Drive 

ways i pji* i' g I .'' ' '2 jj'j 3025 

FEUX V. PIRONE A SON PAVING A 

LANDSCAPE CO>A.^phall New & resurlac 
ing Crushed stone Tar & chips Seal coating 
Drainage grading & excavating Railroad ties 
Belgian block Princeton 924-1735 

STANLEY PAVINO Smce 1953 Blacktop 
driveways & parking lois Fiee eslmnales Mas- 
lerCard & Visa accepted 609 386 3772 

• Pest Control: 

COOPER Pf ST CONTROL Graduate 

enlomotogtsts Locally owned & operated 
smce 1955 Fully ms Freeesi 799-1300 



• Pharmacies: 

FORER PHARMACY Renao equip 
Prescriptions surycals, sick room supplies 
160Wimf!rsp.«n, Pnncelon 921-7287 



• Photo Finishing: 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY STORE 

Custom Kodak S discount prij.;essir g 
36 University PI Pm 9 2 1 8500 

• Plumbing & Drain Cleaning: 

JIM*S DRAIN CLEANING Any type of 

drair [iciDlem 7 days a Mr. 921-0202 



• Plumbing & Heating: 

HJ. GHOVE PLUMBING A HEATINO 

Fteprs & alterations Kii, un 

remodeling Lie No 489 No .U!4 4 No 
08442 55 N Main Windsor 448-6083 

UWRENCSVILLI FUEL Since 1925 
Repairs rerrxxleling & mstaHaiions Hot water 
healers N J Lie »3533 16 Gordon Av 
Lawrenceviile 896 014' 

MICNACL J. MESSKK Plumbing A 
Hstlnt, Inc. Lie *8063 All pluniOiny & 
heeling serv 24-hi insured 924-0502 

SANNINO'S Since 1945 
16 Oakland Rd Princeton (609)924-1878 

TRHMLE PLUMMNG A HEATING 

24-hour emergency service New inslaiialions 
& repairs NJ Slate license «75I3 924-8911 

• Printers: 

LDH PlliNTING UnlW Complele Printing 
Service Offset & Color Typesetting Binding 
Fast service Rubber stamps Notary .sennce 
1101 Hi 206 Bidg B Prn 924-4664 

S A A OUPUCATINQ NIC High-speed 
duplicaling Spirals Therma Binding Blue- 
printing 5 Independence Way olt FJoule 1 
Princeton 924-7136 



• Ligirting Fixtures: 

THE UGHT GALLERY Since 1968 
Lighting consullalion & design world class 
selection of fixtures and shades Open 6 days PURIPS & Woll DriiiinQi 

Princeton Shopping Cir . North Harrison St . ~ 

Pnncelon 609-924*876 



• Ugbtning Protection: 



SAMUEL STOTHOFF CO. INC. Since 

1886 Pump mstalialion & service on all 
makes Water treatment Well drilling Rl 31 
Flemmgton 906-782-2116 



ZEUS LIOHTNINO RODS since 1967 
UL LPl NFPA certilied systems Surge pro- 9 RaillngS: trOR WOTIC 
teclKXi for coTDpulers sleieos. TV & other 
electronic gear Free est (local call) 609- 
466-0646 



9 Lifflonsine Seivlce! 

A-l LIMOUSINE Since 1970 All airports 
ISO vehicles with stereo & aii cond 24 hrs a 
day Car ohrxies 924-0070 

PRINCETON GRAVTOP LIMOUSINE 

24-hf door-lo-door service by appT Sedans 
limous in es, vans & m im-txise s 921-1 122 

• Lingerie; Foundations: 

EDITHS LINGERIE Fine linoerie Bras- 
sieres sizes 32 to 46 Mastectomy fitlmgs 
1 70 Nassau St . Princeton . 92 1 -6059 

• Lnnber Yards (See Bidg. Mat'ls): 

COLEMAN'S HAMILTON SUPPLY Co. 

Lumtjei deck inalenais inuidings windows 
doors custom millwork. cabinetry & hard 
woods Showroom 65 KkKkner Ave Hamil 
Ion Twp 609-587 4020 



DINGER BROS. IRON WORKS Estab 
1928 Intb'ior & eitlerior rail rgs lences & 
gales window guards spiral stairs Repairs 
Fully insured Free estimates 609 396- 1 554 



• Real Estate: 

PRUDENTIAL PIONEER REAL 
ESTATE 'Helping people Imd homes since 
19fa5 !38 Nassau St Pm 609 430- 1?88 

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE Raatters. 

Since 1974 MLS Sales tenials 

32 Chambers Si. Prmceion 924 1416 

• Records, CDs & Cassettes: 

PRINCETON RECORD EXCHANGE 

CDs & LPs Ne* & used Bought & Sold 
Rock, classical lazz oldies Open 7 days 
20 Tulane SI Pnncelon 921-0881 
www piex com 

• Recreational Vehicles: 

KADCO CAMPING CTR. New & used 
campers/trailers Supplies Hitches Financing 
Rentals 1214 Rt 130 Robbmsville 443-1133 



• Septic Systems: 

BROWN, A.C. Sewer & drain cleaning 
Hew seplic syslems inslalled Cesspools 
cleaned & inslalled Excavating Trenching 
Donl Cuss, Call Gus' " 
Lawrenceviile 882-7888 & 799-0260 



• Siding Centraetors: 

LESTER JAMCZUK Roofing & sidmg 

3fivP.iis i-.neiience t.09-393-4743 
LAWRENCEVIUE HOME IMPROVE 

MENT CTR. Since 1952 Vinyl sidirig/cuslom 
trim Fifci- ..•,; 1 ,i*'t!nceville 882 67097 

HJLK. CONSTRUCTION Siding rooling 

& remodeling 800-821-3288 



• Slipcovers: 

MIRANDA SHORT Slipcovers curtains 
cushions & home tumishings 921-1906 



• Snow RenHwal: 

LAWN A TREE CARE OF PRINCE- 
TON, Inc. VA 4"',' 



• Stereo & Video Repair: 

ELECTRONIC SERVICE LAB 

Guaranieud v.iii- , ,, ^ ,-. 'vCRs. stere 
OS TVs & camcorders Open 6 days at 140 
Scolch Rd Ewing 609-883-7555 



• Stone, Natural: 

TRENTON STONE A MARBU CO, 

Stone quarry operators since 1870 M.jibie 
slate, granile, lirrieslone. bluestone & more 
Wilburtha Road, W Trenton 882 2449 



• Surgical Supplies: 

AMBEST ■,_■'! (iii-w I ospital/surgical sup- 
pl & equip Medicaid/Medcare consultants 
1600 N Olden Av Ewmg 882 3702 

FONIR P H A RM ACY Sales & rentals ot 
ostomy & hospital supplies & equip 2 blocks 
Irom Princeton Hospital 160 Wilheispoon. Prn 
921 7287 



• Swimming Pools ft Spas: 

SYLVAN POOLS .-^'.v '.^-Jn Alloroabie 
ir -Qiouiid pools ri concrete Pool Supplies 
Montgomery Center Rte5t8 4 206, 
Rocky Hill 921-6166 



• Tile, Ceranie: 

REGENT FLOOR COVERING, INC. 

Slice '9b3 Visit our showroom Unsurpassed 
quality mslalling ceramic, marble slate terra 
colta Complele selection ol American Olean 

6 olher tiles Irom around the wortd 

7 Rie 31 N Pennington 737-2466 



• Tile, Ceramic Contractors: 

FOX TILE WORKS Ceiam.c iiie & marble 
installations 908-526-7383 

ROMAR S KOMAR (kxal call) 359 3650 
Foreign & domestic tloor & wan tile inslalled 
669 E Main Bridqewaier 732-356-9110 



Transmissions: 



LEE MYLES 



■ & tree lowing 
^0300 



Travel Agencies: 



AMERICAN EXPRESS TRAVEL 

AGENCY 10 Nasr.3i, Si Pi.rceM W -if.Of. 

KULLER TRAVEL CO. Owner operated 
since 1947 Complete travel arrangemenis 
108 Nassau Street Princeton 924-2550 



• Tree Service: 



CHARUEY TREE SERVICE, L.L.C. 

Tree & sIioto removal Pruning Gutter clean 
ing 24-hour emergency storm service 
609-7719660 



LAWN A TREE CARE OF 
TON, Inc. Quality service Plan health care 
Spraying fertilization pruning, slump removal 
& landscaping Fteferences 924-4777 



• Upholstery: 



FURNITURE RESTORATION CEN- 
TER Furniture re upholstering relinishing, 
repairs caning, rushing E'Windsor 443-1774 



• Veterinarian Hospitals: 

COLUMBUS CENTRAL VETERINARY 
HOSPITAL A EMERGENCY CLINIC 

Open 24 iiouis a day. 7 day; a week. 365 
days a year Emergency service US Rie 
206 ColumOus (25 mm Irom Pnncelon via 
I 2964 US 206) 609-298-4600 



• WitirOMMi/RestonrtiM: 

(See Carpel 4 Upholstery Cleaners) 

• Waterproofing Contractors: 

ANDREOLI CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Basement walerprooling Interior French 
drains Exterior grading Lifetime warranty 
466-6565 

A STA DRY BASEMENT WATER- 
PROOFING CO. Free inspection, analysis 
aid eslimates Expert m all types of water 
proofing Sensible pricing Lilelime guarantee 
Job relererces m your area 609 392-6700 



• Windows: 

LAWRENCEVILLE HOME IMPROVE- 
MENT CTR. All types ol windows since 
1952 f ree eslirriales 609-882-6709 

RJLMcCORMACK CO. Smce 1970 
All styles & maioi biands 737-6563 



COOL BREEZE FOR A GRAD: Javon Pannell, left, fans Mashley Romain atS 
graduation ceremonies on Saturday for the Princeton Nursery School. 

iPhoto by Clmlei PIKUI 



Princeton Nursery School 

ConttHLied from Precedino Page 

Princeton Regional Schools and the YWCA 
Nursery School, in which the three institu- 
tions will share expertise. 

"We are always looking to ui^grade," says 
Gabriel Lependorf, chairman of the nursery 
school's board of trustees, "and to improve 
our offerings in music, art, and 'games 
learning.'" 

Tuition at the Princeton Nursery School is 
based on annual income and family size. The 
program is subsidized l)y the state Depart- 
ment of Youth and Family Services (DYFS), 
which pays a portion of tuition for more than 
half the children. "The average tuition is 
about $500 monthly," according to Director 
Jean Riley. 

The student body last year was 40 percent 



African American, and 40 percent Latino, 
Mr. Lependorf said. The curriculum — when 
a child is ready — includes computer skills, 
pre-schooi reading, scieiKe, math, Spanish, 
French, art, music, and field trips. 

In 1987, Ms. Flinsch founded the Blue 
Rock School in Palisades, N.Y., an alterna- 
tive school for children In grades K-6. 
According to the school's brochure, "We 
believe that the essential ingredient of the 
learning process is an active attention.'" 

"When the child is wtiolly engaged," 
brochure writer continues, "his work has 
quality of being 'his own.'" 

It also notes, of Ms. Flinsch, "Her lifelong 
exploration of the educational process, her 
insight, and her experience have led many 
others to re-examine the role of the teacher 
and to redefine education." 

IQvera 



the 
.. a 




SAYINQ GOODBYE IS HARD TO DO: Rhayna Mays and Nagia Shuaib are 
heartbroken over losing their older friends to graduation. They dissolved in 
tears at the Princeton Nursery School graduation ceremony on Saturday 
morning. ^^^^ ^ ^^ ^^^ 




MOVING ON TIME: Asia Robertson, Stephanie Cardona and Lucas Lopei 
celebrate their graduation from Princeton Nursery School on Saturday 
morning. 



(PMo bf aula PlHU) 



la 



Museum Quality 
Framing 

Over 2000 frames 
or) display 

Original Fine Art 

Painting. Sculpture, 
Limited Edition Prints 



Princeton Meadows 

Shopping Center, 

Plainstwro Road, 

PlalnstX)ro 

(609) 799-6706 



Micawber Books 

new. used and rare 

110-114 Nassau Street 

Princeton, New Jersey 

(609)921-8454 

Mon-Sat9-10; Sun 11-5 



BOwhe&PCare 



UNiyUK GIKrS. FURNISHINGS 
&. ACCtSSORIliS f-ROM 
/"ROUND TUF WORLD 

vww.bowheandpeare.com 

27 Palmer Square 
Princeton. NJ 08540 

tel: 609.924.2086 
/a.x: 609.924.4508 



I 'll 1 1 1 r I rrfrWTTn I ] ii i i iT pTrriT i 1 1 '-r 



La Plume et Papier 

FORt^ERLV 80XW0RKS 

Specializing in Invitations 

Weddings • Rehearsal Dinners 

Engagement Parties 

Visit us at our neiv location 
41 P^ilmiT Square Wost • Princolon • 6nq4'J7.n2.T 






Westminster Performs^ 



^ Recitals • Voice • Piano • Organ • 
^ti^^ J Choral • Chamber Music • Opera • 
— M... Children's Concerts • And Much More 



24-hour concert information: 609-2 1 9-200 1 



W EST.MINSTER CHOIR COLLKiiK 

OF RIDKR rM\KRsrr> 



I ^^ --^^ _ 101 \Xalnut Lane, Print tton, NJ 085-40 3899 




IJJUUUUUULIUI. 



ine Alt Kcsloration 

SiKi'iu.N P. VVkston 

Artist, Restorer of Oj! Paintings 

and Fine Porcelain 




ensons 



WH HiKgin* Avr . Bridle. N| 0>710 



C*ll for Appl. 



# 





Craig Ponzio 

SIGNATUnC FRAMC COLLKCTION 



LARSON ♦ JUHL 

CUSTOM rmmm* thk bcautt op tour homi 
rOR THE FINEST CUSTOM FRAMES 




All. W. I of Dorroli Lone in Lawrencevitle, NJ 
2 mile* louHi of Quoker Bridge Moll 



M-f' 8am-9pm 

SAI: 9om-8pni 

SUN: Noon-5pm 





?1^1i SHOP THE WORLD 



at the 

The Salty Do g 

4 Spnng St., Princeton • Closed Tuesdays • 924-0455 



Art Restoration 

Oil Paintings 
Gold Leafing of Frames 



Lawrence 

A«r/. f«AMt Cjallery 

Lawrence Center. Lawrencevllle 
883-2401 

Wed Fn 10-6, Tubs & Thurs 10-8 Sal 10-5 



The Williams Gallery 

enhance your environmenl ihroughfme art 

PAINTING • PRINTS • SCULPTURE 
FINE ART FRAMING 

Ei^hi Chambers Street » Princeton « 609-921-1 142 




C G GALLERY, LTD 
i) & Framing Studio ■ 

^ QUALITY AND EXCELLENCE 
s,nc» 1985 IN FINE ART AND FRAMING 



10 Chambers St. • Princeton • 609-683-1988 



|[JghC tyC ANTIQUE PRINTS 

/- >tCA>i» at 




The Hopewell Frame Shop 




OIL ON CANVAS: This painting, "Christina with 
Flowers," is one of the works by Leila Bakashvili 
that will be on exhibit at the Lambertville Public 
Library, 6 Lilly street, Lambertville, through August 
12. 



"Color and Light," an exhi- 
bition of original watercolors 
by Beth Kantor, will be at the 
Montgomery Cultural 
Center Main Gallery. 
124 Montgomery Road, 
Skillman, through July 28. A 
reception will take place at 
the gallery on July 16, from 1 
to 4. Landscape themes dom- 
inate the exhibit, ranging 
from sunlit seascapes to 
snowy trails and western vis- 
tas. 

Gallery hours are Tuesday 
through Friday, from 10 to 3; 
and Sunday, from 1 to 4. For 
more information, call 
921-3272. 



Exhibits 

Work by Leila Bakashvili 
will be on exhibit at the 
Lambertville Public Library's 
ABC Gallery, 6 Lilly 
Street, Lambertville, through 
August 12. The public is 
invited to a reception on July 
6, from 6 to 8, for "Mostly 
Flowers — Oil Paintings and 
Paper Mosaics." 

Ms. Bakashvili, a resident 
of Pennsylvania, came to the 
U.S. from Tbilisi, Republic of 
Georgia, with her husband 
and two children nearly three 
years ago. She holcb two 
degrees — doctor of medicine 
and bachelor of fine arts — 
from Tbilisi University. 

Gallery hours are Monday 
and Thursday, 1-9; Tuesday 
and Wednesday, 10-6; Fri- 
day, 1-5; and Saturday. 10-5. 
For more information, call 
397-0275. 



Artworks, the visual arts 
school of Trenton, is present- 
ing its annual student and 
member show, "Glassworks," 
through Friday, July 28, in 
the Artworks Gallery. 
The public is invited to a 
receptk>n on Friday, July 7, 
from 5 to 7, at ArtWorks' 
exhibition space in downtown 
Trenton (19 Everett Alley). 
The show celebrates the cur- 
Contlnued on Next Page 




INQUISITIVE COW: This head study by Betty Cur- 
tiss will b« at tH» Morpeth Gailary, 43 Wast Broad 
^traat^MopoweUahrdugh mid-July. Call 333-9393. 



ri 

i 



Hopewell 

Frame 

Shop 



Gallery/Framing 
Wall Design 

"We take your an to heart' 

24 W. Broad Street 

Hopewall. NJ (609)466-0617 



I 



PICTURE FRAMING... PLUS 



FINE CUSTOM FRAMING 

Fine Art • Prints • Conservation & Standard Framing 

Limited Editions • Restoration 

Photo Frames • Artifacts 

20 yrs experience • All work on premises • Over .HKX) moldings 

252-0020 • The Village Shopper 

Across Rl 2(Xi from Monlj.'onicry Shopping Center 



Do It Yourself or Custom Framing • 

frames & framers" 

I niarcer mall • rt. 1 & quakerbrldge road 
lU lawrencevllle, nj 08648 • 609-452-1091 



j^^ 




Upholstery o Furniture Gallery ♦ Paint 

Wall Coverings ♦ Floor Coverings 

Window Treatments o Art & Accessories 

Space Planning 

li/eeMJwwM. //<(><f/t<//A//, , /wot:. /. /.//.C^. 
. Uu/ai/Zum.. /Ww. . /., f'..9^i/>. 

INTERIOR DKSfGNER.-^ 

'.77ie f/nter^iH- '^Ae/i(^„ (nnfi-r t/iat </„e/i if ,t//.. . xim-e {V,i7 " 



/^ r rincHon Avenue 
II..p,«,|| 
I fT()«).-«)6-(H7(< 



SAUMS 



\ i#it our ?*lh»wnH>m 

>Mon.lay-Fri.l..ve:?()lo5:3<) 

aml?ali.ril.iy<»mUrt4J)ll 







.*,f. 






PROVENQAL SCENE: This watercolor by Elizabeth Roedell is part of the 
artist's exhibition, "Sojourn," opening in the dining room of The Medical 
Center at Princeton, on July 21. 



Art 

Continued from Preceding Page 

rent members and recent stu- 
dents, both adult and chil- 
dren, that make up the 
ArtWorks community. 

ArtWorks, originally the 
Princeton Art Association, is 
both a gallery and a visual 
arts school. It is supported by 
the Geraldine R. Dodge Foun- 
dation, the Mary Owen Bor- 
den Foundation, the NJ 
Department of Community 
Affairs, and the Mercer 
County Cultural & Heritage 
ComnUssion. 

For more Information, call 
Kathryn Triolo, at 394-9436. 



self. It is an intent to conunu- 
nicate something profound 
and yet persoiial." 

Bom in Prague, Czechoslo- 
vakia, Ms. Kohn later emi- 
grated to Ecuador. She was 
invited by the International 
Organization for Cultural Pro- 
motion of the Mexican For- 
eign Relations Ministry to 
present her first show in Mex- 
ico, after which she took up 
permanent residency in that 
country. 



Gallery hours are Monday 
to Friday, from 9 to 5. For 
more information about the 
artists and the exhibit, call 
The Williams Gallery, at 921- 
1142, or visit the website, at 
www.wmgallery.com. 

For additional information 
about ITXC, call 921-1142. 



An exhibition of work by 
three artists who show at the 
Williams Gallery — Tanya 
Kohn, Yoshikatsu Tamekane, 
and Joerg Schmelsser — will 
be at the ITXC Corpora- 
tion, 600 College Road 
East, through September. 

Entitled "Space, Time, and 
Travel — A Global Itinerary," 
the exhibition underlines the 
international aspect of ITXC's 
involvement in commimica- 
tions. The three artists are 
from Mexico, Japan, and 
Australia. 



Mr. Tamekane's work at 
ITXC is a series of Images 
representing the theme of 
travel. Four works, entided 
Baggage I, 11, IV, and V, por- 
tray shapes of varying valises 
that contzdn images of earthly 
or astral landscapes. 

Bom in Japan, Mr. Tame- 
kane is known for the addi- 
tion or rich tcxtural qualities 
to his woodblock images. His 
medium is described as 
" woodblock/collagraph . " 

Mr. Tamekane studied at 
Sokei Academy of Fine Arts. 
He is a member of the Japan 
Print Association. His art is in 
collections all over the worid. 



A recurring theme in Ms. 
Kohn's paintings is nature: 
earth, sea and sky. Using a 
variety of media and tech- 
niques, Ms. Kohn says, "Real, 
authentic artistic expression 
is, above all, introspection. It 
is an encounter with one's 



In the exhibition, Mr. 
Schmelsser — from Canber- 
ra, Australia — will show two 
images from the city of Nara, 
Japan: Yokushiji Bell and 
Banner and Hornuji Pa- 
godas. Nara is the sister city 
of Canberra- 



An exhibit of watercolors 
by Beth Kantor will take 
place through July 28 in the 
1860 House Main Gal- 
lery, 124 Montgomery 
Road, Skillman. Landscape 
themes — like sunlit sea- 
scapes, snowy trials, or west- 
em vistas — will dominate 
the exhibit, reflecting Ms. 
Kantor's varied interests and 
subject matter. 

Ms. Kantor's work has been 
published in Watercolor Mag- 
azine, Jersey Shore Publica- 
tions, and On Display. She 
has a number of awards and 
has exhibited extensively in 
both solo and group shows, 
since earning a B.A. degree 
in art history from PrirKeton 
University in 1998. 

She has participated 
recently in group shows at 
the Forbes Magazine Galler- 
ies, New York, and — In New 
Jersey — at the Essex Fine 
Art Gallery and the Polo 
Gallery. 

Gallery hours are Tuesday 
through Friday, 10 to 3, and 
Sunday, from 1 to 4. For 
more information, call 
921-3272. 




14 Vandeventer Avenue Pnnceton. New Jersey 08542 



Princeton Family Center 
for Education, Inc. 

T»« Impact of One's Own Anxiety 
on Important Relationship Systems 

Seiden Dunbar Illiclc, LCSW. CAC 

Bowen defitied anxiety as a response to a real or 
imagined tfireat. If anxiety is high, the accompanying 
automatic reflex can often ovemde thinking and govern 
behavior. The goal of this seminar is for the presenter and 
participants to increase their awareness of the impact that 
one's own anxiety and emotional reactivity can have on 
one's self and important others. 

September 15, 2000, Friday, 9:00 a.m. to noon 
Location to be announced. 

609 924 0514 _„ , 

Pleise call for locations, reservations, and for information on CEUs lor 
NJ and PA social workers, upcoming training seminare. programs, and 
other services. 



Princeton Family Center 
for Psychotherapy, Inc. 

Individual, Couple and 
Family Evaluation 
and Psychotherapy 



•'ih;«« 



■i>.i.iii<ti"»»< 



Seiden Dunbar Illick. LCSW, CAC 
Candace L. Jones, LCSW 
Jane Wei-yueh lx)w, LSW 
Kathrin W. Poole, LCSW 
Leigh Tilden. LCSW 



Please call for an appointment 



-1-' ■■- " ■ -■'■'•■- m'^.a.^Jmim. 



609 683 4180. 



FORER PHARMACY 

160 Witherspoon St. 

Pharmaceuticals 
Orthopetjic Supplies 

921-7287 




Baumley 



4339 Route 27 

Princeton, NJ 

(609) 924-6767 



Niirstn. I.;in(lscii|)iii}; ^< (i;ii(liii ( iiikr 



;w»i»--S'?;Ss*l 



WCAD/LINES 

law designers 

^'''^''^^ For Lhc Best 
^' in European 
^) Hair Design 



IN* 

«o 



o 



o 
o 

y 

X 

z 
o 



m 

a 






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^ ExcliLHivc ^alon 

- CjII lor M upfxtinl nicnl 

, 609-921-2300 

947 cSlalc Doad, Princeton 
(Poiilc 206, M Coast il 111 ion hank buildin^^) 



,M:-i:>i--^,^mim 



Continued Old Fashioned Sen/ice Since 1950 

FEED - FARrvl • GARDEM • RET SUPRLIES 
•RET Cj ROOtS/lirvJ(3 R/VRLOR" 

Just a few of the new products now in,,, 
• TORO MOWERS... 

I • Work & Hiking Boots... 

^ • Carhartt Shorts & T'Shirts... 

• Silk Flower Arrangements 
(by Christine) 
• All Occasion Greeting 
Cards with Pet Themes 

Stop by and check out _ 
new arrivals coming in weekly... 



^^ Americans Country Store^' i^S 

Weekdays 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sunday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
1 1 Rt 3 1 North & Titus Mill Rd, Pennington • 609-737-2008 



Not all mergers are about profits. 
Some are about pride. 

White Lotus Futon has proudly joined 
forces with Springfield Supportive Enrployment 

As a result, a majority of our ^ \ 

hand-made pillows will be « ^ 

stuffed by the developmentally 
disabled participants in their program 

To celebrate our joining forces we are 
offering TWO FREE PILLOWS (up 

to a $100 value!) with every purchase 
of a frame, futon, and cover. 

Offer expires July 31, 2000 

Not to tje contJined with any other offer 




hit* l»t*'« t*'t*»> 



202 nassau st. princeton 191 hamilton st. new brunswick 

609.497.1000 www.whitelotus.net 732.B28.2111 



^^ .: '*;*"*'-* \^ ^- '--■'-'^ ' -L---'^.^^. 





9< , p 

A-DOOR-A-PET I ! 



Adoring Daily, 

Overnight or Long Term 

Care Available 

for your Pets 

Lisa Watson 
609-921-2471 



Jj[ j 'Woodwinds 



II 




SPORTS 



[partners in ecology.. 






[609-924 

W* ^^M ^•'^ -^M « 



a. 

to" 
u 

Q. 
O 



DON'T TRADE IT 
DONATE IT 

• Donate your used/worn-out car 
for lax (deduction 

• Help a charity you know 

• Fast, Free pick up! 

• Car does not have to run... 
any year accepted 




1-800-577-LUNG 



AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION® 

New Jersey 

■Inlofmauon l<M wUh Itw Allomey Gwwral coocwning ItKs chantaiXe s(XicitalK)n may b» oblained tram the Anonwy General 
ol the Slate o( New Jersey by calling 973.504.6215 Hegairaiion witfi ine Ancxney General does not imply endonament ' 




PRINCETON JUNIOR SCHOOL 

Pre-School to 5th Grade 
Academic Excellence in a Nurturing Environmentl 




1^ M il I I ZJk I 

90 backler Road (where Carter Rd. mecis Ri. 2()6) 924-8126 



Does Your 

Outdoor Furniture 

Need a Facelift? 



i- 




Complete repainting and restrapping... 
We'll have your furniture 

looking like new 

at a fraction of the cost. 

Now with powder coated paint. 

We specialize in 

Brown- Jordan, Tropitone and Molla 

outdoor furniture. 

The Southern Company 

Outdoor Furniture Restrapping 

(BOO) 628-1901 

2330 Wyandotte Road 
Willow Grove, PA 1 9G9G 
(215)659-8929 
Pick up and delivery available. 





Coach, College Student, and Carpenter; 
Peter Stanton Is Not Your Average Joe 



i S 4492 U.S. Rt. 27, Princeton J 




When the seniors on the Princeton 
High lacrosse team walked off the 
field at Deibarton on June 3, after 
losing 9-4 in the state tournament quarterfi- 
nals, there was a sense of grief, an aura of 
sadness. Not only was their championship 
run cut short, but their time with one of the 
area's finest coaches, Peter Stanton, was 
over. 

Stanton has taught his players how to win 
with class, but he has also taught them how 
to lose with dignity. He 
has a great feel for the 
game, his players, and 
life itself. He is a deep 
thinker, relaxed, smil- 
ing, enjoying what he 
does. Besides coach- 
ing, he is a carpenter 
who likes small jobs. 
: remodeling and resto- L 
ration projects. Music is also his passion, 
especially music with a purpose, sung by 



too nice a guy to be an effective coach. I told 
him, 'I am who I am and I'm not going to 
change. I have my own ways of motivating 
people.'" 



H 



Two Dismal Seasons 

is team suffered through two dismal 
seasons when he first became head 
coach, but he always found a way to 
keep the kids interested in the game, and 
always measured the glass as being half full 
instead of half emp- 
ty- 

"Anything that 
ever went right, we 
made it a point of 
really praising (the 
players]," he said. "I 
was always so 
impressed with the 
kids for having the 



**l didn *t necessarily blame 
it on the team when we 
were horrible, so I don 't 
necessarily want to take 
the credit now. " 



musicians with a philosophical mind. 

"I like big, solid, songwriters," he stated, 
"somebody who can really make you think 
about something in a different light, some- 
thing that you've never thought about 
before." Some of his favorites are Bob 
Dylan, Neil Young, Richard Thompson and 
Bruce Cobum. 

Grad School in His Future 

Stanton is a part-time student at 
Rutgers University, a Geography major 
with a 3.85 GPA. He attended Stevens 
Institute of Technology, an engineering 
school in Hoboken, but never graduated. 
After finishing his undergraduate degree at 
Rutgers, he hopes to move on to graduate 
school, and then aherwards counsel kids 
while still coaching. 

"When I started back to college, 1 initially 
started taking classes that were fun, to give 
myself the best opportunity to succeed," he 
explained. "I just started opening catalogs, 
reading about courses, and just taking the 
ones that were interesting to me. By some 
odd fashion 1 ended up as a Geography 
major" 

Before he was a coach, he was also part of 
the media, working at an area newspaper 
until 1992. He was the PHS junior varsity 
lacrosse coach horn 1992-94, took a year 
off from coaching in 1995, and then 
returned as head coach of the varsity in 
1996. 

When he was hired as head coach, there 
were some questioru about his personality. "I 
remember talking to [Athletic Director) John 
Curtis about the job," he stated. "He said 
some people were worried about me being 



courage to play through the tough times. I 
could really emphasize some of the things I 
believe in, like sportsmanship and 
character." 

"You can award those things and praise 
those things," he continued. "I think those 
are the things that turn out to be the founda- 
tions for winning. Sometimes the best oppor- 
tunities to leam how to win, are when you 
are losing." 

"I always made sure that, however the 
games turned out, we took the right 
approach, and at the end of the game we'd 
walk off die field with our heads held high. 
We managed to do that during tiiose difficult 
years." 

"1 used to say. It's a lot harder to start 
where we're at and build a program up than 
to just walk into one of the great programs. 
That's an easy job.' Somehow, whatever we 
took out of that, those were the seeds for 
winning. I am really thankful to John Curtis 
for sticking with me through the difficult 
years, and giving me the opportunity to stay 
with this group and see it through." 

He is also thankful to his assistant, Greg 
Malfa, who is the head coach of the junior 
varsity lacrosse team, and who also coaches 
the YMCA seventh and eighth grade lacrosse 
players. "He stepped in with us this year, 
while still doing the YMCA," Stanton said. 
"He's just a great, great teacher." 



Players Established Goals 

art of Stanton's formula for success is 
letting the players know that they nrvat- 
ter. In fact, he allowed them to estab- 
lish their own goals for the 2000 season. 
Winning the state championship was their 
main goal. 

Continued on Next Page 



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Lacroaae Coach 

Continued from Preceding Page 

"I pretty much set one goal 
for them," he commented, 
"that we wanted to be better 
than we were last year. I gave 
them a list of the things we 
had accomplished last year. 
At diat point they set their 
minds on winning a state 
championship." 

"I didn't say, 'You guys are 
crazy for thiiiking that's pos- 
sible,'" he continued. "I said, 
'If that's what you want to 
do, let's gh« it our best shot.' 
I just encouraged them to go 
after what they had set as a 
goal. The boys made it really 
clear at the beginning of the 
season, especially the 
seniors, that they really 
wanted to work hard." 

Stanton credits the players 
for being so cooperative, and 

so focused, "h didn't really A COACH AND A STUDENT: Princeton High 
take a lot to get the desired lacrosse coach Peter Stanton guided the Tigers 
results from them, he said, to a 17-1 record this season. He is not only a 
It wasn t a matter of me coach, but a student as well, studying Geography 
doing tilcks to get them to at Rutgers University. 

work harder than they want- — — - 

ed, it was just a matier of keeping it in focus the game, craving action, 
that we were out here for hin." -My junior year we played in die semifinals 

"This is the easiest job I've ever had, of the state tournament," he said. "I was a 
coaching these guys," he continued. "They benchwarmer that year, so it wasn't any 
were extremely self motivated. I just remem- great thrill for me. 1 understand how that's a 
ber at the beginning of the season, and so really difficult thing, hanging in there, com- 
often through the season, when we would be ing to practice every day, getting yelled at." 

doing a drill, and it would be time to go on 

to die next one they would say, 'One more "Those are the kinds of tilings diat stand 
coach, two more coach, three more coach.' out to me, die unselfish efforts, die willing- 
The kids had such a great feel and under- ness of so many players to put die team 
standing of die game diat often times I relied goals first. They're die ones who ran die 
on dieir opinions." v^inj sprints, dieyre die ones who spent time 

Stanton said the captains of the 2000 on their own learning how to catch and 
team, Eric Kreiger, Brian Lalli and Dbcon throw, and they're die ones who went to the 
Hayes, were another part of the foundation camps." 

for a 17-win season. "They were just so "Coaching is just one aspect of die game," 
smart and dedicated, tenific leaders," he he continued. "The most important aspect is 
commented. "I used to joke a lot widi them, the players, and die dedication diat tiiey 
diat my job was just to cany out die balls, have. It's so common diat you hear a coach, 
and pick up all of die stuff diey left on die when die team is horrible, say, I didn't have 

anything to work with.' The same coach will 
want to take all the credit in the world when 
the team is successful." 

I didn't necessarily blame it on the team 



field afterwards. 



T 



Team Unity Is Key 

here isn't one speciftc memory of the 

2000 season diat stands above the whenTe were horriblV"^"Vdon'7ne"ces^rily 

rest, according to Stanton. Its «Jiffi- ^^„^ <„ ^^^^^ ^^ „^^^ ,^ -^^ ^^^ ^aj 

cult to separate one moment and say. Wow! ^he character to hang in diere during tiiose 

This is great! I remember tilings like die bus (t^ugh) years. They're die ones who made it 
rides home (when die team chose to stay j^ig ^ ^n. They're really die ones who 

togedier). Ordinarily odier kids would ride (^g^erve the credit " 
home with their parents instead. The cohe- ,, . „ , , , . 

siveness diat our team had stands out." ^ "« «*'^ «" f ^"^ attention that he receives 

,,_ , J „ . ... , nx>m the media is slightiy embarrassing, but 

When asked if he would have done any- ^^c smile on die players' faces makes coach- 

diiiig different during diis past season, he , ^^^e enjoyable. "Its like being blamed 

replied, It would have been to have a few ^^ somediing tfiafs not your fault. I certainly 

more guys get a Utdc more pUying time, to ^^ ^^^ p.^^jj ^^d its nice to be recog- 

have some of the odicr guys diat didn t play ^^ ^ut more importantly, its just great to 

a lot get a little bit more invoh^d in game ^ how happy die kids are. It's awesome 

day. He knows from experience how di<^ ,^^ ^ ^ f^^^ ^id on die junior 

players feel. Being a reserve player on die ^g^,^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^ „je ^^^^.^ he just 

Hunterdon Central High School lacrosse bvcs playing lacrosse. That's why I do it." 
team, he knows how it feels to sit, watching _. .„ 

-^i€ve Allen 




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AREA TOURNAMENT FINALISTS: The Princeton Reds baseball team reached 
the Babe Ruth tournament finals recently, falling short against Hightstown. 
Pictured, front row, left to right are Matt Manley, Eddie VonderSchmidt, 
Lance Williams, Rajeen Sharma and Matt Mcinemey. Second row from left to 
right are Will Cooper, Ryan 0' Grady, Matt Leuck and Jarrod Simpson. Back 
row from left to right are coaches Fred Cooper and Kevin Manley. 



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Princeton Post 218 



Heiuy, Miller and Tucholski 
^ drove in two runs apiece. 

Gains Foffeit \^CtOiy Henry also scored twice, 
iX. C_L xL» along with Tucholski <ind 

UVer SCnrOtn S Hoeland, who was 3-for-4. 

The Princeton Post 218 ^*" "^ P**^'^ up the win. 
baseball team picked up a P"ching a complete game, 
victory over Schroths Post allowing seven runs and nine 
93 in a game that was sched- "***• 
ulcd to be played on July 1. j„„e 26 Game 

Sn'^iJll^^"^^"^ "* '*'l"^ CaU it a reversal of for- 
r3 ?t^ n%^^*Jl',' ^^' but Post 218 lost 2-1 
?n S.^^0 .t r^ ^ ? to Broad Street Park Post 
on June 29, therefore its 3J3 jj^ ^ f^^ inninq on 
team forfeited the remainder i on au j • . *u 
of the season "'"^ ^^ ^*" winning in the 

"^ seas on. f^^^ j^^^^ ^^^^^ Mitchell 

_ „,„, Davis Post 182 and West 
Post 218 kwt 7-6 to Hights- Windsor Plainsboro on June 
town Post 148 in a rain- 23 and June 24 respectively, 
shortened, six-inning game Princeton found itself on the 
on Jui>e 29. Princeton trailed outside looking in against 
1-0 after a half inning of Post 313. 
play, but rallied for three runs 

^htH' ^1°!^^ "^ '""*'? Hoeland had the only RBI 

5^Lrt^^l™"J:i o^ ^ same for Princeton, 

^S^ n^i?^l' ^"^ driving i^ Graygor early in the 
another run m the bottom f^^ .^ ^^ ^J^^j^,^^ 




run m 
half of tfie inning to take a 
4-2 lead. 

Princeton allowed four 



and Kerlin all collected one 
hit each in the loss. Kerlin, 
who came in to pitch with 



J HVIIU t.<UIIC III lU Lfllt.ll WIUI 

unanswered runs in the next one out in the fifth, took the 
two innings, and trailed 64 loss. He aUowed two runs and 



going into the sixth. After giv- 
ing up another run in the final 
Inning, Princeton rallied for 
two runs in its last at bat, but 
it wasn't enough as the team 
dropped Its second straight 
game. 



two hits, but looked Impres- 
sive in striking out five bat- 
ters. —Steve Allen 



Catcher Andrew Caprariello 

was 2-for-3, scored once and , 

drove in three RBI's in the and J.D. Peters collected one 



Princeton Loses Big 
Id District 12 Toaney 

Matt Norcross, Paul Estrada 



k>ss. Third baseman Jim Hoe- hit apiece, but the offeiise did 



land scored two runs and 
added an RBI, while Nick 
Walters collected two hits, 
scored a nm, and drove in 
two RBI's. Righty Joe Tuchol- 
ski took the loss, as he 
aUowed four hits and six runs 
in five innings pitched. 

June 28 Game 

Post 218 starting pitchers 
collectively issued 12 walks in 
a 9-2 k>ss at Hamilton Post 
31 on June 28. Princeton's 
Chris Ordowkh aUowed eight 
runs and three hits, and he 
walked seven batters. 

Reliever Mike Miller 
aUowed a run, a hit, and he 
walked fh;e batters. Mark 
Henry, Andrew Caprarielte 
and Pat Kerlin had one hit 
apiece in the k>ss. Caprarle- 
Oo drove in a run, and scored 
a run, while Henry tripled 
and scored the only other run 
for Post 218. 



little else to help, jis the 
Princeton 12-year-old all 
stars lost 13-0 to Bordentown 
on July 1. It was the opening 
of the District 12 Little 
League Tournament. 

Matt Welsh opened the 
game in strong fashion for 
PriTKeton, pitchitig two soUd 
iiuiings without aUowing a 
run. Something happened in 
the third inning. The flood 
gates opened, and Borden- 
town reigned down hit after 
hit, in a six-run offensh« 
expktskm. To make matters 
worse, Bordentown scored 
twice in the fourth inning, 
and then posted five runs in 
the fiftfi inning to take a 13-0 
lead. The game was caUed 
after Princeton failed to 
scored in the bottom of the 
nitn. 



Welsh pitched four innirtgs, 
giving up nine hits and aUow- 

In a game that was caUed ing 12 runs. He was over- 

because of darkness after ^ matched by Bordentown 

complete innings, Post 218 pitcher Dan Sasso. The 511 

made the most of its opportu- giant struck out ten batters, 

nttles, raUying in the final aiKl alknved just one waUt. 

frame for an 8-7 vkrtory over PrttKeton committed six fieM- 

^k>rth Trenton Post 458. ing errors. 

Princeton traUed 7-0 after —Steve AOca 

two innings, but scored fhie 

nns in die third, and two 

theacore. 



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SPARKLING JEWELERS: The Hamilton Jewelers Dodgers ended the 2000 
season in the Princeton Youth Baseball Associaton's Major League Division 
with a spotless 14-0 record. Pictured on the front row, left to right, are Jacob 
Alperin-Sheriff, Eric Smith, Dan Blumenthal, Peter Miller, Tom Frantzen and 
Chris Brooks. Back row, left to right, are Coach Jim Smith, Nick Nehamas, 
Sam Cohen, Paul Estrada, Alex Champlin, Danny Etherton, Andrew Siegel and 
Coach Jim Brooks. Not pictured is Coach Dave Etherton. 






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Princeton All Stars 
Dominate Local Touroevs 

The Princeton 12-year-old 
All Stars won three games in 
a row at the Montgomerv 
Toumanient recently, defeat- 
ing Branchburg 4-1 in extra 
innings, Hillsborough 11-1, 
and Montgomery 5-1. 

In its game against Branch- 
burg, both teams battled to a 
scoreless tie through eight 
innings before Jon Dinan 
slapped a double into the out- 
field with bases loaded, driv- 
ing in three runs. 



Amwell Valley 11-1, and 
Flemington 5-1. In game one 
against Somerset, Princeton 
jumped to an early 5-0 lead 
aher one itming. 

Leading 10-1 after 5-1/2 
innings, Somerset chopped 
into the lead, scoring seven 
mns. It looked as if it would 
add another run until Prince- 
ton's Casey Huckel made a 
running catch in left field to 
end the inning. Estrada struck 
out the final two batters in 
the sixth inning to end the 
game. 



runs in the final inning, 
Princeton was only able to 
score orK:e in its final at bat. 

Robbie Begin led the team, 
going 3-for4, and scoring 
twice. Lauri was l-for-2, and 
scored orKe, while O'Brien 
was l-for-3, driving in the 
team's only two runs. 



Kyle Rasavich helped the 
Princeton All Stars demolish 
Hillsborough in the second 
game of the tournament. He 
struck out five batters in just 
three innings pitched. Matt 
Welsh and Sanjiv Sharma 
each pitched one inning and 
farmed two batters apiece. 
Sharma also helped offen- 
sively by doubling twice. Paul 
Estrada, Hasani Gordon and 
Adam Spar all collected two 
singles in the victory. 



In the third game of the 
tournament, Dinan and Matt 
Norcross started the game off 
with back to back singles. 
Estrada then belted a three- 
run homer to put the Prince- 
ton All Stars in front 3-0. 

Gordon slapped a single 
into the outfield in the second 
inning, stole second, and then 
came around to score follow- 
ing a base hit by Tyler Moni. 
Tyler Blumenschine scored in 
the fifth inning, stealing 
home, and upping the lead to 
5-0. Estrada came on in 
relief, and struck out the side 
in the sixth inning for the 
victory. 

Amwoell Invitational 

In the recently played 
South County Invitational 
Tournament in Amwell Val- 
ley, the Princeton All Stars 
defeated Somerset 11-7, 



The second game against 
Amwell Valley was a laugher 
for Princeton. Blumenschine 
pitched four innings, allowing 
one hit and striking out seven 
batters. Dinan and Huckel 
collected three hits. The high- 
light of the game was a home 
run by Rasavich in the fifth 
inning. 

A Jour-run fourth inning 
propelled Princeton to a vic- 
tory over Flemington in the 
third game of the tourna- 
ment. Norcross, Estrada, 
Moni, Blumenschine, Huckel 
and Tom Frantzen all singled 
in the inning. 

—Steve ADen 



Princeton opened the tour- 
nament with a 15-2 blowout 
loss to heavily favored Ewing 
on June 30. The team man- 
aged only one hit in a game 
that was called after five 
innings because of the ten 
run rule. Begin scored one of 
the team's two runs on the 
afternoon. Lauri scored once, 
arwl collected an RBI in the 
losing cause. 

— Steve Allen 




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Princeton Cranbury 
Bows Out of Tourney 

Princeton Cranbury had its 
chances against Lawrence, 
but was bounced from the 
Babe Ruth 13-year-old Dis- 
trict One double elimination 
tournament, 7-5 on July 2. 
Princeton came from behind 
several times, but wasn't able 
to control the Lawrence 
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Princeton trailed in the first 
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fourth inning, but then put 
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[Sports Fans! 

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DIDN'T 

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John Bernard 



Jay Bernard 



STURHAHN, DICKENSON & BERNARD 



As One of Our Best Institutions, 
Library Siiouitt Stay Wiiere it is; 

To the Editor of Town Topic*: 

Recently, In Town Topics, we have read many cjosefy- 
reasoned letters explaining why we should disassemble or 
relocate the Ubrary. The arguments Include: High tech fore- 
cast — replacement of printed books by electronic boote te 
so Imminent that a Ubrary may no longer be needed. High 
tech bugaboo - electromagnetic radiation from the house 
wiring In the present building endangers the heakh of library 
users Lofty civic duty — turning the building over to a 
tax-paying business would help to alleviate the Borough s 
perennial scramble for greater tax revenue. Solution to the 
parking problem — Moving the Ubrary would free up the 
parking spaces next door now used by Ubraiy employees. 
(They don't park there.) 

My own contrarian view Is that we should keep the library 
strong and keep it where it is. It is the most efficiently 
managed of our public sendees. In Princeton s cluttered 
center, the library is an Island of tranquility, set in an 
indifferent sea of tombstones, parking lots and traffic con- 
gestion. It brings young and old together in a congenial 
setting and promotes the social cohesion that we are losmg 
elsewhere. This Is not a time to nibble away at our best 
institutions. It is a time, rather, for vision and hope. 

RICHARD WILLIAMS 
Wheatsheaf Lane 

Annual Fete Is a Community Builder 
As Well as a Successful Fund Raiser 

To the Editor of Town T€tpk»: 

It Was a Jungle out There and we all had a fabutous time! 
The 47th Annual June Fete Is history and we want to thank 
everyone In the community who supported this event. Yes, 
the Fete is a hmdralser. But more importantly, the Fete is a 
community bulkier. U is a way to encourage volunteerism 
and community spirit, and this year we beUeve it was an 
incredibly successful event. More than 30 Fete first timers 
chaired committees. We were able to create partnerships 
with many new corporate and community groups. For the 
first time ever, seniors from the Princeton Regional High 
School spent a service day at the fete fields and helped with 
all the last minute activities. 

Gokbnan Sachs sent a group of employees to help set up 
the Fete Auction. On Fete Saturday, representatives hxjm 
boy scouts, glri scouts, service organizations, nursery 
school, churches, local restaurants, and local companies 
manned game and food booths. It was members of the 
community providing a day of hm for the rest of the 
community. 

Through the hard work of our volunteers and the generos- 
ity of the community, the Auxiliary will be able to donate 
more than $200,000 to the Medk:al Center at Princeton for 
their cancer programs. Thank you to each and every one 
who played a part in making this event such a success. 
Being a part of the Fete family Is a very rewarding experi- 
ence. Why not try it next year? CaU the Auxiliary oHUx at 
4974069 and let us know that you'd Uke to be a part of 
Fete 2001 . ^^^^ BRUBAKER BURNS 

JEANINNE BURETTE HONSTBN 
Fete 2000 Co-Chairs 



DENTISTRY 



How can a batter in 
baseball have 11 pitches 
thrown to him during 
one time at bat — with 
none of them being fouls 
— AND STILL 
REMAIN AT BAT? ... 
Here's the answer to this 
puzzler ... The batter 
comes up with 2 out and 
a man on first, and gets a 
count of 3 and 2 ... Then 
the runner at first is 
picked off, ending that 
inning ... The same bat- 
ter would lead off the 
next inning in what's 
officially considered the 
same time . at bat, and 
again runs the count to 3 
and 2, then gets ball 4 ... 
That gives him 11 
pitches — with no fouls 
— in one time at bat. 

• » • 

The biggest baseball bat 
in the world is 120 feet 
high and weighs 31 tons 



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lighter teeth that mimic enam- 
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texture if it is to avoid the 
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M. c- iT-7'rrr"-'"' ' l 



in Library's Present Location It Is Easy 
To Combine Other Errands with a Visit 

To the Editor of Town Topic*: 

1 disagree with the letter printed In TOWN TOPICS on 
June 28 stating that building a new library at Valley Road is 
a win-win situation. 

One of the diings that 1 really like about living In Prince- 
ton is walking to the shops, restaurants and the library. In 
Its present location. It Is easy to combine miscellaneous 
errands with a trip to check out books. That would not be 
tnie if the Ubraiy is moved. 

I bring my 5-year-old with me when walking and am not 
concemed about our safety because of traffic. We enjoy our 
easy access to the library and hope that It will continue to 
be avaUable. HLEEN BIRD 

Moran Avenue 

Smoicing Ban Advocates Are Paternaiists 
With a Hefty Sense of Seif Entitiement 

To the Editor of Jomm Topics: 

In a letter in your June 28 edition, [TOWN TOPICS June 
281 Ingrid Robertshaw defends the recent smoking ban by 
asserting that she spends time "in California where the 
entire state has a no-smoke policy" aiwl has "never heard 
anyone complain about the law. " She defends the ban 
because she is "not willing to sit in restaurants where smok- 
ers" make Ufc unpleasant for her, and because smokers 
remind her of her mother-in-law. 

First, I wonder whether Ms. Robertshaw Is aware of the 
fact that the population of California is approximately 33 
million. I'm sure that Ms. Robertshaw spends a lot of time in 
California, but even so, I somehow doubt tiiat she's can- 
vassed the views of a statistically significant fraction of its 
residents. 

Second, if Ms. Robertshaw is genuinely "not willing" to sit 
next to smokers, I have a piece of advice for her. don't. No 
one Is forcing Ms. Robertshaw to sit anywhere; If she 
doesn't want to sit next to smokers, she shouldn't patronize 
restaurants that allow smoking. If Ms. Robertshaw took her 
own words seriously, she would note that the meaning of 
the phrase "I am not willing to sit" Is "I shall not sit;" — not, 
"1 shall impose my will on others, aher choosing to sit." 

Finally. I think it's worth reminding Ms. Robertshaw that 
laws and regulations don't exist to help us repress unpleas- 
ant memories about our in-laws. If we enacted laws on this 
basis, we would quickly destroy whatever remnants of the 
mle of law we have left In this country. 

Laws exist to protect individual rights. In this case, the 
rights in question are the rights of property and free associa- 
tion A restaurant owner owns his or her restaurant, and has 
the right to set the tenns of ti^de there. People are Invited 
to patronize the restaurant on the owner's publicly- 
advertised tenns. They have the right to accept those tenns 
or reject them. If they accept them, they consent to accept 
the consequences of their decision. If they aren't wUllng to 
accept the consequences, they shouldn't accept the terms. 

A restaurant owner who puts up a sign that says "No 
Smoking" has the right to turn smokers away from his or 
her restaurant — as most do. An owner who puts up a sign 
that says "Smoking Section Available" (or whatever) Is pro- 
viding notice to anyone who enters that there nught be 
smokers inside. Compulsive smokers should avoid the first 
kind of restaurant; vehement non-smokers should avoid the 
second. 

What one doesn't have is the right to barge into some- 
ones restaurant, and dictate the terms of trade to owners 
and consenting customers by force -whether one is the 
Princeton Regional Health Commission, or just a selt- 
appointed paternalist with a hefty sense of entitiement. 

I don't smoke at all or even spend much time eating in 
any of Princeton's restaurants. But there is a principle here 
that advocates of the smoking ban have conslstcntiy misrep- 
resented and evaded: the principle of rights. Either restaura- 
teurs have rights or they don't. If tiiey do, the ban should be 
repealed. If they don't, neither do the rest of us. I wonder if 
the advocates of the ban can overcome their addiction to 
coercion quickly enough to figure that out. 

IRFAN A. KHAWAJA 
Linden Lane 



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(609)951-8585 



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Opera Tickets for Under $25 Are 
A Good Deal for Higli Quality Show 

To the Editor of Town Topics: 

The anger expressed in the letter of Miriam L. Yevick in 
your issue of June 28 (TOWN TOPICS. June 28) is some- 
thing with which I can sympathize. 

Everything does seem to go "up" in Princeton. But I want 
to address one sentence in the Yevick letter — "one must 
rejoice at the move of the opera company from a low-key, 
rustic setting to the splendid McCarter Theatre at the cost of 
now unaffordable ticket prices." 

The move to McCarter Theatre was made for completely 
professional reasons, not to milk the public with high priced 
seats. Despite the rural Lawrenceville ambience, which I still 
personally miss, the conditions in which our company per- 
formed were "rustic" beyond belief. That is a story I can fill 
in chapter and verse, but not here. Ms. Yevick was in the 
audience. While she was evidently happily sitting there, I 
knew about the inadequacies backstage and below stage, 
which were only the beginning of the company's difficulties 
in producing in the Kirby Arts Center at Lawrenceville. 

No organization can stand still and expect to survive. 
McCarter answered our immediate professional needs to 
help us fulfill our mission — to present the most complete 
ensemble opera productions possible. 

There are tickets in the $22-24 range, which is not a bad 
deal considering the recognized high quality of our current 
productions. I sat in a $22 seat last night for Falstaff. 

JOHN A. ELLIS 
Founding Chairman, Opera Festival of New Jersey 

Winant Road 



Stephen E. Heeler, m.d., f.a.a.p. 



is pleased to announce 
the addition of 



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PRINCETON-WINDSOR PEDIATRICS, P.A. 

50 Princeton Highlslown Road 

Princeton Junction, New Jersey 08550 

Telephone 609-799-4700 

Fax 609-799-4545 



S.A.V.E 




"JORDAN" 
1 -Year-Old Male, Orange with White Paws 

V/ant my advice for staying cool this summer? OK, here it is: 
1 . Adopt a shelter cat (I'll be the cat). 
<?. Squeeze a lemon into a tall glass Add water, ice, a da^h 
of maple syrup, salt, mint leaves. Stir. 

3. Pour a Ixiwl of water (for me) A- A 

4. Sit under a shade tree. ^^^ 

5. Sip the lemonade. Pet the cat. ^^W 
It's simple. \f 



Uf 



Shade and plenty of water are essential for pets comfort and 
well being during yie hot days of summer Large dogs and 
short nose dogs are particularly vulnerable to overheating 
Parlted cars in summer sun are much too hot for pets, so 
leave your best IrierKls home during the hottest days. 

609-921-6122 
Princeton Small Animal Rescue League 

P.O. Box 1 5, 900 Herrontown Road 
Princeton, New Jersey 08542 



Current Laws on Control of Dogs 
Fail to Protect Public From Attacks 

To the Editor of Town Topic*: 

I am writing to urge a revision of the law concerning the 
control of dogs because I believe they are falling to protect 
us from attack. On May 28th I was attacked by three dogs, 
two huge and one small, as I was biking on Van Kirk Road. I 
was bitten by one, requiring six stitches, tetanus and rabies 
shots. 

Although I succeeded in outriding them, I realize I could 
have been killed or seriously injured. The owners claimed 
that they were confined by an electric fence which obviously 
was not effective. 

I have also been threatened by dogs barking at me from 
front lawns, not confined, and have been told by our animal 
control officer that this is legal as long as the animal is on 
the owner's property. Although 1 continue to bicycle and 
walk. It is with anxiety that I am unsafe. In dread, I think of 
the possible consequences to small children. 

ADELEVFXLER 
Carver Place, Lawrenceville 



Princeton Public Library 

open 7 Days A Week 
For Your Convenience 

Monday - Thursday 9:00 am - 9:00 pm 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 am - 6:00 pm 

Sunday 1 :00 pm - 6:00 pm 

65 WItherspoon Street 924-9529 

www.princetonlibrary.org 




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Paint <2^ Wallpaper 

Let us drop a name... or two... 
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Community Education 

Ws not just a program - 
it's our commitmentto you and your family. 



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"As Your Baby Grows" 

This weekly class and discussion group addresses concerns 

parents may have during the first year of their baby's life. 

Fridays, from 10:00 to 1 1:30 a.m. 

Lambert House, Classroom 1 

Cost: $5.00 

Future topics will include postpartum blues and an 

immunization update. For more information or to receive a 

complete schedule, please call 609-497-4442. 

No pre-registration is necessary. Babies are welcome! 



^ 



^^ New Jersey Safety Program 
Defensive Driving Course 

Saturday, October 14, 9:00 a.m.-3 :00p.m. 

Ground Floor Conference Room 

Upon completion of the course, all New Jersey licensed 

drivers will save a minimum of 5% on their car insurance 

costs for 3 full years. If they have any DMV points, 

2 points will be reduced from their driving record. 

The cost of the course is $60. 

To register, please call 908-369-0987. 

Registration is required. 



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Wednesday, July S ' 

7-7:30 p.m.: Meet the May- 
ors, Borough Mayor Marvin 
Reed and guest Celia Taze- 
laar, Borough Historical Pres- 
ervation Review Committee. 
Uvc. CaU In. 252-2379. 

7:40 p.m.: Princeton Coun- 
try Dancers Community Meet- 
ing, Suzanne Patterson Cen- 
ter, Monument Drive (behind 
Borough Hall). Dance fol- 
lows, from 8 to 10. 

Thursday, July 6 

6 p.m.: Concert, Phoenix 
Rising; Courtyard, Princeton 
Shopping Center. 

7:30 p.m.: Summer Song 
Festival; Bristol Chapel, 
Westminster Choir College. 

7:30 p.m.: Regional Plan- 
ning Board, Township Munic- 
ipal Building. 

8 p.m.: Family Night, Salsa 
Band; Rutgers SummerFest, 
Nicholas Music Center, New 
Brunswick. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

SEALED BIDS will be received from bidders classified under N J S A. 
27:7-35 1 el seq . in the NJDOT IWIULTI-PURPOSE ROOM, tslew Jersey 
Department ot Transportation. 1035 Pathway Avenue, until 10:(X) am. 
on 7/27/00 and opened and read for; 

MAINTENANCE BRIDGE PAINTING 
CONTRACT #2000-2 (2000). SIX (6) BRIDGES - ROUTE US 1 
CITY OF TRENTON 
COUNTY OF MERCER 
FEDERAL PROJECT #STP-A00S(561) 
DP #00420 
The Dopartnient. in accordance with Title VI Civil Rights Ad ot 1964, 78 Stat 
252 U SC. 49 C.F.R . Parts 21 and 23 issued pursuant to such Act. and 
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 will afford minonly business 
enlerpnses full opportunity to submit bids in response lo this invitation and will 
not discnmlnale againsi any bidder on the grounds of race, color, sex. 
national origin, or handicap in the contract award Bidders are required to 
comply with the requirements of PL 1975. c 127. NJAC 17:27 
Drawings, specifications, and bid documents may be inspected or obtained 
tor a lee of '15 00. for full size drawings, at the r4JDOT Plans Distnbulion 
Building #8 Thiokol, PC BOX 600, Trenton. New Jersey 08625 dunng busi- 
ness hours. Names and addresses of prospective bidders for this protect may 
be acquired by telephoning 609 530-8584 ot 609-530-8585 dunng business 
hours Their fax number is 609-530-8347 

Drawings, supplemental specilications. and bonng logs may also be 
inspected (BUT NOT OBTAINED) by contracting organizations at our vanous 
Design Field Offices at the lollowmg locations 

200 Stierii Court. Ml Arlington, NJ •973-770-5141 

Route 79 & Daniels Way, Freehold, NJ • 732-308-4025 

3906 Church Road, Mt Laurel, NJ • 856-866-4953 

New Jersey Department of Transportation 

Bureau of Construction Services, Procurement Division 

Fee $72 



8 p.m.: The Wizard of Oz; 
Open Air Theatre, Washing- 
ton Crossing State Park. /Mso 
Friday and Saturday at 8. 

8 p.m.: Rutgers Summer- 
Fest, Kalichstein-Laredo- 
Robinson Trio; Nicholas 
Music Center, New Bruns- 
wick. 

Friday, July 7 

7 p.m.: Princeton Rep 
Shakes|>eare Festival, A Mid- 
summer Night's Dream; 
Pettoranello Gardens, Com- 
munity Park North. Also Sat- 
urday and Sunday at 7. 

8 p.m.: Opening Night, Six 
Characters in Search of an 
Author, Opera Festival of 
New Jersey; McCarler 
Theatre. 

Saturday, July 8 

7:30 p.m.: Bach Festival, 
St. Matthew Passion; Bristol 
Chapel, Westminster Choir 
College. 

8 p.m.: Opera Festival of 
New Jersey, Carmen; Mc- 
Carter Theatre. 

8 p.m.: Rutgers Summer- 
Fest, Rutgers Festival Orches- 
tra; Nicholas Music Center, 
New Brunswick. 



tional group, near Forrestal 
Village. CaU 520-1767. 

Tuesday, July 11 

1 7:30 p.m.: Sing-in, 
Brahms' Ein deutsches 
Requiem; Bristol Chapel, 
Westminster Choir College. 

8 p.m.: Osiris Piano Trio; 
Richardson Auditorium. 

8:30 p.m.: Borough Coun- 
cil, Borough Hall. Work 
session. 

Wednesday. July 12 

5:30 p.m.: Borough Hous- 
ing Authority, Clay Street 
Learning Center, 2 Clay 
Street. 

7-7:30 p.m.: Meet the May- 
ors, Rerun of June 26 broad- 

Continued on Next Page 




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Sunday, July 9 

p.m.: Summer Carillon 



Series, Robert Grogan, 
National Shrine of the 
Immaculate Conception, 
Washington,, D.C.; Graduate 
College. 

2 p.m.: Opera Festival of 
New Jersey, Falstaff; Mc- 
Carter Theatre. 

7:30 p.m.: The Songs of 
Marc Blitzstein and Kurt 
Weill; Bristol Chapel, 
Westminster Choir College 

Monday, July 10 

7:30 p.m.: Gk>ia, women's 
a cappella and improvisa- 



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Calendar 

Continued from Preceding Page 

cast of Township Mayor Phyl- 
lis Marchand with guest Mary 
Ann Saleskl, director of the 
July 17-23 Senior Men's PGA 
Tounuiment at Jasna Polana. 

7:30 p.m.: Opera Festival 
of New Jersey, Six Charac- 
ters in Search of an Author; 
McCarter Theatre. 

8 p.m.: South Pacific; 
Bucks County Playhouse, 
New Hope, Pa. Also Thurs- 
day and Friday at 8, Saturday 
at 5 and 9, Wednesday, 
Thursday and Sunday at 2. 

8 p.m.: Rutgers Summer- 
Fest, Stanley Cowell Trio; 
Nicholas Music Center, New 
Brunswick 



3 

o 





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at Princeton newsstands, Wednesday mornings after 9. 



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Sarah Khatcherian, 

daugtiter of Nerces and Sona 
Khatcfierian, Princeton, 
recently received a bachelor 
of music degree from West- 
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Khatcherian is a 1996 gradu- 
ate of Princeton High School. 



They included Kathleen C. 
Dyer. Belle Mead, B.A., 
political science; Jesse 
Dilanni. Hopewell, B.S., 
business administration; Lee 
H. Batcha, Pennington, 
B.S., business administration; 
James D. Moyer, Penning- 
ton, B.S., business adminis- 
tration; and Marshall C. 
Keener, Princeton, B.S., 
environmental studies. 



emony at Boston College in 
the fall. The NSCS is a 
national honors organization 
that recognizes first- and 
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students who excel academi- 
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to begin teaching seventh 
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Five area students gradu- 
ated from the University of 
Vermont at commencement 
exercises held on the campus 
in Buriington, in May. 



Princeton resident Lauren 
Zobro was recently accepted 
for membership in the 
National Society of Collegiate 
Scholars (NSCS), and will be 
honored during a campus ccr- 



Megan Collier, daughter 
of f^chard and Janet Collier, 
Belle Mead, was awarded a 
B.A. degree at the 124th 
commencement of Boston 
College, on May 22. 

A graduate of Stuart Coun- 
try Day School, Ms. Collier 
made the honor roll during 
seven of her eight semesters 
at Boston College, In Septem- 



Jonathan L. Harwood, a 

1986 graduate of Princeton 
High School, was recently 
inducted into the Temple Uni- 
versity (Philadelphia, Pa.) 
chapter of Ptil Beta Kappa. A 
liistory major at Temple, with 
a minor in French, Mr. Har- 
wood plans to attend law 
school following his gradua- 
tion. He is a member of Phi 
Alpha, the history honors 
society. 

Conlinu»<l on PaQ* 41 




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8 p.m.: The Wizard of Oz; " 
Open Air Theatre, Washing- 
ton Crossing State Park. Also 
Thur^y, Friday, Saturday, 
at 8. . - 

8-10:30 p.m.: Princeton ^^jQHiMQ pnoM THE BLANKET SEATS: Kartene 
Country Dancers, Suzanne Holmes Bethea and daughter Marcia Bethea, age 
Patterson Center. Monument g ^^j^^ ||,g Saturday night fireworks sponsored by 
Drive (behind Borough Hall). ^^^ Spirit of Princeton at the Fete fields. iciwieiPKoonoio' 

Thuraday, July 13 

6-8 p.m.: Camaby Street, 
British pop music; Courtyard, 
Princeton Shopping Center. 

7:30 p.m.: The Umburg 
Choir; The Playhouse, 
Westminster Choir College. 

7:30 p.m.: PrirKeton Envi- 
ronmental Commission, Val- 
ley Road Building. 



1 .800-6-CLOSET 609-268-8340 



Friday. July 14 

7 p.m.: Princeton Rep 
Shakespeare Festival, A Mid- 
summer Night's Dream; 
PettoraneUo Gardens, Com- 
munity Park North, Route 
206. Also Saturday and Sun- 
day at 7. 

7:30 p.m.: "A Spanish 
Songbook"; Bristol Chapel, 
Westminster Choir College. 

8 p.m.: Opera Festival of 
New Jersey, Carmen; 
McCarter Theatre. Final 
performance 

8 p.m.: Amadeus Festival, 
New Jersey Symphony 
Orchestra; Richardson 
Auditorium. 

8 p.m.: Rutgers Summer- 
Fest, Miami String Quartet; 
Nicholas Music Center, New 
Brunswick 

8 p.m.: Will You Still Love 
Me in the Morning?; Off- 
Broadstreet Theatre, Hope- 
well. Also Saturday at 8 and 
Sunday at 2:30 

Saturday, July 15 

8 p.m.: Opera Festival of 
New Jersey, Falstaff; 
McCarter Theatre. 

8 p.m.: Rutgers Sumn»er- 
Fest, Rutgers Festival Orches- 
tra; Nicholas Music Center, 
New Bruriswick. 



SENIOR CITIZENS CALENDAR 

Wednesday, July 5 • Wednesday, July 12 

Information Provided by Senior Resource Center 924-7108 
SENIOR RESOURCE CENTER at Spruce Circle (Spruce) and 
SUZANNE PATTERSON CENTER (SPatC). on Monument Drive 
Meed Guidance? Information about resources 
tor the older adult Call OATA, 924-7108 
Community Park Pool Seniors Program: 
Sr Lap Swim Mon-Fri 10-noon; Sal & Sun: 10-1 1 am. 
Sr. Dip: Mon-Fri 1 1 -noon; Sat & Sun 10-11 a.m. 

Wednesday: 10 30 a m Let's Talk: RC. 

3 00 p m Lets Talk Too!; Spruce. 

Thursday: 9 00 am Shopping. Call 924-7108. 

10:00 am. The Joy ol Yoga (last class); SPatC. 

12 30 p m Pinochle; SPatC 

2 30 p m SHIP.; Elm Court. Call 924-7108. 

Friday: 10 30 a m SHIP: Spruce Call 924-7108. 

10:30 am Ping Pong; SPatC 

1:00 p.m. Senior Citizen Club Meeting; SPatC. 

6 30 p.m. Bingo; Elm Court 

7:00 p m Pokeno; Clay Street Learning Center. Call 497-1286 

Monday: 10:30 am Flexercise with Joce (last class/Pot Luck 

Lunch); Spruce „„ .^ ^ ,, , 

11:00 am Chair Massage with Nancy Alexander; SPatC. Call lor 

apt 

6 30 p.m. Bingo; Elm Court. ..„, ..oo^. 

7.00 p m Pokeno; Clay Street Learning Center. Call 497-1286 tor 

info 

Tuesday: 10 00 am Tai Chi (new 5-week session/»15); SPatC. 

12:30 pm Social Bridge; SPatC. , -, . i, 

2:00-3:30 p m. Caregivers Support Group, led by Beverly Zola No 

lee; Redding Circle 

Wednesday: 10 30 am Lets Talk; RC. , , c-c ,r 

10 45 am Line Dancing (new class/'IO tor 10 weeks); SPatC 

I 00 p.m. Elder Fraud Presentation; SPatC 

3.00 p m Lets Talk Too'; Spruce 



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Dr. Harvey Rothberg 

Continued from Page 1 

Princeton Healthcare Center, 419 North 
Harrison Street.] 

Dr. Rothberg's loss will be keenly feh at 
the hospital, as well, from nursing floor unit 
secretaries to Medical Center President Den- 
nis Doody. 

Daisy Hubbard, unit secretary on the sev- 
enth floor of J Building, has known Dr. Roth- 
berg for more than 30 years. When she talks 
about him, she emphasizes his compassion 
"with patients and with employees. He is not 
only a doctor, but also a friend." 

Mr. Doody, hospital administrator for 25 
years, notes that Dr. Rothberg was instru- 
mental in improving the hospital's cancer 
care and its medical education program. "He 
will be very sorely missed." 

Dr. Rothberg first came to Princeton 55 
years ago — to attend Princeton University, 
from which he graduated magna cum laude 
in 1949. He then went on to Harvard Medi- 
cal School, where he graduated cum laude 
in 1953. 

After completing an internship and resi- 
dency in medicine at Massachusetts General 
Hospital, Boston, the young doctor accepted 
a civilian position as internist in the Walter 
Reed Army Institute of Research, department 
of hematology, Washington, D.C. In Septem- 
ber 1956, he began two years of service as a 
Captain in the Medical Corps U.S. Army 
Reserve, and was assigned to the same 
department. 

The decision to return to Princeton in 
1960, to join the Princeton Medical Group, 
was not difficult. Dr. Rothberg recalled 
recently. "I was attracted by living in a uni- 
versity town, and by the presence of an 
excellent, quality medical group," he said, 
"and I felt at home here." 

"When Harvey came on, he was a veiy 
keen, bright general internist at tfie start; 
and he immediately entered the teaching pro- 
gram," Dr. Wright remembers. 

For several years, Dr. Rothberg served as 
Director of Medical Education at the hospi- 
tal, and was instrumental in bringing about 
an affiliation with the Rutgers Medkal 
School, now the Robert Wood Johnson Med- 
ical School, part of the University of Medi- 
cine and Dentistry of New Jersey. 

"When I arrived," he explains, "the Medical 
Center at Princeton was not exactly sleeping, 
but it was awakening; it was not simple, but 
it hadn't realized its full promise and poten- 
tial. I have seen it develop into a modem 
medical center." 

Over the years, as well, Dr. Rothberg has 
seen the practice of medicine change. "De- 
spite the onset of computers, new techniques 
and procedures, one thing must still be kept 
in mind," he insists. "It is the concept of 
caring ..." 

For years, he said, he anticipated continu- 
ing on a part-time basis aher retirement. 
With the advent of managed care, however, 
he decided against it. The unwritten contract 
between doctor and patient which used to be 
at the heart of medical practice has been 
subverted by insurance companies and 
HMOs, he says. 

"I believe In the idea of progress, but I 
think the system of delivering medicine is in 
trouble — and I don't know the solution. 
Care may be better than it used to be, but It 
Is also more expensive; and managed care 
has created barriers between doctors and 
patients. To the extent that access is nxne 
diffknih. the system is flawed." 

First Oncologist 

Certified in hematology and internal 
medklne. Dr. Rothberg became the 
first cancer specialist in the group, 
working in what Dr. Wright described as "a 
very gloomy comer of medicine." 

When he began. Dr. Rothberg concedes, 
"There were many patients and few reme- 
dies, h was a challenge to understand cancer 
aiKl to help people who had cancer." He 
became a board-certified oncologist in 1973, 
the first year that exams were gh«n in that 
specialty. 
His Interest grew out of hematology 




Harvey Rothberg, M.D. 

research, he says. "Hematologists used drugs 
to which other tumors responded. I have 
seen the field of oncology transformed into 
one which has brought comfort — and in 
many cases, cures — to patients. My profes- 
sional career has, happily, coincided with 
great changes in the diagnosis, management, 
and understaruling of cancer." 

John Baumann, a radiation orjcologist, is 
chief of radiation therapy at the Medical Cen- 
ter. He is a specialist in the treatment of 
cancer by radiation, while Dr. Rothberg's 
focus in treatment Is chemotherapy. Fre- 
quently, Dr. Baumann sees patients who 
have been referred by Dr. Rothberg. 

"It Is ahvays a pleasure and a privilege," he 
toU TOWN TOPICS. "His patients are 
ahvays so well cared for. All the necessary 
tests have been done; and there are certain 
things you just won't have to worry about. 

Personal Responsibility 

Dr. Rothberg is a physician who "really 
and truly cares about his patients," 
Dr. Baumann pointed out, "and that 
is the foundation from whkh everything else 
flows. He was trained and steeped in some of 
the finest institutions In American medicine, 
where doctors leam to do things right. He 
ahvays takes personal responsibility for his 
patients. The Medkal Center is losing a great 
one." 

"His patients aU bve him," noted Don Den- 
ny, a radtologist with the Princeton Radiology 
A»ociates. "He is a very people-oriented 
physician. If he orders a chest X-ray, for 
example, he dways comes by to read it him- 
self. Not all doctors do tfiat." 

In his metkukxis attention to detail and his 
inslsteiKe that everything be done exactly 
right. Dr. Rothberg doesn't let any member 
of his medical team — intern, resklent, nurse 
— off the hook. "He Is a brilliant man with a 
wonderful sense of humor, who wants the 
team with him at all times," commented 
Marty Kennedy, the head nurse on J-7. She 
has kiKMvn Dr. Rothberg since she came to 
the Medkral Center 21 years ago. 

"When Dr. Rothberg comes to the fkx)r, he 
expects you to drop everything and partici- 
pate with him. In reality, he is a gentle, kind 
person, but you have to be prepared for his 
comments." 

New nurses, Ms. Kennedy said, are some- 
times scared of Dr. Rothberg. "They're ah^id 
to say anything at first; but the young nurses, 
medical students, interns and residents will 
have lost something by not knowing him." 

Donna Baumann was both a patient of Dr. 
Rothberg's and his office nurse for eight 
years. It was Dr. Rothberg, in fact, who 
encouraged her to go into nursing, despite 
some serious health problems. 

Now a nurse with Presbyterian Homes of 
New Jersey, Ms. Baumann declares of Dr. 
Rothberg, "He is the most conscientious doc- 
tor I've ever known. He was not one to shoot 
the breeze," she adds, "and sometimes he 

Continued on Next Page 



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Graduates 

Continued (rom Page 39 

Kartliik Dcvur^ian, Law- 
renceville, received a Ph.D. 
degree in mathematical sci- 
ences from Northern Illinois 
University, DeKalb, III., on 
May 13. Mr. Devarajan also 
holds an M.S. degree in engi- 
neering from Birla Institute of 
Technology and Science, 
Pilani, India, and an M.S. 
degree in statistics from 
Northern Illinois University. 

Mr. Devarajan is a biostatis- 
tician with Bristol-Myers 
Squibb, in Princeton. 



PEOPLE in the News 



Adam Harvey, Hornor 
Lane, received a bachelor's 
degree in business adminis- 
tration, magna cum laude, 
from Temple University, Phil- 
adelphia, on May 18. Mr. 
Harvey is a 1 996 graduate of 
Princeton High School. 




nations of the design process. 
It is the first monograph to 
fully explore Louis i. Kahn's 
buih and unbuilt Trenton 
plans, the project that 
launched the renowned archi- 
tect's mature career. 



Tyler Thorndike, Pen- 
nington, received a B.A. 
degree in business adminis- 
tration from Western State 
College, Gunnison, Colo., in 
May. 

He is a graduate of Hope- 
well Valley Central High 
School. 



Gregoiy PkareDo, Law- 
renceville, received a bache- 
lor's degree in history and 
philosophy from Syracuse 
University, Syracuse, N.Y., in 
May. 



Princeton resident Jacque- 
Une Lea Gottfried has been 
elected to the Phi Beta Kappa 
academic honorary society at 
Johns Hopkins University, 
Baltimore, Md. Ms. Gottfried 
graduated from the University 
in May, with a major in writ- 
ing seminars. 



Susan Solomon 

Susan Solomon, Hardy 
Drive, is the author of a new 
book entitled Louis i. Kahn's 
Trenton Jewish Communit]/ 
Center, published by Prince- 
ton Architectural Press, New 
York. It includes 70 black- 
and-white photographs, and 
is available in paperback for 
$19.95. 

Dr. Solomon, an indepen- 
dent curator, received her 
Ph.D. from the University of 
Pennsylvania in 1997. The 
book was adapted from her 
dissertation. Secular and 
Spiritual Humanism: Louis 
/. Kahn's Work for the Jew- 
ish Communitii in the 1950s 
and 1960s. 

The book is the sbcth tide in 
the Building Studies series 
that offers an in-depth analy- 
sis of a single structure 
through original documents, 
drawings, and critical exami- 



m 



Princeton resident Mary 
Ellen Schott is the new 

librarian at the Christian Sci- 
ence Reading Room, 178 
Nassau Street. She oversees 
the work of a large staff of 
volunteers, and is also a 
Christian Science nurse. 

Ms. Schott moved to the 
area six years ago from 
Chatham. A graduate of Vir- 
ginia Tech, she has a back- 
ground in corporate interior 
design and has worked as a 
lighting design consultant. 
She has recently designed 
window displays for the Read- 
ing Room. 




Mary Ellen Schott 



Dr. Harvey Rothberg 

Continued from Preceding Page 

came off as abrupt, but his heart was always 
in the right place. I was always very proud to 
say I worked for Dr. Rothberg." 

Mr. Doody noted that Dr. Rothberg was a 
"champion of the nursing group. He was 
always an advocate for the registered nurses 
as major care givers, and worked to 
strengthen their role." 

As president of the medical and dental 
staff at the hospital, he was an ex officio 
voting member of the board of trustees and 
helped set policy for the entire institution, 
Mr. Doody explained. 

The hospital administrator also remarked 
that Dr. Rothberg is considered the "unoffi- 
cial historian" of the Medical Center. He is 
the author of two histories of the institution 
— The First Fifty Years, published in 1969, 
and its sequel. The First Seventy-Five 
Years. 

End-of-life Issues 

One of Dr. Rothberg's "wonderful 
points," according to Ms. Kennedy, 
the head nurse, is his ability to talk 
with patients and their families about end-of- 
life issues and to help them realize the risks 
and benefits of technology. 

He is a long-time member of the Medical 
Center's Biomedical Ethics Committee. 
About 10 years ago, he helped write the 
hospital's version of a Living Will, condens- 
ing the state's 12-page version to three 
pages. 

The physician, he explains, must know 
when treatment will no longer truly benefit a 
patient. "1 am impressed by the limitations of 
medical intervention," he says, pointing out 
that chemotherapy may not help a p>atient 
aher a certain point, and that prolonging life 
with the use of a feeding tube may not be 
desirable if the patient has poor quality of 
life. 

The physician needs to seek input from 
family members and from the patient — if he 
or she is capable. Dr. Rothberg says. "The 
doctor should try to give guidance without 
excessive paternalism. 

"Medicine has become more complicated," 
he reflects. "Technologies have been 



developed that were unavailable when I start- 
ed; and the hiture of medicine is exciting, 
especially when you contemplate gene thera- 
py, new diagnostic techniques, and new 
modes of therapy — but unsolved problems 
remain all over the world. 

"In the U.S., we will have to figilre out how 
to modify the system, so that costs can be 
kept reasonable, without creating barriers to 
access, and interference between doctor and 
patient." 

Dr. Rothberg plans to continue some of his 
medical involvement. In retirement, he will 
maintain an active teaching schedule at 
UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson School of 
Medicine, where he is clinical professor of 
medicine. He also plans to continue his par- 
ticipation on the Tumor Board and the Bio- 
medical Ethics Committee; and he will be 
available for consultations. 

He will also, however, have time to pursue 
his interest in art and art history; and, in 
September, he will start work as a volunteer 
docent at the Princeton University Art Muse- 
um. In his letter to patients, he also noted 



The University of Iowa, 
Iowa City, la., awarded 
degrees to Princeton resi- 
dents Noemi Guadalupe De \ 
La Puente and Timothy: 
Michael Douglas, at com- 
mencement ceremonies in 
May. Ms. Dc La Puente 
received an M.F.A. degree in 
theatre arts, while Mr. Dou- 
glas was awarded a B.A. 
degree in communication 
studies. 

Sean A. Lento, Penning- 
ton, received a B.A. degree in 
English, as well. 




t T I Y I ImIiiJi 



'^ y W W W W W W W W W W W W W W w 'W 'W w w ' 



Laura Elena Abate, 

daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Abate, Princeton, 
graduated recently from 
Grove City College, Grove 
City, Pa., with high honors in 
molecular biology and bio- 
chemistry. Ms. Abate was 
awarded a B.S. degree cum 
laude. 



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Area residents who gradu- 
ated in May from Rowan Uni- 
versity, Glassboro, included 
Princeton resident David M. 
Jakobsen, who received a 
degree in musk: education; 
Jordan Conley, Pennington, 
mechanical engineering; and 
Tracy L Secoolish, Hope- 
well, with a degree in 
law/justice. 

Also graduating were Law- 
renceville residents Dana P. 
Brooks, liberal studies; 
Shannon M. Ruefly, com- 
munication; Eric K. Smith, 
law/justice; Shawn D. 
Sodoi, law/justice; and 
Travis B. Vail, communk:a- 
tkxi. 



Enjoy life in 

your own home 

and maintain your 

independence 

Created in the Quaker tradition, Friends Life Care at Home of New Jersey is a not-for-profit 
nonsectarian hfe care program if hat lets you'^continue to hve at home and maintain your 
independence — even if your health should change'" ', 

• This unique and affordable life care plan is for active and 
independent individuals 60 or older. 

• Relieve your loved ones from worrying about your care. 

• Every member is provided with a care coordinator — a 
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• From home health aides to registered nurses, from homemakers 
to home-delivered meals, we make sure you receive all your 
care from the time you join — for your entire lifetime. 

• Friends Life Care at Home o( New Jersey serves Essex, Mercer, 
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Call 1-877-352-2465 for inore infonnation or to 
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Visit our Web site: www.friendslifecareathome.com 



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Life Care At Home' 
of New Jersey 

2 Executive Drive •Suite 420 
Somerset, NJ 08873 



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"He is one of the greatest 
physicians Vve ever had the 
privilege of working with, ** 
said Dr. Ben Wright, one of 
the nine doctors who wel- 
comed Dr. Rothberg to the 
Princeton Medical Group. 

that he looks forward to having more time 
for travel, gardening, golf, and family. 

Family includes his wife, Nancy, and his 
three daughters — of whom he is very proud. 
Elizabeth teaches in the New York City pub- 
lic schools; Marjorie is an architect in Wilm- 
ington, Del.; and daughter Nancy works with 
an Internet firm in New York. 

"There have been many satisfactions in 
being a doctor in Princeton, " Dr. Rothberg 
reflects. "For years I have had the unique 
opportunity of being helpful to many won- 
derful and interesting patients. I am fortunate 
in having selected the right profession and 
the right place in which to practice it." 

— Anne Rivera 



■V>- Bt -.-?*,• 



(M 



in 




iiiiikI ^"^^ mm 

Feng Shui Design 
since 1990 

609|497|4883 



Sleep Sofas 




From 

$599 

Assorted Styles & Fabrics! 

Nassau Interiors 

162 Nassau St. • Pnnceton, NJ 
(609) 924-2561 

Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Thurs 'til 8 
Sat 9-5; Sun 12-4 



GRAVES 
DESIGN 

STUDIO STORE 





■i.^- 



Jefferson (Bath & "Kitcfien 



1 



"Bafh Renovations Our Specialty" 

190 Witherspoon Street, Princeton 
609-924-0762 

Hours: Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-3 




THE PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CHAPEL 



Welcomes you 
to worship 
Sunday, July 9, 
at 10:00 a.m. 



The Rev. Mark Orten 

Chaplain. Westminster Foundation 
Princeton University 




Visif our fJefaii Store at 

338 Nassou Street. Princeton 

THU. FRI SAT I 0am - 5pm 

609 497 6878 



EINSTEIN TIMES TWO: Walter Matthau, who died Saturday at 79, was remem- 
bered warmly by Harriet Drive resident Bob Hearne (you guessed, on the 
right) a computer software designer who spent three months working as the 
actor's double during the Princeton shooting of "I.Q." Walter Matthau played 
Einstein in the 1994 film. Mr. Heame remembered the actor as "a very 
positive person, a very nice person, who at break time would be out with the 
crowd shaking hands and, t ruly, kissing babies." 

WiUard S. Starks, 94, 

of Kingston, died June 29 at 
Princeton Medical Center. 



OBITUARIES 



P^ nj^^^ 




Sympattiy 

Basltets 

and 

Food Platters 



Lovingly Created 
Personally Delivered 



Princeton Shopping Center 

North Harrison Street 

Princeton, NJ 08540 

Tel 609.924.7755 
Fax 609.924.3697 



Anne L. Joy. 95, of 

Loveland, Colo., died June 
22. 

Born in Princeton, she 
moved to Colorado eight 
years ago. 

She was a graduate of 
Princeton High School and 
Trenton Art School and was 
employed for 13 years at 
Princeton University Library. 
She was a member of the 
Princeton Lutheran Church of 
the Messiah. 

Wife of the late Leslie W. 
Joy, and sister of the late Elsa 
L. Hays, she is survived by 
her son, Leslie W. Joy Jr. of 
Berthoud, Colo.; a sister, 
Betty L. Bucholz of Roches- 
ter, N.Y.; and two brothers, 
Jacob B. Lutz of Princeton 
and Col. Cari G. Lutz., Ret., 
of West Hartland, Colo. 

A memorial service was 
held in Loveland. 



Bom in Plainsboro, he was 
a longtime Princeton area 
resident. 

He graduated from 
Princeton High School and 
worked for the Princeton Uni- 
versity Store for 31 years. 



Franklyn H. Barlow 
St., 82, of Princeton, died 
July 1 at the Merwick Unit of 
The Medical Center at 
Princeton. 



He was a member of the 
Kingston Presbyterian Church 
for 70 years. West Windsor 
Keenagers, and Plainsboro 
Senior Citizens. 

He is survived by his wife of 
60 years, Sybil Bariow; two 
sons, Leroy of Hamilton and 
Franklyn H. Jr. of 
Remington; a daughter, Sybil 
Luden of Hamilton; a brother, 
Lester of Richmond, Va.; 
seven grandchildren; and 
seven great-grandchildren. 

Funeral will be Wednesday 
at 10 a.m. at A.S. Cole 
Funeral Home, Cranbury. 
Burial will follow in 
Westminster Cemetery, 
Cranbury. 

Memorial contributions may 
be made to the Hospice 
Foundation at The Medical 
Center at Princeton, Depart- 
ment of Home Care, 253 
Witherspoon Street, Prince- 
ton 08540; or Kingston Pres- 
byterian Church, 4565 
Route 27. P.O. Box 148, 
Kingston 08528. 



He was bom in Chatham, 
N.Y., graduated from 
Harvard in 1927, and com- 
pleted drama studies at Yale 
University. Over the next ten 
years he had three plays pro- 
duced in New York. He 
moved to Princeton in 1936. 

During WoHd War II he 
served in the Southwest 
Pacific as a naval photogra- 
pher. After the war he started 
a photographic business in 
Princeton serving the special- 
ized needs of the Department 
of Geology and the Library of 
Princeton University. He was 
a member of Springdale Golf 
Club. 



Brian Gage 

ANTIQUES 



APPRAISALS • ESTATE FURNITURE 
DECORATIONS * WHIMSY • ANTIQUES 

Always interested in purchasing: 

Furniture • Paintings • Silver 

Oriental Rugs • Unusual Items 

Fair Prices Offered 
33 W. Broad St, Hopewell 
Thursday-Sunday 11-5 or by app't j__. 
609-466-1722 • 609-466-3166 | r 



f^ssport A^ti^^vjJ^ 



He is survived by his wife, 
Jean Angas Starks; a daugh- 
ter Cornelia; a son, Elliott; 
and a grandson, all of Glouc- 
estershire, England. 

Friends are invited to join 
the family at home, 18 
Heathcotc Road, Kingston, 
on Saturday, July 8 from 4 to 
6 p.m. 

In lieu of flowers, memorial 
contributions may be made to 
the Medical Center at 
Princeton, 253 Witherspoon 
Street, Princeton 08540. 





TEN THOUSAND 

VILLAGES. 



SATURDAY, |ULY 8, 10-3 

Meet Bumanang Peter Vusas from 
Cameroon. Learn how instruments 
are made and play along with local 
drummers as they demonstrate 
rhythms from around the world! 



Princeton Shopping Center 
301 N. Harrison St. 
Princeton, N| 
Men -Wed 10-6 
Thu-Fri 10-8, Sat 10-6 



J U Q> VS 



Shu I' /96.S 



' SYMPATHY FI.OWKKS... 
An expression of love 

(609) 924 9340 • 360 Nassau St. Princeton 




KIDS! 

|oin our 
Summer 
Cultural 
Program 



IVe^Ve^ 



BROKEN GROUND 



to sert/^ 
voc^ better! 



.^-»J^ M 



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Paint perks up your 
home...and protects! 

We clean out gutters, do repairs, powerwash 

to remove mildew, putty the windows, 

caulk the cracks, for longer-lasting 

protection and beauty 

for your home! 

"mf^^Prolessional Painting Pays!... In many ways" 
H I a Princeton business for over 40 years gm^m 

* I Call 609-924-1474 ^ 

^JULIUS H, GROSS 



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Princeton 

Nursing Home & Rehabilitation Center 



We are proud to 



announce the start of our 



new, state-of-tfie- art. 



65.000 sq. ft facility on 



Bunn Drive. Princeton. 



Our address will 



mOHtr: 

• Home- Uke Atmosphere 

• Same Day Admission 

• Open 7 dayt A >yeek 

• Physiatrist Directed Team - PT, ST. OT 

• Wound Management Pro-am 

• Sbon-Term Recfitte Care 

60»«4-8000 

F«x:M»«n-2451 



> Medicare and Medicaid Certified 

• Cardiac Recovery • Caae Manaltement 

• Hoapice Care • Intravenous Therapy 

• Rehabilitation Proi^ram - 7 Days A Week 

• FuU Recreation «nd Cntertalnmem Program 

• Religious Services 

' OfMhlm Mttalonla, Adminiatrator 
' l*Bt C tl l or > M o. Admitgion* Director 



cfiange. but our 



commitment to people 



is stronger than ever 




JAMES 

IRISH TREE EXPERTS 

• Shade tree pruning and trimming 

• Tree and stump removal 

• Tree fertilizing 

• Quality service & good prices 



REAL ESTATE 
Transactions 



924-3470 



N J. Certified Expert No. 301 



r 



Allan Smith 
Cabinetmaker 

custom furniture & cabinetwork 



V 



(6U9) 466-1595 



(609) 737-2905 (home) 



I 
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SKILLMAN FURNITURE 1 

Largest Selection of Used Furniture | 



in Central New Jersey 
Find it tiere first! 

SPECIALS OF THE WEEK: 

Mahogany Drop Leaf Table; 
4'x7' Solid Cherry Table. 

212 Alexander St.. Princeton 
Mon-Fri 9-5, Sat 9- 1 924- 1 88 1 



JULIUS SESZTAK 
BUILDER 

• Additions • Restorations (^ 

• Renovations • No Job Too Sma!' 

FREE ESTIMATES 
(609) 466-0732 

S 4t H Excellent References 




^Siitlernianf- 

^^ter than a falling leaf... 
The Solution to a 
Drippy Situation. 

. 92 1-229 9 . 



PRINCETON 

The properties listed below are not nec- 
essarily in Pnnceton Borougti or Tom- 
stiip but have Princeton mailing 
addresses. 

91 CASTLETON ROAD, Elmer J Badin 
. Sold to Alan Furness $225,000 

4 ESSEX COURT. Scott M. & Sandra 
Lilhs Sold to M& Alia Kilstitok 

$264,000 
255 SAYRE DRIVE, Helmut & Elly E 
Brtinar Sold to Vladimir & Diana 
Stetsovsky $217,000 

275 SAYRE DRIVE. Robert M Krug 
Sold to Ed Freeman. $364,000 

36B NEEOHAM WAY, Astrid Fatimy 
Sold to Jennifer & Grob D. Paetzold 

$162,000 
41 RUTGERS LANE. Steven T & Nadine 
M. Haase Sold to Gregory K & Adn- 
enneCaltioun $285,000 

44F WATERTOWN COURT, Anttiony 
Kotsinis Sold to Toby Desperak 

$186,000 
76 SAYRE DRIVE. Edward & Carol S 
Etirenberg. Sold to John D. & Stiaron L 
Sweet $278,000 

I DOGWOOD LANE, Jonathan F & 
Maureen T Conant Sold to Maryann 
Selander $185,000 
170 BROOKS BEND, Ruzica A Luton 
Sold to Peter Eisenberger $950,000 
30 WESTCOTT ROAD. Jacques & 
Rachel Dessailly. Sold to Bruce N & 
Hayashi S Robinson $515,000 
24 OORANN AVENUE. Lois R Herbert 
Sold to Kathleen Crawlord $204,000 
84 CUYLER ROAD, Florence & Felicia A 
Oavis Sold to Cynthia Hedricks 

$171,000 
9 MORRIS DRIVE, Hopewell Hunt LP 
Sold to Mark F & Sharon Altmeyer 

$604,460 

HOPEWELL 
67 NORTH GREENWOOD AVENUE. Jet- 
trey & Mary Miller. Sold to Diana 
Morgan $155,000 

PENNINGTON 
118 EAST DEUWARE AVENUE. Tho- 
mas J. Adier Sold to William W & Judy 
Porch $350,500 

1630 REED ROAD. Jesse S & Lydia 
Branhfim Sold to Gregory M. & Chris- 
' tine Perkins $160,000 

45 NORTH MAIN STREET, Thomas W 
Maloney. Sold to Eric J. & Leeann 
Holtermann $194,000 

II WEST DELAWARE AVENUE. Joseph 
J & Dorothy Dutko. Sold to M Stevens 

$215,000 



SKILLMAN 
9 STONE MOUNTAIN COURT. OKM 

Residential Properties Sold to Robert F 
& Carol L Lande $471,570 

95 BEOENS BROOK ROAD, Louise P & 
Rosemane Scibetta Sold to David C & 
Martha A Webb $740,000 

136 FAIRVIEW ROAD. Ronals B & 
Maryann Perlman Sold to Glenn & Jill 
Abrahamsen $340,000 

23 BETHPAGE DRIVE. OKM Residential 
Properties. Sold to Janet Jannoni 

$365,930 
11 MAIDSTONE COURT. DKM Residen 
tial Properties Sold to Ronald R & 
MarvK Larson $511,390 

19 BETHPAGE DRIVE. DKM Residential 
Properties Sold to Susan Olson 

$43,090 



PRINCETON JUNCTION 
10 SPARROW DRIVE. Calton Homes 
Inc Sold to Narendra K & Sushma 
Sinha $478,330 

2 PUTNAM COURT. Timothy G & Maria 
Tantum Sold to Patrick & Donna 
Brocker $324,000 

20 NEWPORT DRIVE. Kenneth D & 
TerrI Welch Sold to Shawn D & 
Danielle Sieler $610,000 

16 scon AVENUE. Viola E Aversano 
Sold to Constantin Neagu $141,000 
19 SAPPHIRE DRIVE. Thomas K & 
Cheryle Boyle Sold to Michael & Demse 
Motola $360,000 

2 MONROE DRIVE. Khosrow Hadavi 
Sold to Xiao X & Meiyi Pan $356,000 
55 CONEFLOWER LANE. Drive Horton 
Inc. Sold to Bernard & Charlotte 
Schemer $207,590 

4 REVERE COURT. Nirmalya & Saroi 
Chatteriee. Sold to Ye & Cheng H 
Wang $447,000 

604 VILLAGE ROAD WEST, Robert & 
Judith Novack Sold to Jacqueline 
Deschamps $245,000 

73 HONEYFLOWER LANE. SGS Com 
munities Sold to Rohitkumar N & Var- 
sha Desai $256,860 



LAWRENCEVILLE 
11 JASMINE COURT, Michael T & Jes- 
sica A. Smith Sold to Kelly Kramli 

$117,500 
14 PAGODA COURT. Society Hill at 
Lawrenceville Sold to Maureen 
Lancaster $120,000 

4 STONEY CREEK PLACE. Charles W & 
Bernadette Morten Sold to William J & 
Eliza W Whittaker $412,000 



^KOOUB's 

*• CONSTRUCTION 

Home Improvements 

924-6777 

Remodelmg • Renovations • Small jobs 

Additions • Woodworking • Decks 

Flooring • Design • Ceramic Tile 

FREE ESTIMATES » RT. 206, PRINCETON . 




tht^ >y t <i rt »t«' 



Lang's KiTCnBliWifATH 

202 1 Nottingham Way, Mercerville. NJ 
1.800.627.5997 




Elec. Cent. Lie. #6651 
Eiec. Inspector Lie. #2828 
Fire Inspector Lie. #2828 
SuDcode Official Lie. #2828 



RESIDENTIAL 

COMMERCIAL 

HOME INSPECTIONS 

RENOVATIONS 



GEORGE JOHNSON 8 SON 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

Serving Princeton for over 25 Years 



(609) 921-9288 or 921 -WATT 

1-800-303-9288 



^--^'vfr.]\ii3E5£5 



Princeton, NJ 




AVAILABLE NOW! 



MONSW 

EVE CARL 

"Dedicated to Quality and Service" 




l)r M.iry !• Bonome 
Opfitnjririt Phy\u iiin 



BeneclicI A fa/iii 
Di\i>fn\inii r>/>r/f utn 



FAMILY EYE CARE * QUALITY EYE WEAR 

Montgomery Center near Shop Rite 
1325 Route 206 Suite 24 
Skillman, New Jersey 08558 
609-279-0005 • 800-860-1320 S • 



I / TUES1Z-8 

HAIR CUTTERS ^^^'^ 

10 Moore Street • 609-9S4-6696 






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yVlLKINSON 

INTERIORS 

-1 



uriu 

ANTIQUES 



neipl^ arrived 

antiques 

and accessories 



; 20 Nassau Street • Princeton 
Wed-Sat 12-4 or by app't • 609-252-9010 



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^corn q Cen 

^Bt ^^ AssisTEt) Living y^RtsiutNCt 

Princeton's First 



Discover the DifTerence 

When >i)u arc lix)king lui asMsicd Imng. 

II shoulJ Yk as inJi\ idual as 

cacti pcrsun is unique 

A serene and nadiral en\ irtmmenl 

in a lusliis uiKHJcd selling — enclosed 

icrracc (>veil>K>kin)! a Mimint: riK'k and 

bi»uUler stream -- aftem(H>n tea riK>m — 

Bisiri) — whirlpool hath — solarium 

I'lnc dining -~ cultural — soci.i 
opportunities 

Concierge service — hnusekeepint: - 

linen service -- vvcllness programs -- 

enhanced supportive sen ices — oiilv 

when you need Ihem 

Distinctive assisted In inp -- lh.irs ihe 




Acorn Glen Difference! 



Sow taking reservations - Millennium ()peninf> 



r 



J Please send a free brochure 

Name. 



Street Address:. 
Cily/Stale/Zip:_ 
Phone; 



^ 



4mn(M 609/252-0802 7r^„ZoT^!^''^l 



Professional Managemeni Dy Grace Managemeni Inc 



©-4 



tUIObGPGenesis® Series 
Gas Barbecues 

Enougt) features to satisfy ttie most 
discriminating bart)ecuer 

•Efficient 36,000 
BTU per hour inpi 
provides 550°F, 
witfiout wasting gi 

•635 sq. in. of 
total cooking area 

•Three individually 
controlled stain- 
less steel burners 

•Exclusive Wetjer 
Ravorizer' 
System virtually 
eliminates flare-ups 

10- Year limited warranty 



BOWDEN'S 

FIRESIDE HEARTH & HOME 

since T 30^ 

Specializing in Natural Gas Grills 
609-5BB-33aa 

1731 Nottingham Way, Rt. 33, Hamilton Twp. 
(Exit 63 off Rt 295) • Tues-Sat 10-5, Thurs til 8 



^ 




Free Assembly 



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FOR RENT, PRINCETON 2 room 
studio artarigemenl m beautiful 
house One block to Palmer Square 
Walk everywhere Large bedroom/ 
living area, hardwood floors, wood 
slove. private entrance, cable TV 
Second room office/study Kitchen 
and laundry privileges Female pre- 
ferred Available July 15 $735 a 
rnonlhXall 688-0690 

MOVING SALE 106 Dempsey 
Avenue, Princeton Township, Satur- 
day July 8th, 8 am-1pm Sporting 
goods, children's clothes, toys, 
books, picnic table, tall men s sizes, 
athletic shoes Ram dale Sunday 

QARAOE SALE Great stuff, small 
lurniture pieces, bric-abrac, clothes, 
crib, toys collectibles, and more Fri- 
day and Saturday 8 to 4, July 7 and 
8 Ram or shine 123 John Street. 
Pnnceton, 

HOUSE FOR RENT on 206, Princ 
eton Township, corner Cherry Valley 
Rd , 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, yard, 
woods, and brook $1.500/nno plus 
security and utilities Available Aug 1 
921-9179 6-28-21 

PRIVATE TUTORINO English, 
math, and reading NJ certified teach- 
er Specialist in basic skills By 
appointment. 737-8598 6-28-21 

SUMMER SPORTS JACKETS 

and blazers sizes 40. 42, 44. and 
45/46, (Ralph Lauren. Brooks Broth- 
ers. Paul Stewart. Saks Fifth Ave,. 
Barneys, etc ) Linen, silk, light weight 
worsted wool and a few 100% cash- 
mere lackets, excellent condition, 
sacrifice $35 each (values up to 
$550). 921-7511 6-28-21 

HOUSE TO SHARE Female 
wanted (ages 20-30) to share home 
with same in Rodky Hill Huge back 
yard with deck overlooking canal 
$450/month ■^ 1 month security Avail- 
able August Isl Call 695-9855 or 
430-9745 and leave message. 
6-28-21 



BARN AND YARD SALE Sunday 
July 9 from 9-12, no earlybirds' 
Household items, furniture, lighting 
antiques fans, pet supplies, toys, and 
more 40 N Mam Street, Pennington, 
NJ 

DO YOU NEED HELP with a book, 
special letter, article, brochure. Inter- 
net Web site' Consultation and edit- 
ing provided Phone (609) 844-0204 
or e-mail: davischapelOyahoo, 
com 7-5-241 

FLOOR SANDING, STAINING 
A REFINISHING 

Hardwood Floors Installed 

•EST FLOOR CO. 
924-4897 



D.L.N. CONSTRUCTION: Multi 

national construction experience for 
34 years, fvlew construction, addi- 
tions, rertiodeling and repair Bath- 
rooms, kitchens, decks, patios, 
porches, etc Fast service. Fully 
insured 609- 924-2684 If 



SEWING: SLIPCOVERS, CUR- 
TAINS, cushions and other home 
furnishings Fancy or plain, frivolous 
or functional Miranda Short, 
921-1908 tf 



JOE'S LANDSCAPE, INC.: All 

phases of spnng cleanup, shrub 
pruning, fertilizing, weed control, leaf 
cleanup, lawn cutting. Also, rotolillmg 
Call anytime. (609) 9240310, leave 
message tf 



WINDOWS A STORM WIN- 
DOWS: Inside & out. $6 each win- 
dow Carpet. upfK)lstery. wall, panel 
and bathroom Complete home clean- 
ing Fully insured All work guaran- 
teed 393-2122 tf 



WBIONT LOSS 

Holistic, gentle approach for 
mind/body strategies to lose weight 
with ease and peace 
Judy, (609)520-0720 7 S 4 1 



FOXvROACH 



Princeton Sales Office 

166 Nassau St., Princeton, NJ 

609-924-1600 



IS THERE LIFE beyond Princeton"? 
Check out WWW pnncetoninfo com 
tor places to go, things to do. dining 
destinations throughout Central New 
Jersey 



SUSAN CLARKE: Wallpapering, 
stencilling, interior painting and wall 
glazing 10 years experience Refer- 
ences gladly provided Call (609) 
397-2444 tf 



VINTAGE COTTAGE furniture - 
colorful bureaus, china closets, 
desks, mirrors, beds armotres. vani- 
ties Custom painted at Birds of a 
Feather (609) 683-55 14 

VACATION IN PROVENCE: 3 

bedroom house fenced garden, ter- 
race, shared pool and tennis, golf 
nearby En|oy the ambiance, walk to 
village for croissants and coffee 
( 609)683-1640. If 

TUTOR/COUNSELOR 

Reading, writing, math, special ed 

and siralegies-self esteem 

Certified U of Pa 

25 years experience 

Judy, (609)520-0720 7-5 41 



A CHILD'S ROOM filled with cotof- 
ful furniture, painting on the walls, vin- 
tage lamps and bedspreads. A warm 
safe haven for a child of any age 
Interior design and painted furniture 
by Birds of a Feather (609) 683-5514 



FOR ALL YOUR HOME improve 
ment needs basements, bathrooms, 
ceramic tiles, kitchens, and painting 
Please call Al for a free estimate at 
(732)438^905 6-7-121 

KINGSTON MINI-ESTATBl 5 

tMdroom, 4-bath ranch on cul-de- 
sac, au pair area, two dens, 1,5 
acres, indoof pool, tennis court, full 
basement Convenient to bus Call 
(609)924-8813 5-3-81 

FOAM CUT TO ANY SIZK: Cush 
ions, mattresses, boats, campers 
Capital Bedding. 1-800-244-9605 for 
quote H 




CERAMIC TILE installation Walls. 
Iioors backsplashes. repair work and 
regrouting 20 years expsenence Fully 
insured John Groch (908)996-6596 

TENNIS COACH seeks room in 
Princeton lor daytime home office use 
in exchange lor house sitting, swim- 
ming pool care 497-3918 6-21-41 

CERTIFIED HOME HEALTH 

aide, caie tor the elderly Live m or 
out Flexible hours 637-0954 7-5-41 

LOT FOR SALE Hopewell Town- 
ship 4 acres 3 minutes 10 Borough 
septic system design, approved lor 4 
bedroom house well road 10 building 
site, no brokers please $195,000 
(609)252-1114 7-5-41 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS from 

roofs to cabinets Carpentry and 
nnasonry repairs, large or small Call 
J 31924-1475. here since 1958, tfc 

MEMORABLE WEDDING gifts 

Custom painted vases, champagne/ 
wine glasses, covered cake dishes, 
mirrors, picture frames, chairs, bird- 
houses, mailboxes Birds of a Feather 
(609)683-5514 





Gloria Nilson M^ Realtors 

33 Wilherspoon Street. Princeton. NJ 08542 

Of all the decisions 
you 11 face when haying 
or selling a home, 
there is none more 
important than the 
person you choose 
to represent you . 



Oneof ifie Lcjding 
Sales AssiKialcs 

DOROTHY BRODKA 
609-921-2600, X 1 28 



Choose carefully. 
Dorothy 

609-921-2600, 



x128 



DAN NOVACOVICI-ELECTRI- 
CAL CONTRACTOR: Complete 

residential, commercial/industrial wir- 
ing services New services, outlets, 
lighting, alarm systems etc Bonded 
fully insured License No 8179 
609-924-2684 tf 



ODD JOBS Interior, exterior paint- 
ing Spacklmg. small repairs Call 
Petes Handyman Service, (609)466- 
5785 75-4t 



PRINCETON LAWN SERVICE 

We mow lawns, etc , 
(609)921-8440 • (732)297-2911 



LEATHER FLIGHT JACKET 

men s size 42 deluxe U S Air force 
type, all-year-round leather flight 
lacket with zip-out plush lining, also 
referred to as a "Bomber Jacket, 
new condition, sacrifice $75 O B O 
($425 value) 921-7511 




Large elegant duplex in Riverside. Walk to town and University. 
Designer kitchen, magnificent garden with brick terrace. Oversized 
living/dining room with buill-ins, fireplace and new maple floors. 
Healed front porch. Large finished attic. High ceilings. Princeton 
Borough. $360,000 



Beautiful Princeton Walk Townhouse. Light, airy, spacious 
with 3 bedrooms, 2'/: baths, living room, dining room, and 
family room with fireplace. Large finished lower level with 
light Berber wall-to-wall carpet. 1 car garage, cul-de-sac. Rec 
Center with swimming pools, tennis courts and play area. 
South Brunswick - Princeton address. A great buy 
at $286,900 



5,000 sq. ft. of living space. A very special place. Wonderful 
views from every window. A delightful stream adds to the 
total ambience. Living room with stone fireplace and cathedral 
ceiling, dining room with stone fireplace, eat-in kitchen. Fan- 
tastic master suite - bedroom, living room with wood stove, 
dressing room and bath, studio or exercise room or office. 
Separate wing with four bedrooms, high ceilings and two full 
baths and playroom or studio. Princeton. Priced at $774,000 



http:\\PrincetonCrossroads.REALTOR.com 



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342 Nassau Street (Corner Harrison) • Princeton • Realtor 

609-924-4677 




RETAIL SPACE 

PRINCETON ARMS CENTER - 

1700 sq. ft. • 2.000 sq. ft. • 6.000 sq. ft. 

(2.000 and 6.000 contiguous) 

Old Trenton Rd. & Dorchester Dr„ West Windsor. N.J, 

KUSER PLAZA - 

6.560sq. ft. • 1.300 sq.ft. 

Kuser & Whitehorse-Mercerville Rd.. Hamilton, N.J. 

MONTGOMERY SHOPPING CENTER - 

2,928 sq. ft., available immediately 
2.610 sq. ft., available Sept. 1. 2000 
Route 206 & 518. Skillman. N.J. 

PENNINGTON SHOPPING CENTER - 

2.000 sq. ft. available 

Rt. 31 & W. Delaware Ave., Pennington. N.J. 

CaU Kark Hill or Jon Brush. 921-6060 



HILTON REALTY CO. 
of Princeton 

Commercial, Industrial & Land 

194 NASSAU STREET. PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08542 



OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE 



WINDSOR BUSINESS PARK 

196 Princeton Hightstown Road (Rt. 571) opposite Windsor Community Park 




• Suites from 1,500 sq. ft. to 
12,000 sq. ft. 

• Elevator 

• Basement Storage 

• Equidistant to Rt. 1 & 
"New" Hightstown Bypass 



BRAND NEW 24.000 SQ. FT. OFFICE BUILDING 



• 24 Hour-a-Day; 
7-Day-a-Week Access 

• Individual HVAC Control 

• Ample ft Well Lit Parking 

• Good Access to Rts. 1, 95. 
130, N.J. Turnpike 



• Pre-leasing 

• Available 3rd quarter. 2000. 
Call for details. 

• Brokers protected 

• Ask for Mark Hill or 
Jon Brush 



HILTON REALTY CO. of Princeton 



Commercial, Industrial Si Land 

194 NASSAU STREET. 
PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08542 



CALL FOR DETAILS 

921-6060 

Mark Hill or Jon Brush 



MUVATS LANOUAOK LStSONS 

at a Princetoo Caf6 of your choice 
English as a second language or Ger- 
man Also translations and video con- 
versions Please call (609) 
683-4526 5-10-9t 

HOUSE WANTID TO MNT 

Family seeks 3-4 tjedroom house in 
Princeton 1 year lease minimum 
Needed by mid-July/August. Please 
call (609) 683-0447 7-5-5t 

CLEANINO. IRONINO, Laundry 
by Polish women with a lot of experi- 
ence, excellent references and own 
transportation Please call Inga (609) 
530- 1 169. leave mes- sage 6-14-41 

HOUSE FOR RENT Princeton 
Township. 3 laedrooms, 2 baths Pre- 
terrably 2-year rental $1,750 + utili- 
ties, available Sept 1. Nov 1. Cape 
Cod on Vt acre lot. close to shopping, 
schools. 1 mile PU (609) 683-_4494 
6-21-41 

FOR COMPLETE YARD MAIN- 
TENANCE call Raffaele Carnevale 
(609)924-3032 It 



OFFICE EQUIPMENT 



USED 
OFFICE FURNITURE 

CLEARANCE 



694 S. Broad St., Trenton 

921-1415; 392-5166 

visa - mastercharge 



FOR SALE BY OWNER: 

Townhouse in Princeton landing End 
unit. 3 bedrooms upstairs with 1 full 
bath. 1 half bath f^aster bedroom 
and bath downstairs, powder room, 
large living room with fireplace, dining 
room, kitchen with new appliances. 
Large deck overlooking Williamsburg 
garden, hardwood floors downstairs, 
new carpet upstairs Newly painted 
Full basement Pool, tennis 
$260.000 (609) 720-0705. 7-5-2t 

IMS DODOE STRATUS: 70K 

excellent condition, loaded. 4 door 
l^/loving. must sell $7,500 or best 
offer (609)430-0812. 7-5-21 

ROOM FOR RENT: Furnished, qui- 
et, sate. & clean Five minutes to Prin- 
ceton House privileges $550 p)er ' 
month (609)430-0612 7-5- 2f 

PARIS, FRANCE: Elegant apart- 
ment for rent, just off the Seine, in the 
6th Arrondlssement (Latin Quarter) 
Five minute walk to the Louvre. Notre 
Dame, etc Rent by the week or 
rrxDnlh (609)924-4332 

DISC JOCKEY For all occasions 
Lighting, smoke, bubbles We make 
the life of the party! Call (908) 359- 
9190 6-21-41 

PRINCETON Suite of rooms. 3 
miles from downtown. Country set- 
ting, (smoke-, pet-free, private bath, 
kitchen, piano privileges) in exchange 
for utilities, water, etc . and t>eing 
mothers helper willing to drive two 
girls before (7:15 a m ) or after (5 30 
p m ) school as needed Female only 
References required (609) 419-3747. 
6-21-4t 

WE BUY USED BOOKS: All sub 

lects but pay better for literature, his- 
tory, art. architecture, children's and 
philosophy Good condition a must 
Call Micawber Books 110-114 Nas- 
sau Street . Princeton 92 1 -8454 tfc 




NURSERY & LANDSCAPE CO. 

Route 31 & Yard Rd.. Pennington. N.J. • 609-737-7644 
www.stonybrookgardens.com 

LANDSCAPE INSTALLATION SERVICE 

Monday through Saturday 9-5:00; Sunday 10-4 



NCOTUJVVER 



i 



CLEANERS 

We pick-up 
and deliver 



924-5144 • Open Sunday 
55 State Road (Rt. 206) Princeton 




REAL ESTATE 
AND YOU 

By Tod Peyton 



GET RICH QUICK WITH 
INVESTMENT REAL ESTATE 

You see them on cable TV. sitting around a swimming 
pool, sharing stories about how they got rich quick by 
buying valuable real estate for give-away prices. They took 
a course on how to invest in real estate and become mil- 
lionaires overnight — with nothing down and no credit 
hassles from mortgage lenders. The course woriced for 
them, and they say it will work for you, too. 

If all this sounds too good to be true — it is! These "get- 
rich-quick" courses and schemes are being investigated by 
consumer fraud agencies around the country. This does not 
mean that you can't become a millionaire by investing in 
real estate. But investing in real estate requires one impor- 
tant thing from you — an investment of cash. You can't 
build an empire overnight, but you can do very well over 
the long term by selecting property in a good location that 
is priced well, and which can provide a reasonable cash 
flow. 

For dependable, individual advice on buying or selling 
real estate, call Tod Peyton, Realtor or any Peyton 
Associate at 921-1550. Feel free to stop by my office at 
343 Nassau Street in Princeton. 

343 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 
609-921-1550 



COLORFUL ■NOAOKMCNT gifts | 
Custom painted two-drawer boxes ' 
with distinctive, fun or charming origi- 1 
nal designs Birds of a Feather (609) , 
683-5514 I 

i 

AIRPORT SKRVICIi Reliable, 
affordable car service to all airports, 
train stations. NYC. etc Fully licensed 
and insured Independently operated 
for 10 years Call Attache LinnoJ 
924-7029 tf' 



CARNEQIC LAKE/ Canal house 
for sale: Hopewill Builders offering 
beautiful new house overlooking the 
canal/lake in the village of Kingston ' 
Surrounded by preserved land Get it 
before it is listed and the secret is out 
Almost done building 4 bedroom, 2% 
bath fxxjse with many nice features 
Drive by 1 Basin Street. Kingston 
Directions: Route 27 to Kingston 
Garage, right on Academy (turns into 
Mapleton Road), second little street 
on the right is Basin Last house on 
the left, look for the info tx)x on the 
sign Must see to appreciate 
$392,000 Builder also able to bjild 
your dream tiouse or addition (609) 
737-6777 6-21-41 

RKCORDINO STUDIO in area' 
Albums, demos, advertising, audio 
books, tape clarification, kareoke, 24- 
track 2' analog, and digital facility 
Friendly and dedicated service for 1 5 
years Skyiab Studio Gift Certificates 
443-4644 It 

CAPITAL BCDDINO'S MAT- 
TRESS EXPRESS with daily deliv- 
eries to Princeton area Featuring 
Sealy, Serta, Spring Air, Therapedic. 
all sizes, also custom sizes made to 
order — free delivery and free remov- 
al Visit us at 56 US Hwy 130. Bor den- 
town, or 1951 Rte 33, Hamilton 
Square Call 1-800-244-9605 for 
quote tf 



RESPONSIBLE COUPLE in late 
30s, seminary grads. seek minimum 
one year housesitting in/around Princ- 
eton (beginning this fall Experienced 
gardeners References available Will 
consider reduced rent (212) 
316-4245 6-28-21 

HOUSECLEANINO Experience, 
references, available everyday Own 
transportation Call Ana. (609)658- 
3794 6-28-21 

ROOM FOR RENT Large bed- 
room in spacious Victorian to share 
with professionals Convenient loca- 
tion in Hightstown Large yard with 
parking Available now $450 month * 
utilities Call Karen, 371-3628 6-28-21 



^ LDH 

Printing 
Unlimited, Inc. 



Complete Printing Services 



609-924-4664 

Research Park • 417 Wall Sl 

Princeton, NJ 08540 

(Rt. 206 North 

across from Princeioti Airport) 



coLouieix 

BAMtVZRa 




Susan Gordon 



COLOWELL BANKER 

10 NASSAU ST., PRINCETON, NJ 08542 
609-921-1411, x122 

• NJ uduli community resuun;e guide 

• National and Iniemaliunal client experience 

• Complete inlerncl/wet)site/and e-mail access 

• Personal, conndeniial service 

lAtg on li) pnncclunrealeslate.nel or >usji;(>f JCyaol cwii 
lor all yiiur real Ctlate needs' 

20 yean of experience helping buy en and 
sellers make good real estate decisions... 

SUSAN GORDON 
609-921-1411 xl22 

A Top producing and award winning 
Princeton agcnl for more ihan iwrnly years! 



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BEAUTIFUL VICTORIAN STYLE COLONIAL 
IN HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP 




A quiet secluded setting in a cul-de-sac in a lovely established neighborhood 
with a small number of custom homes. This lovely home has vinyl siding for 
carefree exterior, wraparound porch, pool with redwood deck, cabana, mas- 
ter bath featuring Jacuzzi, separate shower and skylight. Other features 
include hardwood floors on first floor, fireplace and skylights in family 
room, sunroom, library and much more. $539,900 

Call Esther 609-737-2063 




ESTHER CAPOTOSTA 

RE/MAX of Greater Princeton 

Princeton Forrestal Village 
112 Village Blvd. • P.O. Box 430 

Plainsboro, NJ 08536 ^i^ 

(609) 951-8600 • (732) 297-4940 ^ - 
Fax (609) 951-9695 

liach Office Independently Owned and Operated 




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New^ Listing 





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Screened by trees and shrubs... 
In a country-like setting 




N.tCallaway^ 

Real Estate Brokar.L l c ^^ 



Four Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 
Web site at http://www.ntcallaway.com 



txtlm*i9t Alfttimtt of 



609-921-1050 spi!^^ 



A deep yard at the front and an 
even deeper one al the back 
allows this charming Cape Cod 
to be the center of attention on 
its 1+ acre lot. The shellered 
front door opens ti) the foyer 
with hardwood tlcxir which 
continues throughout the rest of 
the house. The living r(X)m. 
with crown molding, opens to 
the formal dining room, with 
chair-rail. A welcoming family 
room has a brick raised hearth 
comer fireplace and sliding 
glass doors to the fenced back 
yard. The cheerful eat-in 
kitchen has white cabinetry. 
Nearby, the laundry/mudroom 
and powder room. The master 
bedroom with dressing area, 
and master bath complete this 
floor. On the second floor, three 
bedrooms and a hall bath. In 
Lawrence Township - and just 
minutes to the center of 
Princeton. $359,900 



^ANTIQUC CHANDeum* wilh 
Drass and hanging crystals, newty 
§ rewired These feature the kind o( old 
o world charm that you no longer see 
•^ today Birds of a Feather 



lO 



,-683-5614 



(609) 



a-ANTIQUIS TODAY." Furniture 
repaired and refimshed, using old 
^ woods and old tools We match and 
Q patch We also buy and sell American 
g9 country antiques. Calf Betty or H4artln 
X Reynolds. 298-7731. M9-26t 

^ RENT-BUY PRINCETON Remod 

» elcd ranch on 3/4 acres, in Littlebrook 
^ area. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, living 
^ room, dining room, family room, den 
. laundry 2 car garage Great location 
g $g650J6 09)92 1 -2345 6-2 1 -41 

£ FRENCH BA QUALIFIED and 

g ESL Inieinaiional qualification 
2 teacher of French. Spanish and 
0. English as a second language Pri- 
- vate lessons or small groups Please 
y £g;[Annie^aM609) 716 7 032 6-21 -4t 

O FREDRICK CLEANING Service 
►- Experienced in residential, commer- 
* cial and construction cleaning Aparl- 
g menis, condos, houses, offices 19 
►_ years experience We have excellent 
references. Call us today and get a 
free esiimale Discount on first clean- 
ing We offer low rates which include 
cleaning supplies Money back guar- 
antee Call anytime Madel (609) 396- 
^^^ 6-21-4t 



BEAUTIFUL FOXHOUND MIX 

dog desperate lor good home Found 
at Trenton tram station 10-12 months 
old, male. 45 lbs (full grown), house- 
broken, all shots, to be neutered in 
immediate future Wonderful family 
dog. great with all other animals. 
Heartbroken to give hime up Please 
help him and love him Call Karen at 
work (212)872-5594 

WANTED: GUNS, SWORDS. 

military items Licensed dealer will 
pay more Call Bert (732) 
821-4949 ,(c 



FOR SALE: Entire contents of 
home Furniture, queen mattress 
household appliances and decorative 
items Call 895-9855 or 430-9745 and 
leave message 6-28-2t 

FOR SALE: Indian AuOusson rug in 
perfect condition 14x16' Sublle, 
muted cq/ors $1200 Call (609) 924- 
0288 for appointment 

SEARS LAWN TRACTOR for 

sale. 12 5 HP. 5 speed, 38" mower, 
needs a new starter $250 or best 
offer Call 252-1292 and leave 
message 



CARPENTRY Renovations, addi- 
tions, decks, tilework, windows & 
doors, flooring, fences. Irimwork 
buillins, etc. (Yes. I can do thafi) Call 
(908) 359-9190 6-21-41 

RELIABLE, PUNCTUAL hard- 
working individual will clean your 
house or babysit your kids Call (732) 
422-3270 Ask fof Wendy (Has own 
transpoftatioo.) 6-21-31 

LONG BEACH ISLAND NJ for 

weekly rentals, a raised ranch, 6 
houses from the ocean and 4 houses 
from the bay. with 2 decks (mam & 
upper with view of both ocean and 
bay), a large living area. 4 bedrooms, 
family room and three bathrooms 
(sleeps 10) (609)924-0128 6-2l-3t 

CATERING for smail to midsize 
parties Personal service and reason- 
able prices Call Chris Otis at Good 
Cookin (609) 921-7333 for a menu 
and mofe infomiation. 7- 5-4t 

FEMALE SMOKER renting room, 
beautiful setting Share kitchen and 
bath Furnished sining room. Must 
love music $600 ♦ month security 
and lease Nto pets 663-7805 7-5-4t 



PRINCETON APARTMBNTi Four 
rooms one bath, eatin kitchen stor- 
age, garage, heat and hot water 
included, air conditioning, second 
floor No smoking: no pels; suitable 
for one person only $1275/month 
plus utilities Available July 1st Call 
(609) 921-8844: ask (or Albert Toto 

DAVILA'S LANDSCAPINQ Qual 
ity lawn cutting, fertilizing, cleanups, 
mulching, tree trimming service and 
fence building References. Call for 
free estimate. (609)371-3492, or cell 
(609)977-7638. 6-28-41 

BIRDHOUSES: The hKist unusual 
birdhouses you have ever seen Tall. 
short, any color imaginable Can be 
custom designed Birds flock togeth- 
er! Birds of a Feather (609) 
683-5514. 



MOVING a REMOVAL: Princeton 
resident will do local moving Junk 
removal from roof to cellar Light con- 
struction debris. Shed and garage 
cleanout Prompt and reasonable 
Call 609-720-9016 5.24.10 1 

PMNCETON MUSIC CONNICTION 

Music for Weddings, Parties. Year 
2000 Special Events The best in lazz 
swing, rock bands Classical sok>isls 
and Princeton Intermezzo Trio and 
Quartet (609)936-9611 



p Prudential 

Pioneer Real Estate 




HOPEWELL BORO $24 M.oo 

3 BR, 1 .5 BA Colonial features many 
renovations including hardwood floors 
upstairs & down. Relax on the large 
wrap around porch this summer 




EAST WINDSOR $236,900 

Less than 3 Years Old! 3 BR, 2.5 BA 
w/cherry ElK. sumptuous Master Suite 
family room, fireplace, porch. 2-car ga- 
rage, tons of extras! 



New Listing 




Close to the Horse Park. 



Real Estate Broker.L l c ^^ 

Four Nas.sau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 
Web site at http://www.ntcallaway.com 



609-921-1050 SOTHEBYS 

Inlcmatioiul Realty 



Now centered in an oval of 
lawn surrounded by specimen 
trees and shrubs, this handsome 
light-filled New Jersey farm- 
house c 1 830 boasts a succes- 
sion of owners who have hon- 
ored its historic origins, 
allowing it lo nourish through 
caring stewardship. The formal 
entry opens to the spacious liv- 
ing room, with fireplace; once, 
two formal parlors, it is fully 
open to the fronl-to-back center 
hall, presently defined by clas- 
sic pillars, and has two doors 
opening to a side porch and 
hardwood fioors which con- 
tinue throughout the house. 
Steps lead down lo the dining 
room, with fireplace, dmir to a 
covered porch, and back stairs. 
The sunny back-to-front eat-in 
kitchen has a beamed ceiling. 
On the second fioor, the master 
bedroom, two adjoining bed- 
rooms and a sitting room/ 
bedroom and hall bath. On the 
third floor, a large bright fin- 
ished room, is an artist's studio 
On 2+ acres in Roosevelt, now 
a town on the National Register 
of Historic Places. $375,000 



Helping people find their homes, 
since 1965. 




PLAINSBORO $414,000 

4 BR, 2.5 BA Colonial located in the 
muchsoiqjMf^fter "Gentry" neighbor- 
hood. Professional landscaping and a 
large custo m deck readv to entertain 





WEST WINDSOR $879,000 

Ready for Summer! Impeccably main- 
tained 5 BR, 4.5 BA, custom home fea- 
turmg in-ground pool w/waterfall, full 
fin, bsmt. w/exercise room & sauna. 



MU-\ i v.UiVli-.K T I W i'. 5)388,000 
Spacious Colonial featuring 4 BR. 2.5 
BA, hardwood floors, brick fireplace. 
This stately home is set on a one acre 
lot. Please call for details. 




HOPEWELL TWP. $920 000 

A MUST SEE! A stately 4 BR, 3 full, 
2 half bath home on 2.70 private 
wooded acres. Large activities room 
could be 5th BR, Come See This One! 



138 Nassau Street, Princeton NJ 08542 

(609) 430-1288 



Visit us at: http://www.prudentialpioneer. 





OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, 1-4 PM 
HISTORIC ROCKY HILL 

Rocky Hill — A great buy lovely Colonial on 1 acre fenced 
yard. Hardwood floors, vinyl siding, hot tub, updated kitchen, 
shed and more! Directions: N. 206, R. 518, L. Merritt (sign) 
house on comer of Washington St. (518). Call the Princeton 
ofTice, 92 1-1900. 034-5958. $309,900 — $1,798 per month 




TALK ABOUT A MAKt-OVEK!!: 
Hopewell — New hardwood floors in kitchen, new appliances, 
bathrooms renovated. FR w/brick fireplace, screened porch, full 
basement. Beautiful yard with prof landscaping. Call the Princ- 
eton office, 921-1900. 034-005928. 

$334,000 — $1,961 per month 




OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, 1-4 PM 
LIVE IN PRINCETON! 

Princeton — Three story TH w/3 bedrooms, LR, DR. eat-in 
kitchen w/deck, 1 car garage plus family room, all for this low 
price. Directions: Route 206 to Cherry Valley to Griggs Dr. to 
William Livingston to #217. Call the Princeton office, 921- 
1 900. 034-5935. $229,000 — $1 ,328 per month 




CUSTOM BUILT DECK HOME 

Hopewell Township — Spectacular 2 year old custom built deck 
home on 3.5 acres. Elegant master and gourmet kitchen. Call the 
Princeton office, 921-1900. 034-5893. 

$669,000 — $3,927 per month 



GREAT LOCATION 

Princeton Junction — Three bedroom ranch convenient to rail- 
road, shopping, university & main roads. Large enclosed yard. 
Remodeled baths, WW schools. Call the Princeton office, 921- 
1 900. 034-5883. $274,900 — $1,595 per month 




OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, 1-4 PM 
WESTERN SECTION 

Princeton — Located on a quiet street, this bright, well kept 3 
bedroom home sits amid lush landscaping with a large fenced 
yard. Just a short walk to downtown! Directions: Rt. 206 to 
Mountain Ave., 1st right is Bayard to #224. Call the Princeton 
office, 92 1-1900. 034-005929. $433,000 — $2,542 per month 




PRINCETON OAKS 

West Windsor — This wonderful home offers bright, sunny 
rooms, a gourmet kitchen, first floor bedroom with full bath. 
The lovely family room opens to a gorgeous paver patio and 
beautiful yard. Call the Princeton office, 921-1900. 034- 
005908. $629,999 — $3,698 per month 



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PRINCETON JUNCTION 

Princeton Junction — Close to trains & schools is this 3 bed- 
room, 2 bath custom built Ranch with 2 car garage plus work 
shed. Call the Princeton office, 921-1900. 034-5918. 

$274,900 — $1,595 per month 



OPEN 7 DAYS • (609) 921-1900 • 350 NASSAU STREET, PRINCETON 




WEICHERT 

ONE STOP. 



For Mortgage info 
call1-800-829-CASH 

For Insurance info 
call 609-386-2884 



Monthly payments are for 30year conventional lued rate mortgages as detailed below 
Please ask about; Lower Oownpayments'Lower Monthly Pavments-Other Options 



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PRINCITON ArARTMENT rent- 
al: Spacious, charming, extra large 
living roonn. fireplace, hardwood 
floors. 1 bedroonri ♦ den/sunroom, w/ 
cathedral ceiling, lovely contempo- 
rary home, central a/c, private 
entrance, plenty of partung. patio, 
garden setting. NYC bus, convenient 
location, no pets, non-srTK)ker Avail- 
able September 1st $1570/rrK>nlh inci 
utilities Call (609)924-2345 7-5-2t 

LIVE MIDWAY •■TWUN Prince 
ton and fvlew York City in a two- 
bedroom townlx)use in Metuchen, 10 
blocks from railroad station. Hard- 
wood floors, tile bath, full basement, 
and private garden with deck and 
old-brick patio A steal at $124,900 
Call (732)549- 1465 7-5-2t 

BOAT, MOTOR, TfUILKR 14 

Lowe Vhull aluminum boat with 14 hp 
Johnson outboard, galvanized Haul- 
Rite trailer Anchors, rod holders, 
downrigger, etc. Great river, bay 
boati $1,800. Call (609)430-1644 

7-5-2t 



_ ALt KINDS OF FLOORS restored 
_ like new No-wax shine guaranteed 
» full yeari Wood floors? Restored with- 
O out sanding Satisfaction guaranteed 
*~ tor over a decade Free estimates 
Call (609) 924-1574 or visit 
www allstatecleaning com tf 

ST. JUDC'S NOVENA: lulay the 
Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, 
glorified, loved and preserved 
throughout the world now and forever 
Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us St 
Jude. worker of miracles, pray tor us 
St Jude, helper of the hopeless, pray 
for us Say this prayer nine times a 
day By the ninth day your prayer will 
t>e answered. It has never been 
krwwn to tail Publication must be 
promised Thank you St Jude EZ 



Why Is a futon from 

WHITE LOTUS 

Miporior to any othor 

mattrosoT 

handmade 

only layers of natural cotton 

no stiff or sagging steel 
no questionable chemicals 

soft, rryjlding, caressing 

-unlike tDenI metal- 
natural cotton breathes 
-cooler in summer- 
-watmer in winter- 
Nothing is more comfortable 
(Ntothing is better for your health 
Nothing is better for our earth. 

WhIU Lotus Futon 
202 Nassau Stroot 

(fi09) 497-1000 
MontoSat 10-5:30 

Thursday ftll 6 

Crib to King size 
Custom work welcome 



tf-alt 



BEAUTIFUL. CUSTOM-MADE 

draperies, period window treatments 
of all types Slipcovers and fine re- 
upholslery Shades and blinds Fabric 
and wallcovering at discount. Serving 
all your interior design needs with in- 
fxxne or office consultation Estimates 
cheerfully given Call Sherry The Cre- 
ative Heart (609) 397-2 1 20, tfc 



SHADES: Lamp rrKXjnting 
and lamp repairs, Nassau Interiors, 
162 Nassau Street tfc 



CLASSIFIED 
AD RATES 

$6.50 for 30. words, per 
insertion, plus 10 cents for 
each additional word Box 
number ads are $1.00 
extra. 

Payment of ad within six 
days after publication 
saves 50 cents billing 
charge. For certain ads, 
payment in advance is 
required. 

Cancellations must be 
made by 5 p.m. Monday; 
reorders by 4 p.m. Tues- 
day, the week of 
publication. 

Ads may be called in, 924- 
2200, mailed to PO Box 
664, Princeton 08542, or 
brought to the Town Topics 
office at 4 Mercer Street. 



I »• I " I " • •• • '* I "■ 



Martin Blackman 

LANDSCAPING 



Princeton, NJ 



609-683-4013 



25 years of thoughtful, knowledgeable 
landscape design executed with care 
Best-quality, low-maintenance plantings 
Terraces and walks 

FREE CONSULTATION 



9 



VINTAGE STYLE interior design 
— colorful collage furniture, vintage 
fabrics, and collectibles to create a 
warm, inviting look We'll come to 
your home and find new ways to use 
your own furniture with a touch of our 
magic Birds of a Feather (609) 
683-5514. 

EXPERT LANDSCAPE DBSION 
COMMERCIAL « RESIDENTIAL 

Lawn & gardening service pruning & 

tree removal, patios & walkways 

Snow removal 

Experienced in all phases 

Lafry O. ScaiMialla 924-2668 

tfc 



FREE APPRAISAL DAY on 

antiques brought to the shop on 
Wednesday Cash paid for antiques 
and collectibles Appraisals and esti- 
mates for house contents Actively 
buying antique and custom furniture 
Buying oil paintings, rugs, silver, 
clocks, porcelains and glassware 
Toys, doorstops, quilts, lamps, steins, 
orientilia, Floseville and other art pot- 
tery If you're rrxjving, downsizing, or 
have questions, call Gerald Joseph 
Sr at Post Office Antiques, Kingston, 
NJ, (609) 279-9477 or (609) 252- 
0147 All inquiries are confidential, tf 



The Final Three... 

Custom Built Homes From $1,500,000 



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32 CHAMBERS STREET * PRINCETON, NJ ^ 



800-763-1416 * 609-924-1416 



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Princeton Township — Nestled among tall trees, on V* of an acre, 
this five bedroom, IVi bath Colonial/Split Level Home is a gem. Entry 
foyer with Pergo floors leads you to the lovely living room with 
picture window and hardwood floors. Kitchen overlooks private back- 
yard with rose garden. French dcxirs in the dining room open to the 
enclosed back porch. Lower level 20x13 family room. Wonderful 
location! Walk to school! MLS #1 108363 $598,000 






I " 



Visit our very informative web site at www.slockton-realtor.com to view ANY listing in 
the Multiple Listing Service (MLS). Click on the Listings and Phoio icon at the Mloni of 
ttie menu on the left, enter the MLS # and hit GO! Any Realtor in our otTice may provide 
you a list of MLS #"s in your price range Please don't hesitate to call us 






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wwM'.stockton-realtor.com 




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POND VIEW 

Princeton's Premier Residential Community 
333 Pretty Brook Rood, Princeton 
609 924,0333 or www pondviewnjcom 

Amy Rutkowski, Listing Agent 

Gloria Nilson Reoltors • 33 Witherspoon St, 



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oldwell 




anker 



We know Princeton. 
The world knows us. 

COACH LANE, HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP 
OPEN HOUSE SAT. & SUN. 12-4 













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Five limited edition custom manor homes to be built on private homesites from three to sixteen acres. An 
outstanding collection of dramatic home designs featuring stunning courtyard entries, magnificent grand 
foyers, sumptuous gourmet kitchens, handsome detailed libraries and exquisite master bedroom suites. 
From 4,200 sq. ft. of quality craftsmanship and superb finishing. Complete customization available for 
the discerning buyer who expects the best. Priced from $769,000 with many upgrades and extras includ- 
ed. Directions: Rt. 5 1 8 W. to 579, .8 miles to Coach. 





Magnificent property. Circa 1785 farm house on 
26 acres of beautiful countryside on Sourland 
Mountains in Hillsborough. PRT3463. $795,000 



Set on 10 acres, this 12,000 sq. ft. brick 
Colonial boasts scenic views from its 14 rooms. 
Heated marble floors, 4 fireplaces. Hopewell. 
PRT3496. $2,490,000 




REALTOR 



Visit our national web site at http://www.coldwellbanker.com 

10 Nassau Street, Princeton • 609-921-1411 



coLouieu. 

BANKCR □ 



Rnldentlal Brokcrag* 



f OIML HOU9MQ 
Or^OHTUNITV 

©1997Coldwel! Banker Residential BroJorage Corporation. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. All Offices are Independently Owned and Operated 



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ENTRY LEVEL 

United Laboratories, a 36 
year old employee owned 
mfr. and a leader in the 
Chemical Specialty field, 
has an opportunity for the 
right individual to sell our 
chemical specialty items 
to end users. Quality 
products, expanding mar- 
kets and employee own- 
ership makes UNITED an 
attractive place to work. 

If you possess the follow- 
ing traits: 



• You're a SELF STARTER 

• You have the ability to 
GRASP THINGS QUICKLY 

• You have Prior direct sales 
^ exp (we will train the right 
P person) 

• A COMMITMENT TO 
REACH YOUR GOALS 

• YOU WANT TO GET 
THINGS DONE NOW AND 
HAVE FUN DOING IT! 

This position offers; 

• A 26 week, 2-phase 
training program that pays 
a SALARY IN THE FIRST 
PHASE of training, a CAR 
ALLOWANCE OF $433 
PER MONTH. BONUS, + 
VERY HIGH UNLIMITED 
COMM's in the 2nd phase 

• Employee status in OUR 
company that offers you a 
full benefit package includ- 
ing Health, Dental. Life. 
401 K + STOCK OWNER- 
SHIP 

• A LOCAL TERRITORY in 
Princeton that will possess 
REPEAT SALES & 
ACCOUNT PROTECTION 

• MANAGEMENT OPPOR- 
TUNITIES 

• Incentives that include trips, 
$$$. and the ability to grow 
your career in a direction 
that YOU control. 

For immediate 
consideration 

CALL 

CRAIG BRINEY 

Northeast Zone Mgr. 

Monday 

800 826 5406 

Listen for tone 

and enter 04 

UNITED LABS (EOE) 
www.beearthsmart.com 

•••••••••••• 



Employment Opportunities 
in tlie Princeton Area 



HALF-TIME BABYSITTBR PART-TIMI AMISTANT tor execu 
wanted to care for sweet 1-year-old live recruiter Home office located in 
boy in Princeton Must have excellent Princeton Need to be organized, with 
references, own transportation polite telephone skills 10-20 hours per 
430-1582 6-14-2t week Call Jane at (609)252-0100. 

PNOTO STUDIO LGOKINO foraPRINCBTON CHARTER 

recepiionist 30-40 houts/week Flexi SCHOOL is still accepting applica- 
ble Candidate should have excellent lions from dynamic, experienced part- 
phone manner, customer service linr»e and full-time teachers with strong 
experience, mulli-tasking skills, and academic backgrounds for the 2000- 
PC knowledge Interest in photogra- 2001 school year in the following 
phy a plus but not necessary Start areas: first grade, English, mathemat- 
mid-July Fax resume (609) ics, science, history. French. Spanish. 
924-9357 6-28-31 physical education, art and music 

PCS will offer grades 1-8 for the 2000- 
2001 academic year This public 
scriool. opened in 1997, has high 
academic standards, enrolls a diverse 
population, and enjoys strong com- 
munity support Please send a letter 
of interest and resume to: Princeton 
Charter School. 575 Ewing St . Prince- 
ton. NJ 08540 EOE 



NECO HQNEYT CAREER CNANOET 

Dissatisfied with your present earn- 
ings'' We will train you to become a 
successful real estate agent Call Pat 
921-1411. (t 



HELP WANTED: Female/Male, 
mowing lawns. 3 days/week $180- 
$225/week V*/ill consider high school 
students Must know visual difference 
between grass, flowers, trees and 
shrubs Please call (609) 921-8440 or 
(732)297-2911. 6-28-a 

COMPUTER PROORAMMINO 

teacher for Princeton independent 
school Pascal. Visual Basic. C-f+. E- 
mail resume to 
LKIDDERttHunK12.NJ. US. 7-5-2t 

PART TIME PET SITTER: 

Princeton Mercer County area Work 
with animals. Independent, flexible 
schedule, great pay (732) 
424-2292 6-28-8t 



COMPUTER TEACHER warned 
Help ifiacn f^om lo learn skills Judy, 
(609)520-0720 

HOUSEKEEPINQ 10-15 hours per 
week (fiexitjie nours possible), to assist 
in mainienmg friendly, adull household 
General household lasks, cleaning, laun- 
dry, sewing, miscellaneous Also need- 
ed yard work/gardening 
(732)297-1254 

DELIVERY PERSON NEEDED for 

catering Knowledge of Princeton 
area and good driving record neces- 
sary Full Iime/pan time, weekends 
available. Call Stacie Somlak 
921-2777 6-28-?t 

MATH TEACHER WANTED fulor 

students in various math skills Judy 
(609)520-0720 7-5-21 



Lester & Robert Slatoff 

AUCTIONEERS 

ANTIQUE DEALERS - APPRAISERS 

Furniture, China, Glass, Household, Silver & Jewelry 

Trenton, NJ 
609-393-4848 21 5-736-8989 



PART TIME ELEMENTARY basic 

skills teacher with Special Ed expeii- 
ence welcome 924-8126. 

PART TIME HELP WANTED 

Days, evenings, or weekends avail- 
able. Anitas Hallnnark Card Shiop. 
1225 Slate Road (next to Grand 
Union ) Call (609)924-6991 

AFTER SCHOOL CHILD CARE 

Seeking warm, energetic, reliable per- 
son with own car to care for engaging 
4-year-'old twin girls Begin Sept 
Three or four weekdays per week 
from 3:15 pm . approximately 10-12 
hours per week Excellent references 
required: 497-7302 6-28-4t 




27 Witherspoon Street • Princeton 
609-924-3076 • Monday-Saturday 8-6:30 



R*al EsUt* Sal** 
L*olUng lor a N*w C«r**rT 

Our sales team in Princeton is looking 
for 2 dynamic professionals to |Oin our 
team. With 85 years of experience 
and state of the art training we offer 
you high earnings with great flexibili- 
ty. Find out about how our interna- 
tional rekx:ation connections and net- 
work with New York's most prestigious 
Real Estate firms can propel your 
career. f^e-Licensing classes avail- 
able days, evenings and Saturdays 
Be licensed in three weeks. Call Jerry 
Lancaster (609) 921-2700 

W*i«l*l RMiHor* 

Ptlno#voii 



The Adlerman Agency 

Realtors and Insurers 
For All Area Listings 

337 Applegarth Road, Cranbury. NJ 08512 
(609) 655-7788 



COMMERCIAL BUILDING 
RENTAL 

PRINCETON BOROUGH — 1st floor 
in center of Borough V/2 blocks from 
main University gates. Approximately 
2,361 sq. ft. @ $26.00 sq. ft. + utilities. 



HIGHWAY COMMERCIAL ZONE - 

Princeton address (Montgomery Twp.). 
Small 3 bedroom ranch on property. Call 
for details. $250,000 



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32 CHAMBERS STREET * PRINCETON, NJ 
800-763-1416 * 609-924-1416 







Bonnie 
Gray-Rankin 

Home 

Mortgage 

Consultaant 



UH I Si HOME 
r\U(.() VIORTG.^GE 



600 Alexander Road 
Princeton NJ 08540 
609 895 1839 Home Office 
609-24.V04i7Fa» 
609-888 7079 Pager 

609-243-000 1 «t 1 9 Office 
tnnnaranlungrayOmoflgage owictargo com 







■ AL BSTAT 

Sales and Rentals 



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HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP 



Deborah Leamann 



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email: debleaint®aol com • www deborahleamar^ninterlor.com 
250 SOUTH MAIN STREET ' * 

PENNINGTON, NJ 
609.737.3330 



I »• 
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"Marlboro on the Meadow" - Five bedroom, 3'/: bath Colonial on over 3 
acre& in Hopewell Township. New Construction. Aiming for September 
Occupancy. Top-of-the-line materials with time to choose upgrades Call our 
ofTice for details. MLS#1 103437. $651,000 

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Joan Eisenberg 

is pleased to announce 
her new affiliation with 

KDyMlSC P R 1 N^ETO N 

Princeton Forrestal Village 

1 12 Village Blvd. • P.O. Box 430 

Plainsboro, NJ 08536 

Bus: (609) 951-8600 
Eves: (609) 275 1615 
, Toll Free: I 877 JOAN- IN j 
e-mail: jeremax@aol.com 

Same Great Professional 
Service From NXs #1 
Remax Agent in 1999! 



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"Gladstone of the Woods" - Four/five bedroom. 3'/: bath Colonial on 3% 
acres m Hopewell Township. New Construction. Hoping for September 
occupancy. Buyer has time to choose cabinets, colors, flooring & lights Call 
our office for details. MLS#1 103440. ^ $639,000 



I •• 



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We invite you to visit our website at the address below, to view any Properties in the Multiole 
Listing System Open our website, click on the Listings and Photo icon enter the MLS 
number and hit OO' It is that simple lo view any property in the MLS, Call us for MLS #'s 
in your price range. 



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N-tCallaw^, 

Real Estate Broker.L.L.c. s^ 



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Four Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08542 (609) 921-1050 



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Princeton - Renovations refreshed the basics and created a glowing up-to-date 
ambiance for this Dutch Colonial. Lustrous new hardwood floors. Side porch, 
screened porch, all-white kitchen opens to deck, beautiful garden views. 4 comer 
bedrooms, Vh baths. $474,950 




Hopewell Township - On a 2+ acre lot near Pennington, the superb floor plan of 
this handsome Contemporary is designed for easy family living, gracious enter- 
taining. 4 bedrooms, 4 baths. Broad deck, pool with spa and waterfall. 

New Price $665,000 




Lawrence Township - This attractive one-level Contemporary, transformed by 
renovations and additions, offers a flexible floor plan. Skylit gallery leads to 
bedroom wing. Guest wing offers sitting room and kitchen. Secluded patios, 3+ 
acres, Princeton address. $575,000 




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Princeton - High on the Princeton ridge in a sun-dappled glen, this Georgian 
style house offers light-filled elegance. Marble, and wood floors of richly hued 
maple, diagonal bleached oak accent spacious rooms. Living room opens to music 
conservatory. Pool. 




Harbourton - Meticulous planning brought this classic Colonial home and a 
landscape of spectacular pastoral views into balanced perfection. Elegant interior 
finishes - walnut floors, fireplaces with marble surrounds. Elegant landscaping, 
with pool and pool house. 




Princeton - This elegant brick in-town house, in the prestigious Western section, 
offers gracious rooms with elegant details - lofty ceilings, deep rich crown 
moldings, and chair-rails. Handsomely renovated. Stunning gourmet kitchen with 
breakfast area. 



Visit Our Web Site: www.ntcallaway.com 



Judith McCaughan 
Willa Stackpole 
Linda Hoff 
Shirley Kinsley 
Mary Grasso 
Barbara Blackwell 
Touran Batmanglidj 
Olive Westervelt 
Anne Williams 



Candice Walsh 
Norman Callaway, Jr. 
Florence Dawes 
Colleen Hall 
Mary Ann Schierholt 
Cheryl Goldman 
Ralph Runyon 
Marilyn Durkee 
Patricia Cahill 



Maura Mills 
Marcia Casey 
Diane Kilpatrick 
Gary Kilpatrick 
Christopher Tivenan 
Ann Galbraith 
Elizabeth Brian 
Valerie Young 
Robin Tervooren 
Judith Matthies 



NORMAN "PETE" CALLAWAY, 
BROKER 

Gail Eldridge, Exec. Asst. 
Pamela Parsons, Mktg. Dir. 
Nell Duncan, Advertising 
Christine McGann, Asst. 



CALLAWAY COMMERCIAL 
Tim Norris 

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 
Dianne Bleacher 
Karen Urisko 
Stanford Spencer 
CALLAWAY MANAGEMENT 
Jerome A. Wig, RPA 



Exr/wifKe Affiliate of 

SOT H EBYS 

International Realty 



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Grey Stone Manor 



A 10,000 square foot Belgian Stone Estate on two acres just minutes away from the center of Prince- 
ton. This fifteen room house has absolutely outstanding craftsmanship, vaulted foyer surrounded by a 
flow of spacious rooms with large Pella windows. Enjoy an inviting family room with a wall of sliding 
doors that opens to a stone patio with a new hot tub overlooking the tennis court and a view of the 
magnificent landscaping. A tru.e gem of a kitchen with Corian countertops, top-of-the-line cabinetry and 

I 

appliances. The back staircase conveniently leads to an au-pair suite. A four-car garage, three fireplaces, 
sprinkler system, 10-zone central air system, 2 laundry rooms, your own tennis court, indoor handball/ 
basketball half court, newly renovated recreation room with bar and exercise room and a new wine cellar 
are certainly more than pluses. You have found your new home in Lawrence Township with a Princeton 
address. $1,795,000 

Marketed by Marianne Greer 



Gloria Nilson 




Realtors 



MEMBER 



"Any size house & garden under the sun" 

33 Wither spoon Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08542 • 609-921-2600 

\e1 http://www.glorianilson.com yl. 

wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm^^'ii'i^mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmrm 




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